Hot and Sour Mushroom Soup

Recently in the kitchen we have renewed our love affair with miso soup. While others will tell you to spend time making stocks and broths for miso soup, and cook any number of ingredients, I have a wonderful, never-fail, 5 minute approach to making miso soup. The secret is, there is little that needs to be pre-cooked for miso soup. The most I do is to soak some cute little beancurd bows (but even the pre-soaking can be skipped), and perhaps some noodles. They soak while the kettle boils and the ingredients are sliced. Mix miso with hot water until dissolved, pour into a lovely bowl, add the thinly sliced ingredients and a few other flavour enhancers (see my post), the noodles if using, the beancurd perhaps, and sip contentedly. Deep flavours, comfort and nourishment. What more could you want?

Ottolenghi’s approach to what I consider to be his version of my miso soup (without using miso, let me be clear). Yet his is faaaar more complicated. It is a kitchen-sink style approach. Perhaps he should use miso! He considers this recipe to be a variation on Asian soups such as Thai tom yum or Vietnamese pho. The key is the stock, which must be rich and hearty, with many layers of flavour. And, miso or not, the broth is extraordinary! Hot and sour as promised. Earthy and deep, yet with a lightness too. It was a real surprise.  Make double and freeze half.

He doesn’t add noodles, but you can. I recommend making double the amount of broth, make the mushroom soup as-is, then decide how to use the second half with the noodles. Mushrooms and noodles. Greens and noodles. Fried tofu and noodles.

It’s interesting to me that he doesn’t include dried shiitake mushrooms in the stock (and sliced for the soup). Dried Shiitake are a vegetarian’s best friend when it comes to dark, flavoursome broths. Anyway, this is how I make an Asian Stock that is so delicious it is worth keeping some in the fridge and freezer, and using it for whatever you are making – rice, risotto, noodles, …. Ottolenghi’s is rather similar, come to think of it. But my broth is light and summery, his is deep and earthy.

You’ve guessed it, this is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More. In fact, it is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often slightly massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry.

Similar recipes include Slightly Pickled Mushrooms with Tamari and Sesame.

Browse all of our Soups and all of our Mushroom recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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A Simple Bean Sprout Stir Fry with Spices | Bean Sprout Sundal

A quick dish, great for when you need to eat healthy but don’t have a lot of time.

Sometimes life throws us curveballs. In such times, it is great to stay intent on what keeps use healthy and focused. Simple and great food that is full of goodness is the best way to go.

Eat well at any time, and lift it to the next level when life is tough.

You might also like to try Black Gram Sprouts Sundal, Sweet Corn Sundal, Adzuki Bean Sundal, Sprouted Green Gram Sundal, and White Pea Sundal. Or you can make a Sundal with du Puy Lentils or some Mung Dal, equally as delicious.

Explore all of the Sundal Recipes, they are all quick and gorgeous. Sundals can also be used as prasadam and neivedyam for Navaratri or Ganesha Chaturthi and other Hindu Festivals. Click the links for other recipes for these festivals. Or explore our collection of Indian recipes. Our Indian Essentials are here.

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Spicy Crunchy Herby Salad with Asian Style Dressing

This is a salad to wake you up and enliven your senses. Fueled with chilli, then the heat is softened (a little) with herbs and crunchy ingredients, and then it is dressed with Asian ingredients.

This is a salad to wake you up and enliven your senses. Fueled with chilli, then the heat is softened (a little) with herbs and crunchy ingredients, and then it is dressed with Asian ingredients. Better than coffee, you will be full of energy in no time! 😀😘

You might also like to try Peaches with Asian Flavours, Caramelised, Marinated King Oyster Mushrooms, or Sprouted Mung Bean Sundal/Salad. Browse our Carrot Salads here, and Salads here and here. Be inspired by our Summer recipes here and here.

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Stir Fried Mung Bean Sprouts | Mooga Usili

Fantastically quick and easy for a snack or side dish. Enjoy!

This dish is an Indian stir fry using whole Mung Dal or Mung Beans – those green round unhulled lentils that are less common than their sisters, the yellow, skinned, split mung dal.

First the mung is sprouted by soaking them and then keeping them moist for a few days. When the mung have sprouted, they are stirfried with spices.

You could try this with purchased mung bean sprouts. It would be a slightly different dish because the sprouts are left to grow longer and the beans themselves will be softer.

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