Bannock | Scottish Girdle/ Griddle Oatcakes

Bannock, or Scottish Girdle (aka Griddle) Bread, is cooked in on a griddle or in a skillet from a simple dough. They can be cooked on the stove, on the BBQ or on a campfire! It is similar to a griddle baked scone – it has a fluffy centre that is slightly crumbly – and is best eaten with lashings of butter and jam. It can be cooked cut into circles, squares, wedges or left as a whole “bread”.

The word bannock comes from a Latin word that means “baked dough”. It originated in Scotland, where it was first made as a quite heavy and dense loaf with a barley or oatmeal dough and no leavening. As leavening agents were introduced, they began to be added to these skillet breads, making them fluffier. We keep somewhat traditional and make them with oatmeal and a little plain flour, but you will find modern recipes that use only flour.

So easy to make, so delicious, good weekend food.

Similar recipes include Griddle Scones, Singin’ Hinny, and Home Made Crumpets.

Browse all of our Oat recipes and all of our Griddle cooking recipes . Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

This is a vegetarian recipe from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. You can browse other recipes from this blog in our Retro Recipes series.

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Plantain Chips

One of my enduring memories of Kerala is the proliferation of freshly cooked plantain chips – delicious deep fried slices of raw banana, crispy and salty. Even when I was staying in Mylapore in Chennai, the wallah was making huge woks-full of fresh plantain chips right there on the street, so you’d get them straight from the pan.

They can be made at home of course – quite easily in fact. Just like the street wallahs, you can slice the plantain right into the hot oil if it is safe to do so. Otherwise slice them onto a plate and add to the oil. As they cook the flavourings are added to the layer of chips, or they can be salted as they come out of the pan. Madhur Jaffrey also adds curry leaves and green chilli to the oil before removing the chips – the oil does erupt a bit when you do this so I often leave it out. You can add chilli powder to the chips as they come out of the oil if you wish.

Similar recipes include Paprika Oven Chips, Polenta Crisps and Potato Wedges.

Browse all of our Indian Snacks and all of our Plantain recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Minestrone di Pasta e Ceci | Minestrone with Pasta and Chickpeas

I have always loved pasta with chickpeas – a pretty classic dish in this household. There is something about the texture of the chickpeas with the pasta that is wonderful. And of course a pasta dish seems really healthy with all those chickpeas.

This recipe brings pasta and chickpeas together again, this time in a classic Minestrone. Use smaller pasta for this soup – small shells or small rounds of pasta like anelli or ditalini.

Similar recipes include Genoese Minestrone, Borlotti Bean and Pasta Soup, and Chickpea and Parsley Soup with Turmeric.

Browse all of our Minestrone recipes and all of our Soups. Or explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Banana Porridge with Glazed Apples, Golden Syrup and Passionfruit

Glazed apples are delicious and endlessly versatile. We have made them before, and used them to top porridge. They can also be used to top any pudding, syrupy cakes or endless desserts. Sit atop some junket, for example. Or over icecream, with grilled banana, on top of a fruit salad, topping a bowl of yoghurt. Any way you like.

Bill Grainger in his book Sydney Food has glazed apples with Banana Porridge. We hinted at it in our last recipe.  Today we get more specific about how to make that porridge, with our own twist, of course. It really is delicious, and so Australian!

One of the major changes is that we have added passionfruit. It is a very Australian thing, but also the sour notes of the passionfruit cut through the sweetness of the apples and porridge.

Try this as well – Baked Apples with Star Anise, Apples with Lemon and Cinnamon, and Apples Baked in Marsala.

Browse our Apple recipes here, our Breakfast dishes and our Desserts too, or find some inspiration in our Late Winter recipes.

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100 Vegetables: #8. Avarakkai Beans | Indian Flat Beans

Avarakkai Beans are peculiar to India and I have only ever seen them fresh in Adelaide on one occasion. So for this 8th vegetable in our series, there is only one recipe. They might be available frozen in Indian groceries but I haven’t checked.

