Glossy Strawberry Sauce

When strawberries are plentiful make a brightly coloured sauce to drizzle over desserts, icecream, cakes and anything with chocolate in it. It is very easy to make — simply whiz the strawberries with lemon and sugar. Add some liqueur if you wish. It is a bright and Summery sauce that adds vibrancy to any dish.

Similar recipes include Strawberries with Lemon, Mint Raspberry Sauce, and Strawberries with Sticky Balsamic.

Browse all of our Strawberry recipes all of our Desserts. Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.

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Poached Oranges with Vanilla Ricotta

There was a recipe I had been wanting to try for a while during Winter when the oranges hung large and gorgeous on the tree. But it was one of those times when the recipe sat on my kitchen bench for weeks before finally making it. Originally I had considered making it as a stand-alone dessert, but finally made it as a topping for a very special sweet congee. Since then, we have also topped our favourite rice pudding with these poached oranges and ricotta, and served it as-is, as a delicious dessert at the end of a long cold day. It really is divine, incredibly quick and easy to make, and can be served warm or cold.

The recipe comes from An Honest Kitchen an e-magazine that was produced by my friends Kathryn and Lucy. I have modified the recipe only a little from the original.

Similar recipes include Orange and Pecan Cream Cheese, Orange and Date Salad, and Baked Apricots with Honey and Orange.

Browse all of our Orange recipes, and our Ricotta dishes. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Indian French Toast (Eggless) with Baked Strawberries

Summer time and strawberries. The scent of fresh strawberries is intoxicating – have you noticed?  We tend to eat them fresh, make Strawberry Icecream, we might bake them, they might go into a salad, or we blitz them into a lassi or frappe or smoothie. Occasionally we make strawberry jam.

But today we are having a special breakfast, making an Indian version of French Toast (no eggs involved), that is topped with slightly baked strawberries. The toast is encased in a sweet, cinnamon flavoured, chickpea flour batter, and is topped with baked strawberries. You can make the same French Toast and serve with strawberry jam – that is pretty good too.

Similar recipes include Poached Oranges with Vanilla Ricotta, Baked Strawberries, Strawberries with Lemon, and Strawberries with Sticky Balsamic.

Browse all of our Strawberry recipes, and all of our Toasties. Or explore our easy Early Summer dishes.

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Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup

Take these little balls of tangy sweetness and serve with pudding, baked sweet rice or over a sweet syrupy cake. They go well with icecream, or just with some creme fraiche or thick yoghurt. Chop them up and through them into salads or mix through rice. These are so good! They are exceptional accompaniments to hot Indian curries.

Similar recipes include Indian French Toast with Baked Strawberries, Cumquat Chutney, Cumquat Marmalade, and Cumquats in Gin.

Browse all of our Cumquat dishes, and all of our Desserts. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Locquats and Mango with Kaffir Leaf

In my new place there is a locquat tree, struggling a little as it is in the shade of a larger tree that is yet to be pruned. Last year there were no locquats, but this year there are some, enough for this small household. We do have to use a ladder to pick all but the lowest ones, but it is worth it. Tonight we mix them with mango for a wonderful Spring dessert.

We don’t have many desserts here, but some similar recipes include: An Autumn Fruit Salad with Apples, Pears and Pomegranate, Strawberries with a Mint Raspberry Sauce, and Peaches with Asian Flavours.

Check out our Locquat recipes and  Mango dishes. Our Desserts are here. Or explore our Mid Spring collection of recipes.

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Sweet Quinoa and Oat Congee

Congee, back in the Ming dynasty, was used as a vehicle for medicinal herbs. Even without the herbs, it is such a great vehicle for love, comfort and nourishment. It is comfort food indeed, eaten at any time but especially when one is feeling under the weather, or has stomach trouble. It is also reputed to be suitable for eating when one has a hangover.

Most people think of congee as a rice porridge, but depending on where you lived in Asia, your congee might be made with millet, barley, corn, mung beans or other legumes, mixed with or without rice. Sadly, it is only the South China version made with rice that has become known more universally, probably because it is so creamy and mild. Congee has lots of names across the world too, eg jook (Cantonese, Korean), jok (Thailand), zhou (Mandarin), kanji (Tamil), chao (Vietnamese), canja (Portugese). In Thailand, they mix additional ingredients into the congee, but in China, it is served with toppings and sides.

