Salty Macadamia and Golden Syrup Biscuits | Egg Free

We don’t eat many sweet things around here, especially sweet baked goods – perhaps a little more in Winter than Summer. It is not that we don’t like them (we LOVE them), but biscuits and cakes are basically sugar and butter held together with flour, right? Also, we don’t cook with eggs, so that limits our range as well.

But it is the one of the coldest weeks of Winter as I write, and we are looking for a few more sweet things – rice pudding, apple crumble, golden syrup dumplings, and some biscuits for our cuppa.

I was alerted to this recipe by @CallisClan – she made them one day from a book called Winter on a Farm. The original recipe is here. I have made a slight variation, adding coconut and a little bicarb soda (which adds a little more colour and chewiness to the biscuits). I’ve also sprinkled a little salt over the top before cooking for a delicious sweet-salty taste.

The biscuits are not unlike ANZAC biccies, starting from a base of oats, flour, golden syrup and butter. This combination is so Australian. But the technique and other ingredients differs a little. In ANZAC biscuits, when cooked well, the flour is  partially cooked by the hot butter mix and boiling water. This changes the texture considerably. But in this recipe, the mixture is cooled before adding to the oats and flour. It makes a remarkable difference.

The salt sprinkled over the top of these biscuits is not compulsory and can be omitted.

Similar recipes include Date Tahini Biscuits, Semolina Butter Biscuits, Date Loaf, ANZAC Biscuits, Tahini Biscuits, and Scones.

Or browse all of our Biscuit Recipes.

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Cheesy Butternut Bake in Creamy Sauce with Quince Paste

This is an unusual dish of butternut pumpkin, roasted, then cooked in a creamy cheese sauce with quince paste (membrillo) for a great festive dish.

It is a twist on a quiche in Ottolenghi‘s Plenty More. As we do not cook with eggs, I made this into a dish that is simply the roasted pumpkin baked with cheese and quince paste in a rich creamy sauce. It has been cooked until the top is bubbling and golden. The original recipe is here if you want to make the original.

Similar dishes include: Congee with Butternut, Butternut Tataki with Udon Noodles, and Pumpkin Soup with Lentils.

Or browse all of our Butternut dishes.

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Rustic White Beans in Tomato and Onions

This dish has a vague Turkish origin. White beans – haricot or cannellini beans – are cooked and mixed with a delicious tomato-based mixture. You could make the same dish with chickpeas or lima beans.

I often make it with passata for a real saucy base, but other times will use chopped tomatoes for quite a different style. Your choice.

Similar dishes include Broccoli and White Bean Soup, Fennel and Potato with White Beans and Garlic, and Rustic, Spicy Butter Beans.

Browse all of our White Bean recipes and Turkish dishes.

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Miso Soup with Dried Shiitake, Ginger and Noodles

We love our miso soups and keep several different types of miso in the fridge. Today, weak from an illness, I made a fortifying broth with spices and served with noodles, mushrooms and greens. Delicious.

Similar dishes include How to Make Miso Soup, How to Use Miso, Sweet Potatoes in Coconut Miso, Miso Soup with Wakame, and Hungarian Mushrooms Soup.

Or browse all of our Miso dishes and all of our Soups.

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Throw a Tray of Veggies in the Oven

One of the great things of life is that you can throw a tray of veggies into the oven and have a spectacular meal result.

Toss a collection of vegetables, cut to size to cook for similar times, with some olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and perhaps a spice or herb or two, spread on a tray and bake in a moderate oven.

Eat them hot – a bowl full of hot veggies on the table. Leftovers can be turned into:

  • a salad – chop and mix with fresh greens, or with a lentil or grain (my favourite is freekeh)
  • soups – blitz the veggies, adding your favourites such as herbs, spices, a touch of tahini, cream, yoghurt etc. Or chop and add to a tomato based stock. Lentils and or grains can be added – barley is especially good in Winter. Season well, heat and serve with yummy toppings like crispy garlic, crispy onions, chilli paste, pesto, chilli oil, finely chopped tomato, fennel, and/or onion – whatever you have right now in the kitchen.
  • pastes and spreads – puree with tahini, cream or yoghurt for spreads for sandwiches, toasted sandwiches, crumpets, wraps. Delicious with cheese.
  • dips – make a little thinner than the spreads, and snack with beautiful seeded crackers.

