Chickpea Flour Pancakes (Egg Free) with Eggplant Puree and Wild Rice Salad

 

It’s late Autumn, and although we have some beautiful days – a long lingering warm Autumn – the evenings can be cool. Winter is not yet poking its head around the corner but we are all aware that it is coming. Winter doonas are on the bed. The warm coats, PJs and dressing gowns are released from their Summer storage. Throw rugs are ready for snuggling up on the couch as we sip warm drinks or cups of soup in the evenings.

Chickpea Flour Pancakes are just perfect for evening meals – topped with any imaginable toppings, from curries to sautés to Wintery salads. Just a note of warning, these are not like wheat-flour based pancakes or crepes, quite different in flavour and texture in fact. But so delicious and full of protein.

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Pita Bread

Although the precise and detailed science of bread making has never been adopted in this household, there was a time that I baked bread every day. We had everything from brioche to focaccia. Honestly, any yeasted dough that I could mix in the morning so that it could prove during the day, and be cooked in the evening as the rest of the meal was prepared was fare game in our Kitchen in the mid to late ’90s. We would have never won prizes for our bread making but we loved it, and it was much cheaper than buying bread in those days (these days it is better than the horrid cheap breads that are available – I can hardly recognise them as bread).

I loved cooking Pita Bread and watching it puff up in the oven as it met the heat. It was a magic that I never tired of. The recipe we used was from the much loved cookbook of those times, Moosewood Cookbook.

It is easy to make bread if you have a machine with a dough hook, or if you are used to making bread by hand.

Other alternatives are -Use a food processor. Mine comes with a dough blade, but many people say that using a metal blade is just as effective (if not more so). Mix your dry ingredients with the food processor first, then add the wet ingredients and pulse about 12 pulses to combine the wet with the dry. Then process for 15 seconds 3-4 times. In between, stop the processor, lift out the dough and turn over. After 3 or 4 times, the dough will have come together nicely. It will also be warm from the heat of the processor. Hand knead the dough for 3 – 5 mins until smooth and elastic.

You can also use your Vitamix blender to make the dough. It comes with a “Dry” container with a special blade, with which the dough is pulsed and scraped. It mixes the dough nicely and reduces kneading time. Use a similar process to the one mentioned above for the food processor. If the blender seems to be labouring, turn it off immediately, turn the dough and try again.

Similar recipes include Spelt and Cider Loaf, Pol Roti, Quick Roti, and No Knead Focaccia.

Feel free to browse our Retro Recipes series. You might also liked our other Bread recipes. Or explore our Late Autumn dishes.

This recipe is part of the Retro Recipes series of recipes that contains some of our vegetarian recipes from our first blog in the 1990’s.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Sada Roti

Sada Roti is a Trinidad style roti, perfect with Baigan Choka. It is a staple in Trinidad, easy to make and can accompany any meal. The Indian influenced cuisine made its way to Trinidad with indentured servants who worked in the cane fields in the 1800’s.

The recipe is simple, just 4 everyday ingredients. The trick is to make sure that the dough is silky and smooth and that the tawa or griddle is evenly heated. The roti will puff up quite easily, but if it doesn’t, don’t worry, it will still taste delicious.

Similar recipes include Pita Bread, Roti Style Yoghurt Flatbreads, Pol Roti, and Roti from Goa.

Browse all of our Roti recipes and our Trinidad dishes. Or browse our Late Summer recipes.

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Black Barley with Mushrooms and Roti-Style Yoghurt Flatbreads

Black barley is a terrific find, it is nutty and dark in flavour and cooks easily in 35 – 45 minutes. I came across it at Goodies and Grains in Adelaide Central Market while I was stocking up with a few items. It is an African barley just becoming available more locally. It is excellent in soups, salads, vegetarian “stews” (let’s call it a ragout) like our recipe today, and even with tostadas and such like. As a base for other ingredients, it is excellent – try Black Barley with this Charred Okra dish.

