Beetroot, Avocado and Pea Salad

There is so much good stuff in this “almost superfood” salad that it makes you feel very healthy and conscientious indeed. Served as it is, it can be a very substantial meal – just scatter a few roasted hazelnuts and/or chunks of creamy goat’s cheese over the top, and you need nothing else.

Did you know that I grew up calling beetroot, red beet? That name seems to have disappeared in Australia, although a quick search on google confirms that at least some people, in some parts of the world, retain that name. I wonder if it came from my mother, whose family contained many German immigrants. Perhaps it is a European thing.

The star of this dish is indeed the blanched then quick-pickled beetroot, and its contrast with the slightly bitter pea shoots. Rather than the hour-long boil or bake, eating beetroot raw or quickly sauteed or blanched is a healthy  and very delicious alternative. The beetroot retains a bite or crunch that adds textural layers to a dish. Everything can be prepared in advance for this salad, kept in the fridge, and combined at the last moment.

This is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area.

Similar recipes include Slightly Pickled Beetroot Salad with Mustard, Beetroot and Goat Cheese Salad with Rocket, and Beetroot Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing.

Browse all of our Beetroot Salads, and all of our other Beetroot dishes. Our Avocado dishes are here. Browse all of Ottolenghi’s dishes from Plenty More. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Broccolini and Edamame Salad with Curry Leaves and Coconut

This is a great green salad of beans, edamame and broccolini or sprouting broccoli. It is flavoured sort of South Indian style, with black mustard seeds and a handful of curry leaves. The coconut adds a beautiful contrast to the beans, although it can be left out of the recipe if desired.

It is an Ottolenghi recipe from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area. This recipe involves South Indian ingredients – mustard seeds, dried chillies and curry leaves. I have slightly altered the way that these are used in the recipe to get the best out of them..

Similar dishes include Broccoli with Orange-Verjuice-Butter Sauce, Tawa Edamame, Lemon and Curry Leaf Rice, and Crispy Curry Leaves.

Browse all of our Edamame dishes and all of our Curry Leaf recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Noodles with Spring Onions and Edamame

Do you have those times when Spring Onions (scallions, green onions) pile up in the fridge, forgotten? They are generally used in salads or as a garnish for soups and other dishes but rarely shine as a main ingredient. It is time to change that, and Ottolenghi is just the person to provide some inspiration.

This is one of Ottolenghi’s dishes that is a breeze to make, relatively speaking. In our Plenty More project, we’ve been making some of his more complex, time consuming and multi-pot making recipes, so it is a delight to make a dish that is simpler in preparation.

Yes, it is a dish from Plenty More, and is a simple stir fry of Spring Onions and Edamame, mixed with noodles, topped with coriander leaves and sesame seeds and dressed with Sesame oil, rice vinegar and lime juice. Don’t forget the lime – it is critical to this dish.

This is excellent with Steamed Aubergine.

Similar dishes include Soba Noodles with Quick Pickled Mushrooms, Soba Noodles with Quick Pickled Mushrooms, Ginger Scallion Noodles, Pan Fried Edamame with Chilli, Lime and Salt, Spring Onion Soup, and Glass Noodles and Green Mango Salad.

Browse all of our Noodle recipes and all of our Edamame dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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A Spring Salad

Today is a delicious Spring salad of asparagus, French beans, Broad beans, Edamame, and spinach. It creates a wonderful array of green, and this can be changed to your liking. Try chard, rocket, watercress, for example! It is a recipe from Ottolenghi’s Plenty More.

We love dishes that feature the various shades of a single colour, it makes you stop to check what’s in there. Spring and Early Summer are the time to do this as there is artichoke, rocket, asparagus, broad beans, watercress, samphire, peas, cabbage, all kinds of lettuce, runner beans, broccoli, sprouting broccoli, spring onion, chard, spinach and many, many more to choose from. When you put a few of these in one bowl, you get the most glorious celebration of colour and Spring. Thanks Ottolenghi.

It you make a lot of Ottolenghi salads, you will know that some toasted nuts sprinkled over the top of a salad makes a world of difference to the salad, adding both visual impact and a textural element. Making a large batch of toasted seeds will save you time – keep them in an air tight container. In this dish he specified sesame seeds and kalonji. We actually used a mixture of nuts and seeds that were left over from a previous salad – slivered almonds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and kalonji.

Similar recipes include Salad of Broad Beans with Walnut-Yoghurt Sauce, Broad Bean and Tomato Salad, Glorious Five Bean Salad, Shaved Asparagus Salad, and Tawa Edamame.

Browse all of our Bean Salads, Broad Bean Salads and Asparagus Salads.

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Mung Sprout and Edamame Salad

Sometimes I prepare to post a recipe and realise that it is for an ingredient that does not feature often in our collection of recipes over 12 years of posting on this blog (including some recipes from our blog that ran from 1995 to 2006). It is a surprise to find an ingredient not covered much in all of that time.

We do use Indian-style sprouts in some recipes – that is, the type of sprouts that are only just sprouted, with small little tails. But Mung Sprouts with long tails, Chinese style, feature hardly at all! So today we begin to remedy that.

The recipe is from Ottolenghi’s Plenty More and takes long Mung Sprouts and pairs them with, of all things, Umeboshi puree, edamame beans and radishes!! It really works, and is a terrific combination. This recipe is part of our project to cook more dishes from our Ottolenghi collection of books, and we are beginning with Plenty More.

The salty-sour Umeboshi puree, made from pickled plums, can be found in the Japanese section of larger supermarkets, in Japanese groceries and in health shops. If you can’t find Umeboshi puree, substitute pomegranate molasses.

Make more of the dressing, if you want: it’s so tangy and good that you’ll be tempted to douse this salad; failing that, it’ll keep in the fridge for other dishes in the days ahead.

Similar recipes include Mushroom and Carrot Salad with Sprouts, Bean Sprout Stir Fry, and How to Grow Sprouts.

Browse all of our Sprouts recipes and all of our recipes from Plenty More. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here.

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Tawa Peas | Pan Fried Peas, Broad Beans or Edamame | Street Food

Quickly pan fried with salt and chilli, these are delicious snacks.

A great snack, quickly prepared, is pan fried edamame. You can use peas as well. I like to do this with shelled peas and beans, but you can also make this with peas and edamame in their pods. Simply suck them out of the shell between your teeth after cooking. This can even be made with broad beans.

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