Avarakkai Beans are also called Indian Broad Beans, and interestingly, if you google them, google returns only recipes for the Western broad bean. Other names for the beans include Hyacinth Beans and Lablab Beans.

You can browse all of our Avarakkai Beans recipes here. And check out our 100 Vegetable Series.

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Winter Teas to Cheer Your Day

Once the heat of Summer and the warmth of Autumn die away we stop making fruit juices so often and turn to miso soups, and teas and infusions to warm our days and provide relaxing interludes. Here are some more, mainly infusions, to spark up your cold wet winter weather and get rid of the rainy day blues.

Similar recipes include Fennel Tea, Tulsai Chai, and Garam Chai.

Browse all of our Teas and especially our Chais. Or explore all of our Late Autumn dishes.

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Orange and Date Salad | Sweet Orange Salad

Orange salads are very common in the Middle East and places like Morocco, and suit our Winter very well. This is a different take on them – usually Orange Salads are savoury, but this one is sweet with a little sugar, cinnamon and dates. Delicious! Serve at the end of a meal for a beautiful and healthy final course, or serve in the afternoon with a strong cuppa tea. We also find it a great dish to put on a breakfast table.

Similar dishes include Orange and Carrot SaladOranges with Radishes, and Orange and Date Salad with Fennel Orange Dressing.

Or browse all of our Orange Salads, and our Date dishes. Alternatively, take some time to explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Penne with Walnuts, Gorgonzola and Sage

Pasta is that comforting dish that is generally easy to make and forms a perfect Friday Night or quick weekend meal. It takes 10 or 11 minutes to cook the pasta, and the creamy accompaniments are ready to be tossed with it. Perfect! It is also good for when a friend pops in unexpectedly at lunch time.

It is mildly flavoured and goes really well with a green salad, herb salad or just some bitter leaves of Belgian endive or rocket.

Similar recipes include Penne with Ricotta and Broad Beans, Rocket Salad with Penne and Parmesan, and Pasta Salad with Artichoke Hearts.

Browse all of our Pasta dishes, and all of our Penne recipes. Our Italian dishes are here. Or browse all of our Early Summer recipes.

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Collection: Delicious Wintery Congee Recipes

Congee conjours up wintery days and long slow cooking of rice, beans, lentils and/or grains on the stove top. They can be cooked slowly in the oven also – imaging an overnight slow slow cooked congee ready for breakfast when you finally emerge from the doona. One of the delights of Winter is congee.

Jook is another name for congee. I hear that jook means “arrow.” I don’t know about that but a warm satisfying bowl of congee sure goes straight to the heart. When cooked, congee should be soupy, a little runny, not thick enough to hold a spoon. But there’s no standard for consistency, so it’s perfect when it’s as you like it. It will thicken on standing, but can be thinned with some water or stock.

Congee is perfect for breakfast, if you can get up early enough to cook it. Or cook in a low oven overnight. But it also goes down well at any time of the day, especially a cold Winter’s day. I like it best cooked in a Chinese clay pot – it makes a difference and I keep one just for congee.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Congee Recipes, Kitchari dishes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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Collection: Tomato Sauces, Purees and Jams

Winter comes, and suddenly we are looking for sauces of all sorts to make soup out of, add to lentil braises, vegetable stews, gratins, dipping sauces, and other dishes. Luckily I make several of these each Autumn so that they are frozen in zip lock bags, ready for the first Wintery dish that needs them.

Some of these sauces are the sort of sauce that you put on your (vegetarian) bangers and mash or over your BBQ’d veggies and patties. Most of these sauces are fine for that use, but the other purpose of these sauces is to add flavour to dishes, or form the base for soups, other sauces, and dipping sauces for snacks.

Enjoy these 7 or so different Tomato Sauce recipes. And don’t forget that you can pre-make these in Autumn when the tomatoes are at their best, and freeze them for those cold rainy days.

Similar articles include 30 Soups for Mid Autumn, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Tomato Sauce Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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