100 Vegetables: #42. Cumquats

The cumquats are ripening on the trees as I put this collection together and it has been a great reminder of the wonderful produce from this little-used citrus fruit. What a great little workhorse it is.

You can browse all of our Cumquat recipes here. And check out our 100 Vegetable Series.

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Cumquat and Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Seed Syrup

We’ve been making lime pickles from the Makrut Limes (formally known as Kaffir Limes) from our tree. There are an awful lot of seeds in the limes. We don’t like to waste anything, and I also had a couple of dozen cumquats I was looking to use. The seeds from the limes are full of pectin, so I simmered them with the pulp that was left after juicing the cumquats. After straining, it made the most wonderful syrup.

The taste is sweet with citrus-bitter, a little like marmalade. It is almost set but now quite – a perfect consistency for toast and crumpets, and also for drizzling over rice pudding, Besan Payasam, icecream and other desserts. It is also a great drizzle over Brussels Sprouts and other veggies before roasting, onto soups, curries, rice etc.

Of course you won’t have lime seeds at your disposal. Make it anyway, just leave the seeds out. Or you can try with lemon seeds or seeds of other citrus. Add just enough sugar to retain the taste but overcome any sharp sour or bitter tastes. (You want to keep a little sour and a little bitter, don’t eliminate it altogether. We are not used to bitter tastes in our cuisines, but they are wonderful when used in the right way.)

Similar dishes include Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup, Cumquat Tea, and Cumquat Chutney.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes and all of our Lime dishes. Our Syrups are here. Or explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Cumquat Mango Chutney with Kalonji

I make a cumquat chutney which is quite divine and these Pickled Cumquats, but this year I wanted to make something a little different. So I took the ideas from the pickle to make this chutney that is sweetened with mango puree. Not only is it mango puree, it is alphonso mango puree, the king of mangoes. You can use any mango puree of course, but I saw some alphonso at my local Asian shop for the first time the other day, so I had to grab some.

If you want to make your own mango puree, please go ahead. There are still plenty of ripe mangoes in the shops if you know where to look (try good Asian groceries). The delight of using mango puree is that it adds a sweet element against the tartness of the cumquats. Add chilli, and you have a hot-sweet-sour chutney which is incredibly additive.

It takes about 45 cumquats to make this chutney, and can be made in 30 mins once you have sliced and seeded the cumquats. We really adore it.

Similar recipes include Cumquat and Lime Seed Syrup, Peach and Barberry Chutney, Coriander, Coconut and Gram Chutney, Cumquat Chutney, Easy Pickled Cumquats, and Cumquats in Gin.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes and all of our Chutneys. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Turmeric Cauliflower with Cumquats and Chilli-Orange Sauce

Although it might sound unusual to cook cauliflower with oranges, it is not unknown in Indian and relatively common in China. This is an Indian dish in which I have found a use for the abundance of cumquats in our garden. The oranges adds a beautiful sweetness to the dish while the cumquats balance the sweetness by adding a delightful sweet-sour tang. The cauliflower is coated in turmeric and sauteed before adding to the sauce.

Similar dishes include Pepper and Turmeric Cauliflower, Roasted Cauliflower with Cumin and Sumac, Roasted Cauliflower with Green Tahini Dressing, Cauliflower Fry, and Cauliflower Roasted with Black Mustard Seed.

Browse all of our Cauliflower dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

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Roasted Cauliflower with a Citrus Chilli Tomato Sauce

Who else can eat half a cauliflower by themselves? If the dish is delicious it is all I might make for a meal, and between the two of us a whole cauli will disappear. This is one of those recipes. I make it with any of my tomato sauces that are sitting in the freezer, so it is an incredibly easy dish to pull together. Great for coming home late from work or a day out – it can be on the table in about 30 mins if you prepare the cauli quickly. (Or chop it ready to roast before you go out.)

Similar recipes include French Tomato Sauce, Turmeric Cauliflower with Chilli-Orange Dressing, Roasted Cauliflower with Cumin and Sumac, Cauliflower Roasted in Olive Oil, and Crispy Cauliflower with Capers.

Browse all of our Cauliflower recipes and all of our Roasted Cauliflower dishes. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Roasted Cumquats with Flowering Thyme on Besan Custard (Payasam) and Passion Fruit Syrup

One of our cumquat trees is hanging heavy with fruit, looking gorgeous in the Autumn sun. The other one is covered in flowers! Go figure the timing! It is a different variety though, so perhaps that accounts for it.

We use a lot of cumquats, loving cumquat tea, poached cumquats, cumquat jam, cumquat pickles and  many other ways of using them.  I saw a house with a cumquat tree hedge recently, and I have just gone wild thinking about how I can do that at my place!

