Turmeric Oil

Turmeric Oil is a great pantry staple, to drizzle over soups, new potato salads, baked vegetables, dals, fried snacks, in dressings, and so much more. Want a change? Make it with mustard oil.

Don’t forget that turmeric stains, so be careful when using the oil.

Similar recipes include Herb Oil, Parsley Oil and Chilli Oil.

Browse all of our Oils and all of our Turmeric recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Broccoli with Orange-Verjuice-Butter Sauce

Sometimes retro is good, right? We make fun of the food from the 70’s and 80’s in its seemingly insane attempts to be more sophisticated. But amongst all the dishes that seem are so funny when we look back at them are some gems – let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Out of that era comes an orange sauce that pairs nicely with broccoli. I make it quickly – no French finesse here when we need to get food on the table. Good Australian Verjuice makes a delicious addition, but use white wine if you wish. Go the whole way and top the dish with toasted flaked almonds if desired – they are lovely with this dish.

I have been known to make a plate of this and eat it for lunch. It is that good. If you can get home-grown oranges, all the better. We have 2 trees and they taste so good compared to shop bought ones.

Similar dishes include Broccolini and Snow Peas with Sweet Tahini Dressing, Spicy Chickpeas with Broccoli, Sri Lankan Broccoli Curry (use broccoli in place of the okra), and Lemak Style Vegetables.

Browse our Broccoli dishes, or be inspired by our Late Winter recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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Fruit and Herb Flavoured Vinegars

Spring is a great time for making some flavoured vinegars for Summer Salads and vegetables. It also makes great presents for Xmas! The flavoured vinegars are easy to make and can be left to infuse the flavours for as little as 2 weeks.

We show you a general method, and then several specific flavoured vinegars. If you are growing your own fruits and herbs, this is an excellent way to use your crops. Don’t forget to sterilise all of your equipment and utensils.

Similar recipes include Glossy Strawberry Sauce, How to Make Quince Paste, How to Pickle Ginger, and How to Make Chilli Paste.

Browse all of our How To suggestions, and all of our Early Spring recipes.

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Ginger Scallion Noodles

Oh those nights in the various China Towns of the world, eating noodles and congee and salt and pepper tofu, and wonderful silky eggplants. Simple dishes are tasty and elegant, in a way that sometimes we forget. Paring back to basics gives such good dishes.

For this dish you will need a basic Ginger Scallion Sauce (we call them Spring Onions, but it doesn’t sound as good). The sauce is useful in the kitchen and is one of my pastes, purees, powders, stocks and sauces that commonly grace my quiet kitchen bench. It is useful in so many ways – into soups and broths it goes, over rice with some deep fried tofu and shredded vegetables, drizzled onto bok choy with or without noodles, smeared on sandwiches.

Once you have the sauce, all you need for this recipe is some noodles and some veg. That’s it. And variations are endless. Make it as simple or as fussy as you like.

Similar recipes include Sesame-Chilli-Soy Dipping Sauce, Soba Noodles with Quick Pickled Mushrooms, Glass Noodles and Green Mango Salad.

Browse all of our Noodle dishes, our Dipping Sauces and all of our Asian recipes. Or explore our Early Summer dishes.

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Grilled Pineapple with Chilli, Basil and Green Tomato Dressing

Pineapples are very cheap here at different times of the year, often selling for under $1. At these times we like to grab a couple and make juices and cook our favourite dishes. This is one of them – pineapple grilled on the BBQ – so Summery! – and them mixed with chilli, herbs, lime, and another Summer favourite, a dressing made from Green Tomatoes. Wowee!

You can make this salad with halved, stoned peaches too (Divine!), some partially roasted red grapes (oh my!), roasted figs (drool!) and even sweet plums! Think about using honey dew melon or rockmelon (perhaps without grilling). Or change the dressing for a herbaceous, chilli-garlic-spice dressing.

Similar recipes include Cucumber and Pineapple Kachumber, Chilli Pineapple Salad,  and Green Tomato and Pineapple Salsa.

Browse all of our Pineapple recipes and all of our Salads. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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MID AUTUMN Salads and Dips for Exciting Autumn Eating VOL 2 | Seasonal Cooking

What a special month this is, quintessential Autumn. No matter where you are it is a month of change. Beautiful cold weather vegetables come to the table – Spinach, Pumpkin, Potatoes, Eggplants. The vegetables at this time of the year are superb.

Enjoy some Vegetable inspiration for Mid Autumn deliciousness. You can also browse:

If you have difficulty with any links, please let us know. We would love to fix them for you.

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Miso and Ginger Dressing

In our series of miso recipes and especially miso dressings, we have a creamy, salty, tangy dressing today. It is wonderful spooned over any tofu, salad, grated raw vegetables, steamed or grilled vegetables, and in wraps and sandwiches. It livens up dull soups as well. The recipe is a version of one in The Book of Miso.

Similar recipes include Miso and Tahini Dressing, and Miso and Sesame Dressing.

