Reminiscing about Summer: Panaka/Paanagam, a recipe

Autumn in Adelaide

Autumn has come and nearly gone. A wonderful time of year here, yet this year I spent a good month of it in glorious London Springtime. (Thank you Volcano for the additional 11 days!).

I always find it quite eerie to travel when it is Spring in my destination, and everything is renewing and bursting into being and into flower, only to return home to Autumn and everything closing down, drooping, dropping and preparing for a sleepy winter. It does take some adjustment.

Spring in London

So to celebrate the onset of Summer in London and before I leap into a plethora of posts on cold weather soups, here is a lovely Summer Drink of Indian origin. Panaka is an Indian Limeaide, sweet, tangy and very refreshing. Enjoy! (Or save the recipe for your next summer day.)

By the way, the source of this recipe is a set of wonderful publications on Hindu Festivals, rites and food that has been put together by the Kauai Aadheenam for Western media and anyone who is interested. Panaka is associated with Rama Navami, the birthday of Rama. You can download the sheet for Rama Navami (including the Panaka recipe) and also see the other festival publications here.

It is also possible to use this as Neividyam for Thaipusam.

Indian Limeade

Panaka, sweet Indian Limeaide

Source : inspired by Rama Navami
Cuisine: Indian
Prep time: 5 mins
Cooking time: 0 mins
Serves: 4 – 6 people, depending how you use it

ingredients
0.25 cup jaggery or brown sugar
4 cups water
juice of 1 medium sized lime
1.5 tspn grated fresh ginger
1 tspn ghee (use at room temp, or melt before using)
pinch cardamom powder

method
Mix all ingredients and serve cold. I recommend making a double batch.

The Drinks Series

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About Ganga108

Heat in the Kitchen, Cooking with Spirit. Temple junkie, temple builder, temple cleaner. Lover of life, people, cultures, travel. Champion of growth, change and awareness. Taker of photos. Passionate about family. Happy.
This entry was posted in 01 Mid Summer, Hindu, Indian, Lemons, Teas, Drinks and other liquids, VEGETARIAN and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

43 Responses to Reminiscing about Summer: Panaka/Paanagam, a recipe

  1. ilva says:

    I can understand your feelings about speedy moving back and forth between seasons, just to travel by air plane in the same hemisphere, within Europe, makes me feel as if my soul is left behind and need to catch up! And this will be a perfect drink for us when the sun decides to conquer the ever present rain here!

  2. Maninas says:

    I really like this drink, and your photos. Welcome back! Hug

  3. Pingback: Recipe Maker » Blog Archive » Reminiscing about Summer: Panaka, a recipe « A Life (Time) of Cooking

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  5. Apu says:

    Yumm! I adore citrus drinks!!

  6. maryestcourt says:

    Lovely photos. The drink sounds cool!!Will file it away for summer. About 9C in Hobart today but a lovely blue sky and sunshine. Just back from my yoga class & going to make a chocolate cake now.

  7. aqua says:

    I love that last picture. Simply awesome!

  8. chaitra says:

    Lovely blog with beautifully presented recipes…..
    Panaka sounds refreshing n worth trying.
    Do drop in sometime

  9. Aparna says:

    This is one of absolute favourites, though we make ours a bit different. Your picture makes it even more delicious. :)
    No lime juice in ours, and twe make this on the last (10th day) of Navrathri celebrations.

  10. London Eng says:

    Awesome Blog! Keep it up!

  11. M. Case says:

    This is one of our favourites.

  12. Mentioned you Broad Beans Mash recipe on ‘Serge the Concierge’ today.

    Here’s the link
    http://www.sergetheconcierge.com/2010/05/broad-beans-got-soul-and-are-in-season-spring-is-fava-time.html

    Serge

  13. Bordeaux says:

    I like the sound of this. And something tells me a hint or more of gin in there might be fun too.

  14. Divya Vikram says:

    Very pretty fotos and the panakam looks like a perfect refreshing cooler :)

  15. looks refreshing. great drink.

  16. eleni says:

    The ingredients surely… scream for a second batch!!

  17. Sounds yummy, though I have to admit that the idea of putting ghee in lemonade sounds very weird. It kind of makes sense, considering that fat does enhance flavours in food, but it still feels a bit weird.

  18. posoft says:

    HI,
    I really like that picture. Rama Navami is one of my favorite festivals and I really like your drink (sweet Indian Limeaide).
    Thanks

  19. Lynn says:

    What a lovely looking drink – and ooh, I think I’ve got all the ingredients. Yippee.

  20. Reno Guy says:

    Yumm! I adore citrus drinks!!

  21. s says:

    lovely pics..and the drink..boy it looks soooooo good!
    http://forkbootsandapalette.wordpress.com

  22. Beautiful photos! And this cool drink looks awsome…I love the ingredients, so I will have to make it this summer!
    Ronelle

  23. kristin says:

    so good! i made it without ghee (vegan) and agave instead of sugar. also, i put a hunk of ginger in the garlic press and squeezed to get all the ginger-juices into it. it really enhanced the flavor.

  24. Rashmi says:

    Panaka looks really refreshing.
    We call this drink:pannah.
    My mom’s version has a pinch of roasted cumin powder instead of ghee and cardamom.
    Thanks for sharing

  25. Vancouver says:

    I like the sound of this. And something tells me a hint or more of gin in there might be fun too.

  26. Mexico says:

    What a lovely looking drink – and ooh, I think I’ve got all the ingredients. Yippee.

  27. What a great recipe and a very nice blog.

  28. Gorgeous space you have here! Glad to have found you.

  29. Mmm this looks devine! What a great way to welcome spring down under, will def be sipping on this as soon as the sun warms up our little part of the world!

    Keep em’ coming, I’d like to see more spring recipe ideas for eating outside!

  30. Now you have me reminiscing about Summer…

  31. Monica says:

    Your limeaide sounds wonderful but your photo of the trees is absolutely superb! I’m a sucker for evergreen. =)

  32. Soma says:

    Coming from Sonia’s twitter update. bookmarked from summer. I have never used gur to make shikhanji, or ghee, or cardamom. If the drink is served chilled, will the ghee solidify and surface on the top?

  33. mike says:

    wonderful article.
    indian art

  34. I’ve never heard of Panaka, but this looks just divine! Am bookmarking it for warm weather.

  35. this is a very cherished drink in our home and it was indeed the first drink i blogged – very delicious glass of Panakkam – The ghee is a new addition – will remember to try that next time – Spring is here full burst as well and beautiful colors surround – cheers, Priya

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