Black Onions – Onions Slow Roasted

Black onions sound intriguing, don’t they? Well they are. Onions, sauteed then cooked with vinegar and sugar until brown and crispy in a low oven. Sweet with a touch of sour and deep oniony flavours, they are the perfect topping for soups, salads and dals. They go well in sandwiches, rolls and wraps. Mix with chopped herbs and top rice with them. Mix into pasta dishes. Use them for lunches, snacks and dinner dishes.

The black onions keep well so they can be made and will last a week in the fridge. They are not burnt but rather are deeply caramelised.

Similar recipes include Lentils and Pasta with Caramelised Onions, Broad Bean Dip with Roasted Onions, and Urad Dal with Onions Four Ways.

Browse all of our Onion recipes or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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A Collection of 30 Soups for Late Autumn | Seasonal Cooking

Sometimes late Autumn can bring sunny days and warm weather still, and secretly we hope for it. But the farmers pray for rain, and most years it comes. Cold weather comes too. We settle in for 4 – 5 months of cold weather before the sunshine emerges again with its warmth and new life.

By now we have stocked up on the lentils and beans for winter. There is citrus fruit and root vegetables. The oven provides warmth in the kitchen. Soups, soups and soups are made – they become a daily ritual.

Similar posts include What to Do with Daikon Radish.

Enjoy our 30 Soup Suggestions for the month that heralds the colder weather to come.

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A Collection of 30 Salads for Late Autumn

By Late Autumn we have finally accepted that Summer has passed. Days and nights are cooler and mornings cold. The heater comes on. Rains are also expected. Farmers turn hopeful eyes skyward, keen to ensure farming efforts won’t go to waste and it won’t be another year of drought.

Salads are heavier, often featuring grains, lentils, pasta and even bread. French style, Italian style, Greek style, Persian style, we don’t really mind, as long as the salads are simple and delicious. Winter veggies and fruit are appearing in the shops.

Here are 30 of our best salads for Late Autumn.

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LATE AUTUMN – Delicious Dishes for Autumn Living | Seasonal Cooking

Enjoy these highlights from our Late Autumn classic recipes.

Celebrating Autumn

You can also browse other Late Autumn recipes:

If you have difficulty with any links, please let us know. We would love to fix them for you.

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Simmered Daikon Radish with Miso and Sesame Sauce

Daikon is popular in Japan and Korea (and each have a slightly different type of daikon), so flavours from these countries pair well with this long white radish. It is also used quite commonly in India, BTW, but here we are focusing in on some Japanese flavours.

The daikon is simmered with kombu, my favourite seaweed, and then served with a tahini-miso sauce. It is so delightful, and I serve it as a small starter. If I am eating alone, I dip the slices into the sauce, but for company, it is easier to place a spoonful of the sauce on top of each slice.

Sometimes I sprinkle some Korean chilli flakes or Japanese Shichimi Togarashi, (seven spice pepper) over the slices of daikon, and love the slight spice hit they give.

You might like to read What to Do with Daikon Radish.

Similar recipes include Mustard Greens with DaikonDaikon Salad with Coconut, and Daikon Dal.

Browse all of our Daikon recipes, and all of our Japanese recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Walnut and Pomegranate Dip

This is a particularly great dip or spread for Autumn. You know that we love our dips and spreads, and this one makes use of our home made pomegranate molasses and the unshelled walnuts that are commonly available in the local area. Pomegranate Molasses makes great dips and spreads when mixed with any nut butter, tahini or miso.

This paste is simple to make using the food processor and easy to pull together when unexpected guests arrive. We love those sorts of recipes.

Similar recipes include Grilled Eggplant with Walnuts and Pomegranate, Broad Bean Dip, Orange and Pecan Cream Cheese, and Green Olive Tapenade.

Browse all of our Dips and Spreads, and our Pomegranate recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Collection: Incredible Slaw Recipes

Coleslaw is part of the Australian vernacular – a ubiquitous dish that appears at every buffet, BBQ and feast. Thinly sliced cabbage with grated vegetables in a delicious creamy dressing. I admit a good coleslaw is worth hovering over.