Browse all of our Dressings and all of our Miso recipes. Or explore our Mid Winter recipes.

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Baked Fennel with Mint and Parsley, with a Creamy Sauce

It is late winter and the fennel in my green grocer is still both superb and cheap. Today we bake it with lemon and herbs. It is served with a lovely creamy sauce, almost like aoli, but made with cream. As we are vegetarians, we don’t cook with eggs, so this dressing of pouring cream, seasoning and lemon juice, beaten till it thickens, is a perfect substitute. You should try it! Different flavourings can be added as needed.

Today, we caramelised some cumquats to serve with the fennel. The caramelisation deepens the cumquat flavours and as they are abundantly in season we are using them in place of lemons in many dishes.

Are you after similar recipes? Try Baked Fennel Stuffed with Feta, Florentine Fennel with Parmesan, Slow Baked Fennel with Chilli, Orange and Garlic, Grilled Fennel with Fresh Mozzarella, and Fennel a la Grecque.

Browse all of our Fennel recipes and all of our Dressings. Our Baked dishes are good in Winter to warm the kitchen. Or take some time to explore our Late Winter recipes.

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EARLY AUTUMN Salads, Dressings, Dips and Sauces for Good Autumn Eating Volume 2 | Seasonal Cooking

As the heat retreats, so many vegetables are at their best in Early Autumn. Salads are still very much at the fore of our kitchen fare. As the heat tempers and the gardens once gain flourish, a slow Autumn rhythm begins to emerge. This is Volume 2 of our Early Autumn Salads – Salads are excellent in Autumn – browse Volume 1 as well.

Enjoy our Salad Inspiration for Early Autumn.

You can also browse other Early Autumn recipes:

If you notice any links that have problems, please let us know – we’d love to fix them for you.

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Roasted Whole Cauliflower with Green Tahini Dressing

Cauliflowers, roasted whole, have become a fashionable item for sometime – perhaps you might say it is going out of fashion, along with cauliflower steaks. But riced cauliflower still makes a regular appearance and I am glad about that – late onto the bandwagon as usual, I tried it for the first time recently and it is quite amazing.

So it is a surprise that Ottolenghi has a roasted whole cauliflower recipe in his new book Simple. And simple it is – par boiled then roasted with butter and oil before serving with a green tahini sauce. Elements of Ottolenghi, without all the hoohaa of his other books.

In a way, though, it is shockingly simple. It almost doesn’t feel quite right, doesn’t feel quite  like Ottolenghi. Even the style of the book has changed – the texture is different (different papers used), the layout is different. I am in 2 minds about the style changes – I wanted it to have all the lux of over-the-top Ottolenghi cookbooks, but with simpler recipes.

The book defines simple in 6 different ways (the first letters of which spell out SIMPLE), and each recipe is labelled to indicate which of these various simplicities it belongs to. For me, the most important simplicity is S ie Short on Time. In my household, somewhere between 6 and 8 dishes are made daily, so spending a minimum of 1 hour on an Ottolenghi dish does not make efficiency sense, even though we might adore the dish. HOWEVER, in defence of Ottolenghi’s other books, they contain recipes that can be a whole meal. That is not the case in Simple. TBH, you’d have to make 2 or 3 dishes to make a whole meal from Simple, or pair one dish with other plates of food.

Another first impression is that, reading through Simple, many of the recipes feel like half-recipes. That is not a criticism! It is a comment on the way he layers textures and flavours in his other books, and thus the simplicity of this book shocks! For example, take Whole Roasted Cauli. I might have expected Roasted Cauli, pureed, with cooked and toasted chickpeas, a tahini dressing and herb oil topped with baby falafel with a sumac dust. No, wait! That actually sounds great! (makes note to self). But here in Simple, we have only the cauliflower with a tahini dressing. It does make the recipes very accessible for weeknight cooking. And, for all its simplicity, this dish is a cracker!

Again, the comments on simplicity are not a criticism, it is an emotional response. We all have these when confronted with change. During my project of cooking Plenty More I often lamented the complexity (especially of time) and hankered after some Elizabeth David recipes. I have my wish now, although perhaps the style of Simple is a little like Elizabeth David on a small dose of steroids. She can specify recipes in 2 or 3 lines. Ottolenghi still takes a page or 2 for each dish.

Truthfully, I can’t wait to dive into this book and get to know it as intimately as I know the others.

“I like to serve this in the centre of the table, for people to share with drinks at the start of a meal. We break the cauliflower apart with our hands, dip the individual florets and crisp green leaves into the sauce and sprinkle with salt.”

It is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking through Plenty More (nearly finished), but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Roasted Cauliflower with Cumin and Sumac, A Plate of Cauliflower, Cauliflower Roasted in Olive Oil, and Cauliflower Roasted with Mustard Seeds and Curry Leaves.

Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. As we cook more, you will find all of our dishes from Simple here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

We use Australian measurements: 1 tspn = 5ml; 1 Tblspn = 20ml; 1 cup = 250ml.

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