Puy, Beluga or Horse Gram Lentil Stew with Aubergine

For this divine Wintery lentil stew, an earthy, dark lentil is called for. Puy lentils are a common choice, and the dark Beluga is excellent. I also love to make it with either Horse Gram or Matki lentils – brown, earthy and delicious lentils that you can get from your Indian shop. How good these are.

Despite the very familiar ingredients, the result is a bit magic and unexpected. It is an O. M. G. dish. The texture of the lentils with the silkiness of the eggplant. The pop of the tomato flavour, the way the sour cream enhances the dish, the heat of the chilli and the Greekness of the oregano.

Serve as it is, for a light meal, or bulk it up by spooning on top of rice, on slices of grilled or toasted sourdough. You can serve the stew either as a hearty starter or a side, or as a main served with any grain you like. It can be made up to three days ahead and kept in the fridge–just warm through then add the creme fraiche, oil, chilli flakes and oregano before serving. It’s at its best served warm, but is also very good at room temperature.

This is an Ottolenghi recipe – or at least it was until I, naturally, played with it a little. The key change was in the lentil used, but if you like you can check the original recipe. We always feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area, or to massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry.

Similar recipes include Beluga Lentil Salad with Pomegranate Molasses, Citrusy Beetroot with Puy Lentils, and Horse Gram Dal.

Browse our Horse Gram, Puy, Beluga and Aubergine recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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Aama Vadai

Aama Vadai (also calledΒ Paruppu Vadai or Masala Vadai) is a traditional snack that is made during Tamil New Year and also Ramnavami. Made from a variety of lentils and spiced with chillies, asafoetida, curry leaves and coriander, it is a delicious snack. It is also a very popular street food snack in South India.

Aama means tortoise in Tamil. But never fear, they do not contain tortoises, it is named this way because of the hard crispy outer shell of the vadai.

Similar recipes include Vadai with Yoghurt, Broad Bean and Mint Vada, Thattai Vada, and Pea and Mint Croquettes.

Browse more Vadai recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

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Aamti with Drumsticks and Coconut | Maharashtrian Dal

Aamti is a lentil dish from Maharashtra that is made with toor dal and defined by its souring agent – tomato or tamarind – as well as cumin, chillies or chilli powder and fenugreek. Aamti also contains Goda Masala or, if that is not available, Garam Masala can be used.

This is the second of our Aamti recipes. In this one we have included drumstick vegetables to add texture and flavour. If you are not familiar with Drumsticks, they are long, thin and tapered vegetables that grow on a tree. Their outer skin cannot be eaten as it is fibrous and tough. It is the inner pulp and seeds that are delicious and add flavour to dishes. Consequently, the pieces of drumsticks are sucked between the teeth to extract the inner goodness. It might sound strange, but I know that once you have tasted drumsticks you will be addicted.

Aamti is very easy to make if your toor dal is already cooked (I keep cooked toor dal in the freezer), and your drumsticks are already cooked (our friends provide us with drumsticks and I freeze them too). If so, it will take under 10 minutes. This recipe comes from Sukham Ayu, a book by Jigyasa Giri on Auyrvedic cooking at home. I have added my own tweaks, of course.

Similar recipes include Aamti Bhaat, Poritha Kootu, and Dal Tadka.

Browse all of our Dals and all of our Maharasthrian recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Collection: Delicious and Addictive Indian Snacks

I admit it. I am addicted to Indian snacks. Who isn’t?

I have put together some of my favourites in this collection. I hope you enjoy them.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Green Mango Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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Five More Winter Dishes I Love

What comfort our list of go-to recipes bring us. In the Five Dishes series we are bringing you some of our most love dishes. We explore our recipes, some of them going back decades.

Today I am bringing five of my favourite dishes of Winter. I do hope you enjoy them.

You can also browse all of our Winter dishes – ones for Early Winter, Mid Winter and Late Winter.

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Red Rice – Rice in Tomato Juice

Remember Rice-a-Riso? It seems it is still being made and sold in supermarkets, but only in Chicken flavour. As a teenager and young adult I loved the tomato one. Imagine my surprise when I first made this dish and it tasted exactly like tomato rice-a-riso. It was a nostalgic moment.

This recipe is very simple, but because it is versatile I need to walk you through a few things first.

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Spicy Beluga Lentils | Black Lentils with Yoghurt

We quite adore Beluga Lentils – they are named beluga as they are supposed to look like little beads of caviar. I wouldn’t really know about that, but do know they are both delicious and easy to turn into a gorgeous dish. They cook quickly, and they hold their shape. They can be used instead of French Green Lentils/Puy Lentils in any dish.

This dish is eeeeasy, with spices toasted, onion and garlic sweated off, and then lentils added and cooked. It can be made ahead of time, finishing off with the yoghurt and sour elements at the time of serving. It can also be frozen at that point, for those late nights especially after a long working day.

Make double the amount of lentils, if you wish, and keep them for salads. They make gorgeous bases for lentils salads.

Similar recipes include Beluga Lentil Stew with Eggplant, Puy Lentils with Asparagus and Watercress, Citrusy Beetroot with Lentils, and Crushed Puy Lentils with Tahini and Yoghurt.

Browse all of our Beluga Lentil dishes. Or be inspired by our Late Winter recipes.

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Five of My Favourite Winter Dishes

We have so many favourite dishes in our household, ones that make a reappearance upon request or when a yearning arises.

Today I am bringing you five of my favourite dishes of Winter. I do hope you enjoy them.

You can also browse all of our Winter dishes – ones for Early Winter, Mid Winter and Late Winter.

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Sri Lankan Pumpkin Curry with Roasted Coconut

Sri Lanka cuisine includes beautiful curries cooked in coconut milk, showing off the abundance of coconuts on this beautiful isle. This is another version of the Sri Lankan Pumpkin Curry, and in this one the flavours of coconut are layered with both roasted coconut and coconut milk. The recipe is adapted from Flavours of Sri Lanka.

Similar recipes include Sri Lankan Pineapple Curry, Green Mango in Coconut Milk, Sri Lankan Okra Curry with Coconut Milk, and Aubergines in Coconut Milk.

Or browse our Pumpkin recipes and all of our Sri Lankan dishes. Our Indian recipes are here, and Indian Essentials here. Otherwise, explore our Late Winter collection of recipes.

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Collection: Very Special Turmeric Recipes

Turmeric is still the super food of the moment, and that has lead to some terrible misuses of this special spice. In small amounts it adds a special flavour to a dish. In large amounts it is bitter and unpalatable. The key to consuming turmeric is to add a little to each dish you cook – half a tspn is enough.

Today we have our favourite turmeric recipes for you. In addition to these, know that most Indian dishes also include turmeric, so explore them as well. I do hope you love and enjoy these recipes too.

Other Collections include:

Browse all of our Turmeric recipes, and explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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