Today we are using it to replace pearl barley (you can do that in any recipe). Ottolenghi has a recipe for Barley and Mushrooms in his book Plenty. We first made this around 2011, when my daughter and her family came back from London. There was much celebration. Barley and mushroom is a soothing combination – it is well known in Italy where a type of risotto, orzotto, is made from barley and mushrooms. The delight of the dish is mainly a textural thing, with the barley both gently breaking and enhancing the mushroomy gloopiness. This recipe uses 3 types of mushrooms, and today we used porcini, shiitake and pearl mushrooms, as I had pearl mushrooms left over from making a Soba Noodle and Mushroom dish.

Ottolenghi’s recipe also has some roti-like flatbreads made from wholewheat flour and mixed with yoghurt. These are rolled out and cooked on a tawa, flat griddle or frying pan. They are super easy to make and go with any dish similar to this one. You can also use any Mexican or Middle Eastern flatbread to compliment the barley if you are out of time to make your own. Or some frozen roti from your Indian Grocery.

It is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

It is a very wintery dish – perfect for brisk Autumn days through to Winter.

Similar recipes include Mushrooms with Black Glutinous Rice, Charred Okra with Barley, Barley and Porcini Risotto, and Barley Pilaf with Mushrooms.

Browse our Black Barley recipes, all of our Barley dishes and our Mushroom recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through his Plenty More book. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes. Continue reading “Black Barley with Mushrooms and Roti-Style Yoghurt Flatbreads”

Na’ama’s Fattoush

Fattoush, as its simplest, is another tomato and bread salad – a common combination around the globe. And as tomato and bread is a very very good basis for a salad; it is no wonder that it is popular. It is also a variety of chopped salad, easy to make, no fuss at all.

Mention Fattoush to anyone from the Middle East to Israel, and  you are likely to find yourself in a discussion (argument?) about the composition of the salad.  Is sumac essential? Should other spices be included? Is garlic necessary? Is the bread to be toasted? Or fried? What is the dressing made of? What herbs are included? How big should the pita pieces be?

It is one of THOSE salads, loved and protected by all who eat it regularly. As mentioned, it is a type of chopped salad with tomatoes and includes pita. A salad that is best when all ingredients are the freshest and best quality available.

Arab salad, chopped salad, Israeli salad – whatever you choose to call it. Wherever you go in the city, at any time of the day, a Jerusalemite is most likely to have a plate of freshly chopped vegetables – tomato, cucumber and onion, dressed with olive oil and lemon juice – served next to whatever else they are having. Friends visiting us in London always complain of feeling they ate ‘unhealthily’ because there wasn’t a fresh salad served with every meal.

Ottolenghi and Tamimi, in their book Jerusalem, have a recipe that comes from Sami’s mother. It is also in Sami’s book Falastin. Sami can’t recall anyone else in the neighbourhood making the recipe this way She called it fattoush, as it includes chopped vegetables and bread. She soaks the untoasted or fried bread in a kind of home-made buttermilk, which makes it terribly comforting. It is a gorgeous salad and the home made buttermilk dressing is wonderful. It does make it quite different to other versions of Fattoush.

Try to get small cucumbers for this as for any other fresh salad. If you need to use the larger, long cucumbers, perhaps remove the seeds before using, if you wish.

Summer purslane, a tangy succulent with fleshy leaves and something of the lamb’s lettuce about it, is commonly found in fattoush in its homelands, and is well worth adding for its lovely lemony flavour. I have included it as we have it growing.

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Pol Roti | Coconut Roti | Sri Lankan Flatbread

These Pol Roti are very popular in Sri Lanka, are eaten at all meals by many, and are particularly loved for breakfast. Pol Roti pairs well with curries, and Sri Lankan sambols, pickles and chutneys. They are even delicious with butter and jam!

A tawa is perfect for cooking them, but you can use any flat pan, griddle, hot plate or BBQ.

Pol Roti can be made thin or thicker. We have made them thick here, but you can choose to roll them out to a thinner roti. Chop the onions or chilli into smaller pieces for thinner roti.