Today we are roasting the cumquats, and using them with some of our thyme that is flowering in the garden, and the seeds and juice of passion fruit, and sitting it all on an eggless custard type mixture that I love to make. I call it Indian custard, but its real name is Besan Payasam.

BTW, In Australia we spell passionfruit as one word. They are abundant here and we take them for granted. We eat them fresh from the garden, we use the pulp for our national dish Pavlova, and we used to drink Passiona soft drink by the litre back in the day.

Similar dishes include Kasa Kasa Payasam, Cumquat Mango Chutney, Sago Payasam, Pandan Rice Pudding with Lime Syrup and Fruits, and  Cumquats and Gin.

Browse all of our Cumquat dishes and our Dessert Recipes. Or simply explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup

Take these little balls of tangy sweetness and serve with pudding, baked sweet rice or over a sweet syrupy cake. They go well with icecream, or just with some creme fraiche or thick yoghurt. Chop them up and through them into salads or mix through rice. These are so good! They are exceptional accompaniments to hot Indian curries.

Similar recipes include Cumquat Mango Chutney, Roasted Cumquats with Flowering Thyme, Indian French Toast with Baked Strawberries, Cumquat Chutney, Cumquat Marmalade, and Cumquats in Gin.

Browse all of our Cumquat dishes, and all of our Desserts. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Easy Cumquat Marmalade

Beautiful cumquats make beautiful jam, and so it is to the stove top that we turn this morning. Some cherry tomatoes are drying in the oven, taking the chill off of the kitchen, and we chop, soak and simmer cumquats before turning them into the most delicious marmalade. Breakfasts are going to be amazing this month!

This jam is also an exceptional accompaniment to hot Indian curries. The sweetness tempers the heat of the dish, and the cumquat tartness is beautiful with the spices.

Similar recipes include Easy Summery Breakfast and Brunch Ideas, Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup, Cumquats in Gin, Cumquats Pickle, Cumquat Olive Oil, and Cumquat Vanilla Marmalade.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes, and our other Jam recipes. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Broad Bean and Tomato Salad

Spring brings us Broad Beans. Celebrate their freshness with this salad.

Oh the joy of Spring. Two pieces of that joy are the short season of the Broad Bean, and the arrival of ripe cumquats. Today we celebrate the Broad Bean with a quick salad.

Larger Broad Beans need to be twice peeled. That is, they are first removed from the pod, of course, and then each bean has their thick outer shell removed. This seems like a lot of work, but once you are on a roll, it happens quickly. I use a small, sharp knife to knick the outer skin, then a quick peel and the inner bean pops out. The inner bean is much gentler in taste, very delicious.

You can also make this salad at other times of the year – just use frozen broad beans, easily available from your supermarket. You can find them peeled and unpeeled. Go for the peeled ones if you can find them – much easier and definitely quicker.

Are you looking for similar recipes? Try Fava Bean Salad with Garlic and Dill, Green Papaya, Snake Bean and Tomato Salad, Broad Bean and Dill Rice Orecchiette with Broad Beans, Broad Beans with Feta and Preserved Lemon, Broad Beans MezzeEnsalada, Spring Pasta with Broad Beans and Mint, Broad Beans with Fresh Pecorino, and Pan Fried Broad Bean Salad.

Browse all of our Broad Bean recipes, our Tomato Salads, and all of our Salads. And explore our Mid Spring dishes.

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Cumquat Rasam | Kumquat Rasam | Sweet, Sour, Hot, Delicious

Rasam, that tangy, spicy, soup-like liquid of South India, is commonly made from lemons, limes and oranges, so, with a surfeit of cumquats in the kitchen, we made a delicious Cumquat Rasam to eat over rice.

You may be wondering what a Rasam is. It is a soup-like dish which can be thick or thin, and is usually eaten as part of a meal and served with rice – read more about Rasam here.

Similar recipes include Lime Rasam, Kottu Rasam, Pepper Rasam, Lemon Rasam, and and Tomato Rasam. Also try Easy Cumquat Marmalade.

I’ve been discussing the spelling of Cumquat with others. In many places it is spelled Kumquat, but the British (and Australian) spelling is Cumquat. Surprisingly, in India, which has followed the British spellings in other things, has chosen Kumquat. But actually, neither spelling is correct. The name derives from the Cantonese gām-gwāt 金橘, literally meaning golden orange or golden tangerine. Our transliteration of the Cantonese, with the g sound so close to the k sound, had become C(K)umquat. There are parts of the world that call them Chinese Orange – so much simpler.

Cumquat recipes include Cumquat Tea, Cumquat Rice, and Cumquat Chutney.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes, and our Cumquat recipes. Explore our Indian dishes, and our Indian Essentials too. Or check out our delicious Late Winter dishes.

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