Black Onions – Onions Slow Roasted

Black onions sound intriguing, don’t they? Well they are. Onions, sauteed then cooked with vinegar and sugar until brown and crispy in a low oven. Sweet with a touch of sour and deep oniony flavours, they are the perfect topping for soups, salads and dals. They go well in sandwiches, rolls and wraps. Mix with chopped herbs and top rice with them. Mix into pasta dishes. Use them for lunches, snacks and dinner dishes.

The black onions keep well so they can be made and will last a week in the fridge. They are not burnt but rather are deeply caramelised.

Similar recipes include Lentils and Pasta with Caramelised Onions, Broad Bean Dip with Roasted Onions, and Urad Dal with Onions Four Ways.

Browse all of our Onion recipes or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Life-Changing Fried Cauliflower with Mint and Tamarind Dipping Sauce

Some vegetables that have a poor reputation because they have been over cooked or over-boiled in the past, have redeemed their reputations through roasting or frying. I am thinking of Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower particularly, also Broccoli. I do love Cauli and Broccoli steamed gently but I also have nightmare recollections of how my mother cooked them.

Today we have a life-altering Cauliflower recipe for you. This is REALLY GOOD, and you won’t believe it is vegetarian. Fool your friends!

In this recipe, cauliflower is deep fried in a spicy batter and breadcrumbs, then it is dipped in a sauce made from herbs and tamarind. The original recipe is one of Ottolenghi‘s from Plenty More, but I have changed the batter so that it does not contain eggs. Chickpea flour batter makes an excellent batter for deep frying and we have used that. I have also made the batter spicy and left the breadcrumbs plain. We always feel free to substitute ingredients in Ottolenghi recipes that are not readily available in our local area, or to massage them to suit what is available in our garden and pantry. Seek out his original recipe in the book to compare – I can’t find a version online.

Similar recipes include Cauliflower Roasted in Olive Oil, Cauliflower Fry, and Crispy Cauliflower with Capers.

Browse all of our Cauliflower recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here and here are the recipes from Plenty More. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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A Huge Collection of the Best Ever Chickpea Recipes

Chickpeas, and the flour made from ground chickpeas feature strongly in our kitchen.  Today we want to share with you our most favourite chickpea and chickpea flour recipes. Many of these recipes have been on our kitchen’s menu for over 20 years! They have been shared via our previous blog Food Matters from 1995 – 2006, in person with friends, and through this blog that has been running from 2006.  The older recipes of course don’t show the fashionable food styling that is current today, but here we believe in food for sustenance, food for flavour, and healthy food to keep the body healthy. We are not so much about food for entertainment. I do hope you enjoy.

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English Mashed Potatoes

When I need comfort food, mashed potato it is.  Reminiscent of childhood — large plates of mashed potato, buttery and herby, steaming hot from the pan and piled with other vegetables — it takes me back to days of large gardens, lazy days, and few cares.

As simple as mashed potatoes is to make, some care is needed otherwise a gluey mash or a dry flavourless pile of potatoes is the result. Here are some tips that might help you to find the perfect mash.

Floury Potatoes: From the English perspective (the French view it differently), it helps to use potatoes with a high starch content and low water and sugar content. Unfortunately it is difficult to determine which potato is which – different sources will list a potato variety as floury in one and as an all-rounder in another. Additionally, potatoes will change their characteristics over time , being more waxy early in the season, and losing starch over time. One way of telling is to mix one part salt to 11 parts water in a measuring jug and add the potato. A floury one will almost always sink to the bottom of the bowl, while a waxy one will float.

The French differ and use a waxy potato for their mashed potato.

Similar recipes include Crushed Potatoes with Roasted Tomatoes and Eggplant, Indian Mashed Potatoes and French Mashed Potatoes.

Browse all of our Potato recipes and some other Mashes. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

This recipe is one of the vegetarian recipes from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. It is cross posted on our sister site, Heat in the Kitchen. It appears there as part of the Retro Recipes series of recipes which documents our vegetarian recipes from that first blog.

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Black Rice (or other Grains) with Curry Leaves and Tomato

There are so many different rices in India – what we see here is one small fraction of the varieties across India. Many varieties are regional and rices are not only white, but brown, black and red too. There are other grains very common in areas, ones that we never hear of here, sadly. For example there are a dozen or more varieties of millet. And here? One or two varieties.

However we can cook our locally grown grains with Indian flavours, there is nothing to stop us doing that, right? For example, I will often cook up a grain with tomatoes, onions, chillies and curry leaves. It is that easy. This method can be used with quinoa, millet, buckwheat, freekeh, pearl barley, many rices, amaranth, and so on. Today I have cooked up a pot of glutinous black rice and given it the same treatment. It is a hearty and gorgeous accompaniment to the meal. Because black rice is quite assertive, we have paired it with more subtle dishes, but if you are using quinoa or moriya, for example, you can boost up the flavour levels of the accompaniments.