Congee is a great way to prepare a meal out of nothing. A cup of rice, lentils or grain can be cooked with 8 – 10 cups of water and whatever flavourings are available in the pantry at the time. I prefer to cook congee in a clay pot, easily available from any Chinese store, as it gives a better flavour.

And most of all, congee is a meal that’s all about personal preference. Cook your chosen grain or lentil, for as long as it takes to get your perfect texture, flavour it as you will, and add the toppings that you enjoy. Today’s congee is made with Oats and Quinoa, a delicious combination that is perfect for breakfast or day time snack. Unlike our other congee recipes, it is one that is sweetened with the addition of dried fruit while cooking.

Similar recipes include CongeeRice, Millet and Lentil Congee, Black Glutinous Rice Congee, and Red Rice and Adzuki Bean Congee.

Browse all of our Congee recipes, and all of our Quinoa and Oat dishes. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Warm Rice Pudding with Orange Star Anise Sauce and Walnuts

Rice pudding never goes astray in cooler weather, and indeed I judge the start of the cold months by my impulsion to make one. Late in the Winter too, when the oranges are ripe and juicy, it is delicious with an orange sauce drizzled over the top. Today we make a buttery Orange Sauce with Walnuts. It is a pudding that is at its best when eaten warm to hot.

Similar dishes include Poached Oranges and Vanilla Ricotta, Baked Rice Pudding, Cold Pandan Rice Pudding with Lime Syrup, and Bengali Rice Kheer.

Browse all of our Rice Puddings and all of our Desserts, or explore all of our Late Winter recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Orange Star Anise Sauce with Walnuts

Are you looking for a sauce to use with pancakes, surnoli, rice puddings, fruit puddings, chunks of left-over xmas cake and/or crepes? This is a delicious buttery Orange Sauce with Walnuts.

We have used it most recently with Rice pudding, turning a plain dessert into a stunningly beautiful dish.

Similar recipes include Poached Oranges and Vanilla Ricotta, and Orange Verjuice Butter Sauce.

Browse all of our Orange recipes and all of our Desserts. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Sweet Rhubarb with Cloves and Black Pepper, Poppy Seeds and Gin Soaked Cumquats

I have had a life long aversion to rhubarb, ever since childhood. We grew a lot of rhubarb and it was served, stringy and under-sweetened at almost every meal while in season. It has taken until this year, decades later, for me to try it again. And only because I was given some rhubarb from a friend’s garden.

You will love this recipe. It is an alternative to your rhubarb with apples, or rhubarb pie. The jaggery adds that sweet earthiness, cloves add their magic, black pepper brings a bite without tasting peppery, and the poppy seeds add much needed texture.

I have used some of my Gin Soaked Cumquats to enliven the dish – it does need a little acid and these bring a sweet acidity to the dish. You can alternatively add some charred, sugar dipped lemon slices, candied orange or lemon peel, a little (just a little) pomegranate molasses or quince molasses, or even, if desperate, a squeeze of lemon.

Similar recipes include Beetroot and Rhubarb Salad, Apples with Lemon and Cinnamon, and Pears with Marsala. Also try our Sweet Orange Star Anise Sauce.

Browse our Rhubarb recipes, and all of our Desserts. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Aussie Scones

Scones, those English and Australian afternoon-tea essentials, slathered with strawberry jam and whipped cream, are often the star of our afternoon snacks. From a young age, I would make scones for visitors. As soon as I could, I would slip away and leave them to chat with others in the house. I would head for the kitchen and whip up a batch of scones, bringing them out still hot from the oven to the delight of everyone who happened to be there at that time.

In fact, it takes only 15 minutes to produce a basket full of lovely hot scones that are feather light.

Sometimes you can eat them just with butter, or without sugar but with cheese mixed into the batter and sprinkled over the top before baking. Jam and cream is very traditional. Sultanas can be added to the dough. Pumpkin scones have a reputation in Australia but they are not something that I make more than once a decade. Or omit the sugar and add a little black pepper, and serve them with a large bowl of soup.

These favourites are not, take note, *not* the American scone, pronounced scoh-n, more like our biscuits than this light and fluffy delicacy. Ours is pronounced sco-n, a short “o”, as in pond.

Similar recipes include Australian Quick and Easy Date Slice, Oatcakes and Griddle Cakes.

Browse all of our Biscuits (there are not many, we don’t have a sweet tooth), and our Desserts. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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