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Warm Barley and Cannellini Salad with Charred Broccolini

For barley lovers, a beautiful salad. Such a simple salad to make, if you are comfortable with soaking and cooking the barley and cannellini beans. To make it even easier, canned beans can be used. Just warm them through before mixing with the barley.

Similar recipes include Toasted Barley and Pistachio Pilaf, Broccolini Risotto, Summery Grain or Lentil Salad, Barley with Pistachios and Raisins, Grain and Grape Salad, and Buckwheat and Broccolini Salad.

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Barley and Vegetable Soup

In the midst of Autumn or Winter, on a foggy, drizzling day, there is nothing more perfect that a large bowl of Vegetable Soup. And if it has barley in it – even better.

Similar recipes include Turnips and Onions, Celeriac Soup with Mustard, Toppings for Soups, Barley and Lentils with Mushrooms, Minestrone with Pesto, Italian Barley and Vegetable Soup, and Thirteen Treasure Happiness Soup.

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Tharuva – Crispy Fried Vegetables | Crispy Fried Potato Slices

Indian snacks, oh my. This is my take on a snack from Bihar and Jharkhand. Tharuva, or Tharua, are vegetables that are crispy fried. Plantain is commonly cooked this way. However, I have made this with potato, beetroot, melons and pumpkin. Harder vegetables I slice very thinly. Others can be cut into strips or cubes.

The vegetables are mixed in a slightly wet mix of rice flour and spices, then shallow or deep fried. Salt can be sprinkled over before serving. You will love them and will find them quite addictive.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Bondas, Vegetable Cutlets, Beetroot Vadai, and Crispy Fried Okra.

Browse all of our Potato recipes and Indian Snacks.

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Cauliflower and Cumin Fritters with Yoghurt Sauce

These are some of the most delicious fritters that we have made. The soft bite of the cauliflower with the spices is a warming mouthful that you won’t forget quickly. Here we have served them with yoghurt with short mung sprouts and herbs.

The recipe appears in 2 books from the Ottolenghi family – Falastin by Sami Tamimi, and Ottoleghi by Ottolenghi and Tamimi. They are the sort of fritter you can have for a meal, as a snack (make them smaller), or packed in a lunch or picnic box.  Or shove them into some pitta bread with hummus and tomato for a great afternoon filler with a cuppa tea.

They keep a couple of days in the fridge (think – after school snack), and are best eaten either at room temperature or heated slightly in a warm oven. The batter will also keep a couple of days in the fridge if you want to cook on demand.

“These are not your usual fritters,” says cookbook author Yotam Ottolenghi. These are packed with cauliflower and spiced with cinnamon, cumin and turmeric. As a dipping sauce, he serves a spiked Greek yoghurt.

Of course, I have switched out the eggs in Tamimi’s recipe for my usual egg replacer in friters – 1 Tblspn chickpea flour, 1 Tbslpn or a bit less of cream and about 0.25 plain or lemon eno per egg.

Similar recipes include Roasted Cauliflower Tahini Puree, Buckwheat Upma, Crispy Couscous and Saffron Cakes, Sweet Potato Fritters, Mung Bean Flour Fritters, and Pakora.

Browse all of our Fritter recipes, and all of our Snacks. Our Tamami recipes are here, and the dishes from Falastin are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More.

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Horse Gram Rasam

Horse Gram (aka Kulthi Bean) should be the next superfood. It is rich in nutrients and its many positive effects on the body. They say that it clears the throat and the sinuses which is why it is very comforting if you have a cold or cough. It is also so flavoursome that just adding pepper and salt to the water that horsegram is cooked in, and drinking it every day will provide nutritional benefits and might even help to to shed weight. So they say.

Read more about Horse Gram. It is easily purchased in Indian shops.

The beauty of rasam is that it can be as simple as water simmered with tamarind and spices, or as heady as lentil based tomato rasam with lots of spices and a small amount of vegetables. Today’s Rasam uses both the horse gram lentils and the cooking water, but see the notes below the recipe for an alternative approach – the cooking water can be used and the drained lentils used to make a sundal.

Similar dishes include Sprouts Usal, Tomato Rasam with Lime, and Tomato and Dal Peppery Rasam.

Browse all of our Horse Gram recipes and all of our Rasams. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Winter recipes.

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