Malabar Spinach Pakoda

Malabar Spinach is a thick spinach like leaf that grows on a vine – it is often confused with other greens, but look for leaves that are thick, a little mucilaginous, and are on twining stalks.  It may also have white or purple flowers and seeds on the vine. These leaves are common in India and throughout S. E. Asia. It has various names in India and may be called Basella Spinach, Poi leaf, Bacchalikura or Vasalakkirai.

Malabar Spinach is not really a spinach at all, but the taste is similar and it is better suited to summer growing than real spinach.

Similar dishes include Crispy Fried Potato and Onion Strings, Red Onion and Chilli Pakora, Bhajji, and Okra and Cauliflower Packora.

Browse all of our Malabar Spinach recipes and Pakora dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Eggplant and Kale Pakora

Pakora are a favourite street food in India, and one that can easily be made at home. Recipes use a chickpea flour batter into which vegetables are dipped and then deep fried. I like to serve these Pakora with sea salt and lemon juice only, but they are commonly eaten with Indian sauces and chutneys.  One word describes them. Delicious. Incredibly delicious. Have a glass of chai with them – I also love them with a small cup of spicy rasam.

In frying the pakora (also called pakoda, bhajji and bhajiya) the aim is to cook the vegetable in the same amount of time that the batter takes to become crispy. It is about temperature, so it is a good idea to test-fry a few pieces before cooking the whole batch.

The types of vegetables that can be used include potatoes, onion rings, eggplant, sweet potatoes, softer pumpkins, lotus root, cauliflower and greens such as spinach, kale and amaranth leaves. Make sure that any greens are really dry before using.

Similar recipes include Malabar Spinach Pakora, Red Onion and Green Chilli Pakora, Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, and Vegetable Fritters.

Browse all of our Pakoras and all of our Snacks. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Kurkuri Bhindi | Crispy Spicy Fried Okra

This recipe is a variation of this other Kurkuri Bhindi recipe. Instead of carefully removing the seeds, this time the seeds are left in place, and the okra are halved or quartered rather than carefully splintered.

In this Rajasthani recipe, the okra slices are marinated in spices and, just before frying, are coated in chickpea flour and rice flour. The flours form a self-battered coating on the okra. After frying, they are a crispy snack that can be eaten with a meal or any time that you have the munchies.

Are you interested in Okra recipes? Read more about Okra here. And try Teeny Dried Okra Vathal, Crispy Okra in Yoghurt, Salad of Charred Okra with Tomato, Ladyfingers Recheio, Avial, and Spicy Dried Okra.

Or are you looking for Rajasthani recipes? Try Urad Tomatar Dal. We have more recipes planned, so check back here in the future.

Why not browse all of our Okra recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Have a look at our range of snacks. Or simply explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Red Onion and Green Chilli Bhajiya

Looking for quick and easy snacks? These Onion Bhajiya are feather light and so more-ish – you had better make quite a few. Heat from the chilli, the beautiful citrusy warmth of the coriander seed and the chickpea flour coating make these a great go-to accompaniment to a strong cuppa Indian tea either morning or afternoon on a cool day.

This is a treasure of Bengal, north of India. The original recipe comes from Christine Mannfield in her collection of Indian recipes Tasting India. I adapted it a little. The beauty of this recipe is that the onions are not coated in a batter, but the chickpea flour is worked into the onions, using its own moisture, to form a delicious crispy light coating.

Have a look at this other style of Onion BhajiEggplant and Kale Pakora, and these Vegetable Bhaji. Or try this Greek-Indian Tomato Pakoras. Other Onion dishes you could try include Confit d’Oignon (Onion Jam), Onion Salad with Sesame Oil, and South Indian Onion Strings Slightly Pickled Salad.

Browse all of our Bhajiya/Pakoras here, or have a look at our Indian Snacks. All of our Onion recipes are here, and Indian dishes are here. Or you might like to explore all of our easy Mid Autumn dishes.

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Okra and Cauliflower Pakora

Are you ready for a snack? Okra and Cauliflower Pakora (Pakoda) will satisfy your deepest longings. Tossed in some chickpea flour batter, with rice flour for crispness, these little beauties are beautiful dunked into some green chutney and eaten on a sunny afternoon, sitting under a tree.

Are you after snack recipes? Try Malabar Spinach Pakora, Eggplant and Kale Pakora, Chickpea Flour Socca, Farinata and Pudla, Paprika Oven Chips, Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, Cumin and Pepper Baked Potato Wedges, Chickpea Fingers with Tomato Salsa, and Paneer Toast.

Or perhaps you are after Okra dishes. Try Quick Okra Raita, Kurkuri Bindi (Crispy Okra), Ladyfingers Recheio (Okra with Chilli-Spice Paste), and Fried Ladyfingers, Goan Style.

Want more information? Read about Okra here, then browse all of our Okra recipes, and all of our Snack recipes. Pakora are here. All of our Indian dishes are here and Indian Essentials here. Or simply explore our easy Early Autumn dishes.

