Tomato Bharta | Roast Tomato Side Dish or Chutney

Bharta are North Indian (Punjabi) dishes where the main ingredient is roasted and then pureed with spices. The flavours are intensified by the roasting and the resulting dish is spicy and tangy. A commonly known bharta is Baingan Bharta (Eggplant Bharta).

This recipe uses tomatoes and it is amazing. It is great as a dip, served over rice, used as a sauce, or as an accompaniment to any curry. It can be served with dal-rice, kitchari or stuffed parathas. It also goes well with Chapatti, Roti. It has the best taste!

Looking for Bharta recipes? Try Baingan ka Bharta. 

Perhaps you are looking for other Punjabi dishes. Try Kohlrabi Subzi, Potato and Eggplant Curry, and Urad Dal with Tomatoes.

It is Tomato recipes that you are after. Try Potatoes Baked with Cumin and Tomatoes, Greek-Indian Tomato Pakoras, and Baked Tomato Pasta Sauce.

See all of our Bharta recipes here. Read all about Indian Chutneys here, and feel free to browse other Indian Chutneys recipes. See Tomato recipes here. Or simply explore all of our Punjabi dishes, our Indian dishes and our Early Autumn recipes.

This recipe can be frozen without the tadka – browse other Autumnal ways of preserving for Winter here.

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Green Chutney | Indian Mint and Coriander Chutney

This is one of the ubiquitous chutneys of India, made with Mint and/or Coriander, and served with so many snacks, used in sandwiches and slathered onto street food. India has a glorious tradition of mishing and mashing things together to make the most inspired chutneys, and other dishes such as Bhartas.

Use it as a spread or a dip. It goes well with Pakora, Samosa, Chole, Potato Chips, Vadapav, Bhel, Dhokla, Chaat and Snacks, and so much more. Make your own – store bought lacks the beautiful freshness of home made. Use it in inspired ways too – in Salad Dressings, drizzled over grilled cheese and toast, and stir into yoghurt for dips and dressings.

Are you looking for Indian Chutneys? Try Spinach Chutney, Coriander and Coconut Chutney, Apricot Chutney and Ginger Coconut Chutney.

What about some more Coriander or Mint recipes? Try Zhug (an amazing Coriander Puree), Coriander Paste, and Mint Paneer.

Want more? Browse all Indian Chutneys, and explore all our Coriander recipes and Mint recipes. All of our Indian Recipes are here. Or simply take some time with our Easy Early Autumn recipes.

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Inji Thengai Thayir Pachadi | Ginger Coconut Yoghurt Salad or Chutney

Have I mentioned how important yoghurt is in our kitchen? We use it a lot – from lassi drinks, to salad dressings, to yoghurt curries, chilled soups, to pachadi dishes like this one, to all sorts of Middle Eastern dishes. We drain it to make it thick, we pile it on our overnight oats for breakfast and we drizzle it over fruit salads.

This dish, Ginger and Coconut Pachadi, can be used as an Indian Chutney (ie as a little on the side to eat with the main dishes) or more like an Indian Yoghurt Salad.

Try these recipes too: Spinach Pachadi, Carrot Pachadi, and Cucumber Pachadi.

If you would like some more ginger in your life, try this tea, Pickled Ginger, and a Ginger and Garlic Soup.

Take some time to browse all of our Pachadi dishes, all Yoghurt dishes or all Ginger dishes. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Spinach Thogayal | South Indian Spinach Chutney

A South Indian cooked Chutney, a smooth puree with spices that intensifies the flavour of the main ingredient.

Indian Chutneys are spicy, sweet or sour condiments that add variety and flavour to a South Indian meal. They bring out the very essence of the ingredient being used, intensifying the flavour and enhancing it with the spices used. They are eaten at most days in a South Indian household. This is a cooked chutney – spinach is steamed until cooked and then pureed with fried mustard seeds, chilli, a little dal and curry leaves.

Cooked chutneys will last several days to a week, and can be frozen successfully. Although traditionally eaten with rice and Indian dishes, they can be used in a variety of ways including in spreads, dips, sauces and dressings. Or like me, you can eat it by the spoonful. This tastes so exceptionally spinachy.

You might like to browse our other Indian Chutneys here and here, or other Indian recipes here and here. Our Spinach recipes are here and here. You might also like our Autumn recipes here and here.
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Coriander and Coconut Fresh Chutney

A fresh South Indian Chutney made from pureed coconut and coriander.

This is a simple Indian chutney. There are three varieties of chutney: fresh chutneys, cooked chutneys, and dry chutneys. Fresh South Indian chutneys are smooth purees made from uncooked ingredients, perhaps seasoned with a tadka of mustard seeds, dal, and curry leaves. They are best freshly made, but they stay good for a couple of days if refrigerated. Made from raw ingredients this type of chutney is unlike most other dishes which have at least some degree of cooking.

Chutneys add zing to a meal and are an essential part of a South Indian meal time. They can be prepared with a limitless variety of ingredients.

Are you looking for chutneys? There are a range of Eastern and Western Chutneys here and here. Browse our Coriander dishes here and here. Or explore Indian recipes here.

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Khumani Chatni | Apricot Chutney | Indian Style

Fragrant and wonderful, this chutney is great when ripe fruit hangs from the trees. At other times, used dried apricots.

This is outstanding chutney, especially when the apricots are tree-ripened, sweet and fragrant. For those of us resorting to fruits sold at supermarkets or corner grocers, look for barely ripened fruit with a fragrant smell. If they are absolutely without smell, use dried apricots which require an overnight soaking in lime juice and water and a slight increase in cooking time.

This is from Lord Krishna’s Kitchen. It is sharp, tangy and sweet at the same time. Make it the star of the meal, even though it is a chutney. It’s strong flavours should not have to compete with other dishes.

You might also want to try Cumquat Chutney, or Baked Apricots with Honey and Orange. Have a look at our Chutney recipes here and here.

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