Similar recipes include Sada Roti, Quick RotiRoti from Goa, and Adai.

Our Roti recipes are here or explore other Indian/Sir Lankan breads. Have a look at other Sri Lankan recipes, or browse our Indian dishes. Or simply check out our easy Early Summer recipes.

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Schiacciata with Cheese Topping

If Focaccia is half way between pizza and bread, then Schiacciata is half way between Focaccia and Pizza. It is flat and usually infused beautifully with olive oil.

Originally cooked in the ashes of the hearth, schiacciata, meaning squashed, is flat and 2 – 3 cm thick (but can be thinner). Variations of the bread are made throughout Italy. In Tuscany, it is simply brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with salt. Herbs such as rosemary can be added. A sweet version with grapes and sugar is also made.

This recipe with onion and cheese is great weekday lunch-at-home fare, even for Sunday night supper. It is great with a hearty soup. Maybe Onion Soup would be fabulous. In late Summer, pair it with ripe, bursting figs and celebrate the end of summer.

Similar recipes include Pita Bread, The Life Changing Loaf of Bread, Potato and Garlic Pizza, and Sweet Potato Bread with Raisins and Walnuts.

You might also liked our Focaccia recipes. Our pizza recipes are here. If you need pizza dough, the recipes are here. Feel free to browse other recipes from our Retro Recipes series. Or explore our Late Spring dishes.

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Chinese Scallion and Orange Zest Pancakes | Coriander and Chilli Pancakes | Fenugreek and Ajwain Pancakes

A classical Chinese dish with a twist

Scallion Pancakes are classic Chinese fare – crisp, flaky and chewy, made with layers of dough and sesame oil – they are surprisingly easy to make. You can also pre-make the dough and pop it in the fridge to make later. The pancakes can even be rolled out prior to cooking and kept with layers of baking paper between until you are ready to cook.

The traditional filling is Spring Onions (aka Scallions in the US), but indeed any filling can be used. Today, I have made 3 different ones:

  • Fenugreek Leaves with Ajwain and Cumin Seed
  • Coriander Leaves and Green Chilli
  • Spring Onions with Grated Orange Zest and White Pepper

Are you looking for similar recipes? We have some Indian chickpea flour “pancakes” here, and try some Indian dosa. And try Sweetcorn, Spring Onion and Chilli Pancakes, Sizzling Rice Squares, and Spring Onion Greens Salad.

Check out our Chinese and other Asian recipes. Or explore our easy Winter dishes.

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MID SPRING Goodies, Grains and Lentils, with BBQs, Snacks, Breads and Pasta for Spring Sustenance | Seasonal Cooking

Inspiration for Mid Spring Healthy Living

Capricious, transitional Spring gets into her stride, and by mid Spring is giving us gorgeous weather with hints of the Summer to come. It is daylight saving time, lighter now at night, as the sun withdraws her rays into herself later and later each evening. Warmer evenings and outside activities become more important.

Celebrating Spring

Some gorgeous inspirational sustaining food for you this Mid Spring. You can also browse

Other gorgeous Springtime posts include:

If you have difficulty with any links, please let us know. We would love to fix them for you.

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Cheela | Pudla | My Style

A thinner Pudla, almost a Cheela, perfect for breakfasts and snacks.

Today, when the world did not seem right, I made pudla, filled with spring onions (aka green onions in the US) and served them with a delish chutney gifted by a friend.

Pudla is a great quick and healthy snack that is endlessly versatile. There are various names for this chickpea flour pancake – Pudla, Cheela, Chilro, Besan Ja Chilra or Besan Chila.

There are more Pudla recipes here. Other similar recipes include Crespeou (Eggfree), Potato Dosa, Sweet Surnoli Dosa, and Adai.

Also browse our Chickpea Flour recipes, our Dosa recipes and our Snacks too. Our Indian recipes are here, and browse our Indian Essentials series. Or take some time to explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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