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Kurkuri Bhindi | Crispy Okra | Crispy Ladyfingers

Okra, or Ladyfingers, are best when cooked fresh. They can be stuffed with a tangy masala, deepfried to crisp (great with peanuts), made into raita, cooked in coconut milk or a spicy gravy, or batter-fried as pakoras.  They are even great when dried and served with spices as a snack.

Okra pairs well with sour tastes – for example, lemon juice or amchur (dry mango powder). Always buy young, bright green, crisp pods free of bruises, tender but not soft, and definitely not if they are wilting. There are a range of varieties – long and thin, short and fat, even red and orange varieties.

Kurkuri means crisp and Bhindi (or Bindi) is Okra. This recipe is very common in parts of North India, especially in Rajasthan from Jaipur to Udaipur and beyond. They are definitely a great snack served with drinks, and are also served as an accompaniment to rice and curries. The spices used with the okra are varied – here we have used chilli powder, cumin, chaat masala and amchur – but more complex, or simpler combinations can be used.

The okra can be cooked on its own, as we do here. But you can also tart them up somewhat by including slivers of onion (yum), ginger (tangy) and red peppers.

Are you interested in Okra recipes? Read more about Okra here. And try another version of Kurkuri Bhindi, Quick Okra Raita, Crispy Fried Okra Pachadi, Slightly Charred Okra with Chilli, Garlic and ThymeStir Fried Okra with Sesame Seed, Ladyfingers Recheio, Avial, and Whole Fried Okra.

Or are you looking for Rajasthani recipes? Try Urad Tomatar Dal. We have more recipes planned, so check here for more.

Why not browse all of our Okra recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Have a look at our range of snacks. Or simply explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Domatokeftedes | Santorini Style Tomato “Patties” | Indian Tomato Pakoras

Greek Tomatoes in Batter, a delicious snack

Domatokeftedes are delicious Greek tomatoes in batter, in fact they are similar to Pakoda/Pakora. They are often referred to as fritters or patties, although they don’t always conform to a uniform shape.

Domatokeftedes are a  specialty of Santorini in Greece. They are traditionally made with the island’s native tomato that is grown in the volcanic soil. It does not require watering, and yet the small tomato is sweet and intensely flavoured. This recipe uses any juicy tomato – Roma tomatoes are good. The fritters can be served as a snack or as part of a mezze platter – they are delicious dipped into tzatziki or any yoghurt sauce, sweet chilli sauce, or a herby blended fresh coriander and mint chutney.

This dish is very versatile. And it is such an innovative way to use tomatoes!

Similar recipes include Eggplant and Kale Pakora, Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, and Vegetable Bhajji.

You might also like to explore our Greek recipes, and our Tomato recipes. And have a look at our Pakora dishes and Snack recipes. Check out our easy Late Summer recipes.

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Bhajiya | Pakora | Vegetable Fritters Indian Style

Oh the joys of Bhajji

Oh the joys of Indian snacks, of that (often) deep fried combo of flavours, of the special chutneys and spices, the lip smacking, breath-taking joy that goes on and on and on.

Bhajiya is truly tremendous. I made today’s afternoon nosh with potato, eggplant (brinjal), red capsicum and onion. I thoroughly recommend this, eaten in the sunshine with a cool ale or iced tea, and friends.

It is accompanied with fresh mango cheeks with chaat masala. Bhajiya can be served as breakfast, snacks or as an appetiser. I like to accompany it with diced fruit, a green salad or kachumber.

There are some similar recipes. Try our Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, Crispy Battered Onion Bhaji, and Okra and Cauliflower Pakora. Or for snacks, try the Channa Chat with Chat Masala, and Baked Chickpeas.

Browse all of the Bhajiya here and all Indian Snacks here. Or explore our Indian recipes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Or be inspired by our easy Early Summer recipes.

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Pudla and Crispy Battered Onion Rings | Two Recipes using Chickpea Flour

Celebrating Chickpea Flour

I have to say, chickpea flour is the best! So versatile, if I was to be marooned on a desert island, it is one of the pantry ingredients that I would take with me. From the beautiful Farinata, to a stabliser in yoghurt curry, to crispy batters and fritter-like little dosas, it brings joy into the kitchen. Going by different names, you may recognise Chickpea Flour as Besan, or Gram Flour.

Make these two quick recipes in no time at all. They make a lovely sunny breakfast on the terrace – Pudla, Crispy Battered Onion Rings, Lentils, Tomatoes, Curd (yoghurt) and deep fried yoghurt dried chillies. Finish it off with a nice crispy, slightly sour apple.

Pudla is also called Cheela, Puda or Pooda, and there are versions from many parts of India. They are a fairly relaxed form of Dosa.

You might also like to try Chickpea Flour Socca, Farinata and Pudla, Pudla with Green Coriander, Chickpea Flour Pudla, or Chickpea Flour “Cakes” with Tomato Salsa. Or try Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, and Vegetable Bhajji.

All Pudla recipes are here. And browse our Indian Recipes. Be inspired by our Early Spring recipes.

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