Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)

Here is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one is another using lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. It is often prepared as a dish for people who are or have been ill – no tamarind, mustard seeds or chillies. Instead, curry leaves are sautΓ©ed in ghee and added to the rasam with coriander leaves.

There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the fourth of her methods. The delight of providing multiple ways of making one dish is (if you love to explore the subtleties of flavour, as I do), you can make them side by side and examine their tastes.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

See all of the Lime Rasam dishes here.

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)”

Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder

Today there is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one has a slight toor dal base, uses sambar powder, and uses lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the second of her methods.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

Similar recipes include Rasam with Curry Leaves, Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Early Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder”

Lemon Dal

Lemons and limes, even oranges, are used in savoury dishes throughout India, for example in South India in Rasam and in Kuzhambu. Wonderful dishes. This recipe takes a simple Mung dal, blends it until it is silky smooth and infuses it with the flavours of lemon or lime peel and flesh. It is a delightful dish, and very refreshing in Summer.

This recipe is similar to Kancha Dal, but adds the lemons. It is a Bengali dish which I came across in the excellent book Bengali Cooking.

Similar dishes include Mung Dal with Ghee and Spices, Kancha Dal, and Mung Dal with Coconut Milk.

Browse all of our Dal recipes, and all of our Mung Dal dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Lemon Dal”

Narathankai Kuzhambu | Orange, Lemon or Lime Peel Kuzhambu

Top to Tail Vegetarian eating (perhaps it is Tip to Leaf) is all the vogue at my place.

Kuzhambu is a South Indian dish with infinite varieties. They are gravy-like dishes intended to eat over rice, and form an important part of daily meals in Tamil Nadu. Read more about Kuzhambu dishes here.

Orange Kuzhambu – made from the peel only – can also be made with lime or lemon peel (even Meyer lemons). Even mandarin peel can be used.

You can see the genesis of this dish in making food stretch, in the “top to tail” eating, vegetarian style, of people for whom sustenance and deliciousness was the requirement, whatever food was at hand. Perhaps it is “root to leaf” eating.

You can find recipes for the other Kuzhambus here. If you are looking for Sambar Recipes, they are here. (The list includes Kuzhambu Recipes.) Or explore our Indian dishes here and here. Other Winter recipes can be found here and here.

Continue reading “Narathankai Kuzhambu | Orange, Lemon or Lime Peel Kuzhambu”