Caramelised, Marinated King Oyster Mushrooms | With an Asian Twist

A wonderfully surprising dish.

Sauteed King Oyster Mushrooms with an Asian Twist | A Life (Time) of Cooking | Vegetarian

How do you use King Oyster Mushrooms? Slice these giant beauties and marinate them before cooking  in a heavenly caramelisation of the marinade.

You might also like to try Pasta with Porcinin Mushroom Sauce, or Vic’s Mushrooms. All our mushroom recipes are here and here, and our Salads here and here. Be inspired by our Summer dishes here and here.

The stems look amazing place on a plate on their own.

I have had a dish similar to this in Thailand, where the mushrooms are served on blocks of the softest tofu you can ever imagine. It was gorgeous.

Sauteed King Oyster Mushrooms with an Asian Twist | A Life (Time) of Cooking | Vegetarian

Caramelised, Marinated King Oyster Mushrooms with an Asian Twist

Source : Inspired by kblog
Cuisine: Asian
Prep time:10 mins plus marinating time
Cooking time: 10 mins
Serves: 4 – 6 serves, depending on how you use it

ingredients
6 – 8 king oyster mushrooms, sliced into half inch slices. Use the caps as well.
2 – 3 Tblspn or less of oil – use safflower or peanut if  you have it.
4 – 6 Tblspn tamari, shoyu, liquid aminos or other soy sauce (not too heavy)
1 Tblspn brown rice vinegar
1 Tblspn mirin
1/2 Tblspn Chinese Sesame Oil
sliced green onions (aka spring onions in Australia) – I use the green tops of a bunch of spring onions, but any part can be used
1 sliced chilli, or to taste (it does take up the chilli flavour, so don’t overdo it unless you like it hot)
pinch white pepper (black pepper does not complement Asian flavours, but white pepper does)

method
Marinate the sliced mushrooms in the tamari, brown rice vinegar, mirin, sesame oil, green onions and chilli for at least 30 minutes, carefully stirring several times to ensure they are coated with the marinade.

Sauteed King Oyster Mushrooms with an Asian Twist | A Life (Time) of Cooking | Vegetarian

You can leave them in the marinade for much longer if that suits. The mushrooms absorb the flavours of the marinade.

When you are ready to cook the mushrooms, heat a pan and lightly oil it. A good quality non stick pan is also very good here.

When the pan and the oil is hot, place the mushrooms into the pan, piece by piece. They will sizzle. Note that this is not a saute or stir fry — the pieces will be cooked on both sides by turning them over.

Cook for about a minute without moving them. You can dust lightly with white pepper while they cook.

Flip the mushrooms – I find using tongs to turn them is the easiest way. Reduce the heat a little.

Now add the remaining marinade to the mushrooms, and continue to baste them with the marinade until the mushrooms are cooked. The basting keeps the mushrooms moist while it allows them to caramelise with the liquid.

Finally turn the mushrooms over again, turn off the heat and allow them to sit for a minute or two in the pan.

Serve hot with a cool, crisp salad.

Sauteed King Oyster Mushrooms with an Asian Twist | A Life (Time) of Cooking | Vegetarian

 

 

Author: Ganga108

Heat in the Kitchen, Cooking with Spirit. Temple junkie, temple builder, temple cleaner. Lover of life, people, cultures, travel. Champion of growth, change and awareness. Taker of photos. Passionate about family. Happy.

10 thoughts on “Caramelised, Marinated King Oyster Mushrooms | With an Asian Twist”

  1. I just made this tonight! My cooking skills are generally pretty bad, but this recipe wasn’t so hard. The mushrooms are sooooo big, but they’re called “king” oyster mushrooms for a reason. So I cut up six of them, but cooked them in three separate batches. I was very close to adding extra sauce to the marinade and I’m glad I didn’t. At first, the marinade doesn’t seem to be enough, but if you let the mushrooms sit out long enough, they will release some of the marinade that they absorbed initially along with some moisture. Right before cooking, pour this leftover amount in a small bowl to be used for the basting during cooking. The author is wise to suggest adding the pieces one at a time; I added them all at once and it caused a little bit of oil splatter. Speaking of oil, I experimented use two tablespoons of oil for the first batch and three for the second batch. I would recommend using just two tablespoons, but it does create more smoke. Finally, I used the Chinese versions of the ingredients, but I think it turned out the same.

    Anyway, excellent recipe and I’d like to see if I can cook other things, particularly other types of mushrooms, in this style.

    Liked by 1 person

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