But slaw, without the cole, can come in many forms. The word comes from the Dutch sla, a shredded or chopped salad of raw vegetables, coated in a dressing (and cole comes from kool which means cabbage).

Crisp vegetables that can be shredded easily are best for slaw.  What comes to mind, in addition to cabbage (green, red, savoy and Chinese or Napa), are carrots, parsnips, cucumbers, radishes (especially long white daikon), celery, celeriac, kohlrabi, onions, zucchini, fennel, turnips, capsicum, snow peas, asparagus, jicama, radicchio, witlof, beetroot, green mango, green papaya and even apples and Asian pears. A true farmer’s market collection.

We have some exciting slaw recipes for you, and only three of them contain cabbage! They are salads for all seasons – don’t restrict yourself to Summer slaws.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Slaw Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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English Mashed Potatoes

When I need comfort food, mashed potato it is.  Reminiscent of childhood — large plates of mashed potato, buttery and herby, steaming hot from the pan and piled with other vegetables — it takes me back to days of large gardens, lazy days, and few cares.

As simple as mashed potatoes is to make, some care is needed otherwise a gluey mash or a dry flavourless pile of potatoes is the result. Here are some tips that might help you to find the perfect mash.

Floury Potatoes: From the English perspective (the French view it differently), it helps to use potatoes with a high starch content and low water and sugar content. Unfortunately it is difficult to determine which potato is which – different sources will list a potato variety as floury in one and as an all-rounder in another. Additionally, potatoes will change their characteristics over time , being more waxy early in the season, and losing starch over time. One way of telling is to mix one part salt to 11 parts water in a measuring jug and add the potato. A floury one will almost always sink to the bottom of the bowl, while a waxy one will float.

The French differ and use a waxy potato for their mashed potato.

Similar recipes include Crushed Potatoes with Roasted Tomatoes and Eggplant, Indian Mashed Potatoes and French Mashed Potatoes.

Browse all of our Potato recipes and some other Mashes. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

This recipe is one of the vegetarian recipes from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. It is cross posted on our sister site, Heat in the Kitchen. It appears there as part of the Retro Recipes series of recipes which documents our vegetarian recipes from that first blog.

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Black Rice (or other Grains) with Curry Leaves and Tomato

There are so many different rices in India – what we see here is one small fraction of the varieties across India. Many varieties are regional and rices are not only white, but brown, black and red too. There are other grains very common in areas, ones that we never hear of here, sadly. For example there are a dozen or more varieties of millet. And here? One or two varieties.

However we can cook our locally grown grains with Indian flavours, there is nothing to stop us doing that, right? For example, I will often cook up a grain with tomatoes, onions, chillies and curry leaves. It is that easy. This method can be used with quinoa, millet, buckwheat, freekeh, pearl barley, many rices, amaranth, and so on. Today I have cooked up a pot of glutinous black rice and given it the same treatment. It is a hearty and gorgeous accompaniment to the meal. Because black rice is quite assertive, we have paired it with more subtle dishes, but if you are using quinoa or moriya, for example, you can boost up the flavour levels of the accompaniments.

BTW India has black rices too, and from what I gather they are very similar to the black rice that we can get from our Asian stores here.

Most people I know associate glutinous rice with a sweet, divine pudding from S. E. Asia. But glutinous rice can be used in savoury dishes as well. I love the nutty crunchiness of it. If you are a kindred spirit in that you love breakfasts that break the mould of cereal-and-toast, then this is the best of breakfast dishes. Black rice is very warming to the body, so it is a great Winter Morning dish. You could add mushrooms.

Similar recipes include Black Rice Congee, and Mushrooms with Black Rice.

Browse all of our Black Rice recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Collection: Loving Turnips

One of the vegetables we developed a late love for is turnips, and here we bring together our favourite turnip recipes, just for you.

Similar collections include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Turnip Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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