BTW India has black rices too, and from what I gather they are very similar to the black rice that we can get from our Asian stores here.

Most people I know associate glutinous rice with a sweet, divine pudding from S. E. Asia. But glutinous rice can be used in savoury dishes as well. I love the nutty crunchiness of it. If you are a kindred spirit in that you love breakfasts that break the mould of cereal-and-toast, then this is the best of breakfast dishes. Black rice is very warming to the body, so it is a great Winter Morning dish. You could add mushrooms.

Similar recipes include Black Rice Congee, and Mushrooms with Black Rice.

Browse all of our Black Rice recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Collection: Loving Turnips

One of the vegetables we developed a late love for is turnips, and here we bring together our favourite turnip recipes, just for you.

Similar collections include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Turnip Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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Puy, Beluga or Horse Gram Lentil Stew with Aubergine

For this divine Wintery lentil stew, an earthy, dark lentil is called for. Puy lentils are a common choice, and the dark Beluga is excellent. I also love to make it with either Horse Gram or Matki lentils – brown, earthy and delicious lentils that you can get from your Indian shop. How good these are.

Despite the very familiar ingredients, the result is a bit magic and unexpected. It is an O. M. G. dish. The texture of the lentils with the silkiness of the eggplant. The pop of the tomato flavour, the way the sour cream enhances the dish, the heat of the chilli and the Greekness of the oregano.

Serve as it is, for a light meal, or bulk it up by spooning on top of rice, on slices of grilled or toasted sourdough. You can serve the stew either as a hearty starter or a side, or as a main served with any grain you like. It can be made up to three days ahead and kept in the fridge–just warm through then add the creme fraiche, oil, chilli flakes and oregano before serving. It’s at its best served warm, but is also very good at room temperature.

This is an Ottolenghi recipe – or at least it was until I, naturally, played with it a little. The key change was in the lentil used, but if you like you can check the original recipe. We always feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area, or to massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry.

Similar recipes include Beluga Lentil Salad with Pomegranate Molasses, Citrusy Beetroot with Puy Lentils, and Horse Gram Dal.

Read more about Horse Gram (aks Kulthi Bean). It is easily purchased in Indian shops.

Browse our Horse Gram, Puy, Beluga and Aubergine recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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Aama Vadai

Aama Vadai (also called Paruppu Vadai or Masala Vadai) is a traditional snack that is made during Tamil New Year and also Ramnavami. Made from a variety of lentils and spiced with chillies, asafoetida, curry leaves and coriander, it is a delicious snack. It is also a very popular street food snack in South India.

Aama means tortoise in Tamil. But never fear, they do not contain tortoises, it is named this way because of the hard crispy outer shell of the vadai.

Similar recipes include Vadai with Yoghurt, Broad Bean and Mint Vada, Thattai Vada, and Pea and Mint Croquettes.

Browse more Vadai recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

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Aamti with Drumsticks and Coconut | Maharashtrian Dal

Aamti is a lentil dish from Maharashtra that is made with toor dal and defined by its souring agent – tomato or tamarind – as well as cumin, chillies or chilli powder and fenugreek. Aamti also contains Goda Masala or, if that is not available, Garam Masala can be used.

This is the second of our Aamti recipes. In this one we have included drumstick vegetables to add texture and flavour. If you are not familiar with Drumsticks, they are long, thin and tapered vegetables that grow on a tree. Their outer skin cannot be eaten as it is fibrous and tough. It is the inner pulp and seeds that are delicious and add flavour to dishes. Consequently, the pieces of drumsticks are sucked between the teeth to extract the inner goodness. It might sound strange, but I know that once you have tasted drumsticks you will be addicted.

Aamti is very easy to make if your toor dal is already cooked (I keep cooked toor dal in the freezer), and your drumsticks are already cooked (our friends provide us with drumsticks and I freeze them too). If so, it will take under 10 minutes. This recipe comes from Sukham Ayu, a book by Jigyasa Giri on Auyrvedic cooking at home. I have added my own tweaks, of course.

Similar recipes include Aamti Bhaat, Poritha Kootu, and Dal Tadka.

Browse all of our Dals and all of our Maharasthrian recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Collection: Delicious and Addictive Indian Snacks

I admit it. I am addicted to Indian snacks. Who isn’t?

I have put together some of my favourites in this collection. I hope you enjoy them.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Green Mango Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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