On Life, and a wonderful recipe for Drumstick Kadhi

Winter-1

Some years ago I was sitting with some business colleagues, sharing and supporting each other in our individual challenges. One person asked, what is your goal, what do you want, what is your vision?

As we went around the table, people shared their dreams – a certain number of clients, a level of income, growing the business in a new area, closing off unprofitable ares, the need to overcome arguments with business partners.

My response was, I know that whatever comes for me is right for me. I want more than anything to be able to cope with it, and to handle it well, whether it is success or failure, problems or enablers.

Well!

I was castigated for not having goals. I was accused of being “too Hindu” (!!??). It hurt most that that comment came from my dearest friend in the group. I was told that I would not get anywhere without goals. I felt belittled, cast out and rejected by this group of people that I had trusted deeply.

I do have things that I want. I want my business to be successful. My family to be happy. Those around me to feel loved. I want to ease the pain of anyone around me for just a moment, to remind them of their strength, courage and possibilities.

My life journey is clear. I know the endpoint. But I do not want the road from here to there to be smooth all of the time. I want to be tested. I want to fail and do better next time. I want an open heart and love for all. I want to give acceptance. And all of the faffing around the edges, all the cooking and photography, all the work and its stresses, the intellectual thinking and analysis, the number of facebook likes, twitter followers, flickr visits, new dishwashers, music collections, all the worry over such trivial things, that is all it is, just trivial. My life is a journey to realise and manifest this, to focus on the right things, to let go of resistance, judgement, frustration. To shine just a little in someone’s darkness. To lean on my own spine and not depend on others for what is rightly my responsibility. To melt into the unknown.

And what I know, so deeply, is there is no good or bad, no permanence, no worldy success, achievement or failure. What can feel good might be bad, what feels like a tragedy might be for the best.

Pema Chodran says “Life is like that. We don’t know anything. We call something bad; we call it good. But really, we just don’t know.”

All I want is to melt into the not knowing.

I am so grateful to my friends for letting me have it so strongly on that day years ago. It helped me to clarify what my life is about. Love you all.

Winter-2

Drumsticks

I have a dear friend, a doctor, gardener, father, teacher, and much much more. Recently he gave me some drumsticks for his garden. His wife and he had picked 12 dozen or more of them! I have read a lot about drumsticks but never seen them, and they are very rare in Australia. I was delighted to get them. I decided to make Enjoy Indian Food’s Drumstick Kadhi. Make sure that you check out her recipe.

Yoghurt

Kadhi is a slow cooked yogurt or buttermilk dish, thickened with besan (chana daal flour, chickpea flour) which is later tempered with spices. In Indian recipes the terms “curd”, “buttermilk” and “yoghurt” are used almost interchangeably.  You can use buttermilk especially if you are after that little sour tang that buttermilk provides. If you are using yoghurt, look for unsweetened natural yoghurt, eg Greek Yoghurt or yoghurt from your Indian grocery. We think of curd as being something a little different to yoghurt, but in Indian recipes, yoghurt can generally be substituted for curd. If it appears that the recipe requires a thicker yoghurt than you can find, just hang the yoghurt for a while, allowing the moisture to drip out.

Important Posts

Drumstick Kadhi or Shevgyachya Shengachi Kadhi

Source: Enjoy Indian Food’s Drumstick Kadhi.
Cuisine: Indian
Prep time: 10 mins
Cooking time: 20 mins
Serves: 3 – 4 people, depending how you use it

ingredients
1 cup yoghurt
2 cups water
2 Tblspns besan
salt to taste
0.5 tspn sugar (use white if you can, to maintain the beautiful colour of the dish)
1 – 2 drumsticks cut into 10cm/4″ pieces

Tempering
1 tbsp ghee
0.5 tsp mustard seeds
0.5  tsp cumin seeds
0.5 tsp asafoetida
0.5 tsp turmeric powder
large pinch of fenugreek seeds
1 sprig curry leaves
2 green chilies, slit
2 tsp ginger, grated

Drumstick Kadhi

method
Head over to Enjoy Indian Food’s Drumstick Kadhi to see the method. I love this dish a lot, it is a keeper.

Drumstick Kadhi

Enjoy!

Namaskaram.

What has been happening in The Kitchen lately?

See a round up in June Activity, some great pics.

From the Yoghurt Series

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About Ganga108

Heat in the Kitchen, Cooking with Spirit. Temple junkie, temple builder, temple cleaner. Lover of life, people, cultures, travel. Champion of growth, change and awareness. Taker of photos. Passionate about family. Happy.
This entry was posted in 06 Early Winter, Dairy, Drumsticks, Indian, Tofu, Yoghurt and Paneer, VEGETARIAN and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to On Life, and a wonderful recipe for Drumstick Kadhi

  1. Pingback: June’13 Activity in The Kitchen – Quinces, Cumquats, BBQs, Drumsticks | Heat in the Kitchen

  2. Ganga, thanks for those thoughts. I woke up this morning worried about something very trivial. I
    read this post and it relaxed me.
    I would have never thought drumsticks could have gone into a kadhi. We get frozen drumsticks here in the US and that is all I use. The fresh ones are dry by the time they reach super markets . The best are the fresh ones grown by friends who live in FL and they bring or send with someone who are visiting from there.

  3. Have you noticed a difference between using green chilies and jalapeños?

  4. Pingback: August 3rd 2013. On Indian Curd, Yoghurt and Buttermilk. Demystifying these Indian ingredients – very different to what you might be used to | Heat in the Kitchen

  5. Pingback: Seasonal Cooking for December – Early WINTER – Northern Hemisphere. | A Life (Time) of Cooking

  6. Pingback: Richard’s Aloo Mattar Sukhe (Potato and Pea Dry Curry). From The Archives. April, 2001. | Heat in The Kitchen

  7. Pingback: Salty, Garlicky Labneh/ Thick Thick Yoghurt | A Life (Time) of Cooking

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