Black Pepper Garlic Broccoli with Mustard Seeds and Curry Leaves

If you follow our blog (hello to all of our lovely followers!) you will know how much we love broccoli. Particularly pan-roasted broccoli. This time we have turned it into an Indian style dish, with black pepper as its major flavouring.  It is delicious!

Similar recipes include Steamed Broccoli with Pinenuts, Broccoli with Orange Sauce, Bean Curd with Broccoli, and Sri Lankan Broccoli Curry.

Browse all of our Broccoli recipes. Or explore our Indian recipes and our Indian Essentials here. Alternatively, explore our Mid Spring collection of dishes.

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Punjabi Aloo Wadiyan

Wadiyan (also spelled Varian and Badiyan) are large balls of dried lentils, peculiar to the cuisine of the Punjab. They are sun dried spicy urad dal balls that serve to spice a dish and also to thicken the gravy. They are very spicy and each bite sends a burst of flavour to your tastebuds. They are also quite meaty in texture, and thus a good option for your non-vegetarian friends.

This dish cooks the wadi and potatoes in a tomato-onion-spiced gravy for a relative quick, definitely easy meal. Wadi go very well with potatoes, but can be cooked with other vegetables too. Today I have used a mixture of potatoes and sweet potatoes, or you can use butternut and potatoes. These mixtures are not really traditional, but work very well in the modern kitchen.

Because the wadi are extra spicy, not a lot of other spice is needed in the dish.

Similar dishes include Punjabi Wadi (Badi) and Vegetables, Aloo Baingan Wadiyan, and Mung Wadi.

Browse all of our Punjabi dishes, and all of our Potato recipes. Or explore our Early Spring dishes.

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Sweet Corn Fry with Black Pepper and Lime

Sweetcorn is one of the treasures of Summer, so creamy, full of moisture and luscious. We love them raw and also grilled – with lashings of butter, lime and black pepper. Sweetcorn soup is brilliant, and tangy chaat a perfect snack.

Another recipe we love is a spicy, peppery stir fry of sweetcorn kernels. It is very easy to make, and a great side dish. The sweetness of the corn with the tang of lime juice and the heat of the chilli and pepper – flavours layered to perfection.

Similar dishes include Sweetcorn Chaat, Sweetcorn Sundal, and Roasted Chilli Sweetcorn Salad.

Browse all of our Sweetcorn recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Vazhakkai Podimas | Plantain Mash

Podimas is the Tamil (South Indian) equivalent to a mash – potato podimas is quite divine. Here we are using plantains – the variety of banana that is primarily used green or raw. The plantain is simmered until tender, mashed or crumbled, then mixed with spices. It is a great side dish.

Similar recipes include Sweet Potato Mash with Lime Salsa, Plantain Kari, Plantain Mor Kootu, Vazakkai Poriyal, and Thani Kootu.

Browse all of our Plantain dishes and our Podimas recipes. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Sri Lankan Stir Fried Cabbage | Gowa Mallum

There is little food waste in the homes of ordinary people in India and Sir Lanka – even the most ordinary ingredient can be turned easily into something extraordinary. Cabbage, for example, is not one of Winter’s favourite vegetables, but when fried with a few spices it is transformed into something to die for.  Check out our Cabbage Thoran and this one too.

This Sri Lankan dish is very similar to a Thoran or Poriyal, with Pandanus added. It is such a common dish (and so easy to prepare) and not surprisingly there are hundreds of variations of the dish – every family will have their own way of making it. Flavoured with onion, mustard seed, fenugreek, chillies, pandan and coconut oil, it is a very easy and tasty dish.

This recipe was given to us – we are always being sent recipes and our friends and family give us ones that they want us to make. We often don’t have the source, so if you know, fill us in so we can include the details.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Kothsu, Carrot Poriyal, and Sweetcorn and Spinach Stir Fry.

Browse all of our Cabbage dishes, our Thorans and all of our Sri Lankan recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Punjabi Wadi (Badi) and Vegetables

Punjabi Wadi are urad dal-based dried balls of spicy deliciousness. Black pepper, powdered dried red chillies and spices are mixed with a paste of urad dal and then dried in hollow cakes about 5cm diameter. They are often spicy as! To use them, break into pea sized pieces, shallow fry or saute, and add to rice or vegetable dishes, dals and soups for flavour, texture and aroma. Cook until soft.

When using any type of wadi/badi, make sure that you check its spice level before adding addition chillies and chilli-based spice mixes to the dish. Urad Wadi are notoriously spicy, so add the other hot spices with caution. Sometimes 1 Wadi is enough to season a dish for 4 – 6 people.

This recipe is an easy mixed vegetable dish, aromatic and flavoursome. The wadi can be bought in any Indian grocery.

Similar recipes include Aloo Wadiyan, Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi | Potato and Eggplant Curry with Punjabi Wadi.

Browse all of our Wadi dishes and our Punjabi recipes.
All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here.

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Vazhaikkai Kari | Plantain Tamarind Side Dish

We have another kari for you today. A kari is (generally) a vegetable side dish in Tamil Nadu and it is an important part of a balanced meal. This one is plantain cooked with tamarind and some simple spices. It is easy to make and very delicious.

A kari is (generally) a vegetable side dish in Tamil Nadu and it is an important part of a balanced meal. Most people believe that the word curry comes from kari although the first term is generic for spicy dishes and the latter is a dish that can be served mild or made exotic with a variety of spices (and deep frying). There are lots of versions of the etymology of kari, but there is some agreement that its modern day usage means stir fried. Still, you will find lots of different interpretations of it. Stir-fry vegetable dishes can also be called Poriyaland some Sundals are also classified as a kari. Kari can be made with a large variety of vegetables – carrots, beans, snakegourd, broad beans, cluster beans, corn, broccoli, chow chow, plantain etc.

Similar recipes include Plantain Mash, Okra Tamarind Pachadi, Plantain Moar Kootu, Plantain Poriyal, and Thani Kootu.

Browse all of our Kari dishes and our Plantain recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Sautéed Okra with Ginger, Garlic and Coriander Leaves

We have another variation on sautéed or stir fried okra for you. It is a dish heavy with coriander leaves that lightens the deep flavours of onion, ginger and garlic. It is delicious – something that can accompany other Indian dishes, or can be eaten as a delicious mid-afternoon snack.

Similar dishes include Bhindi Bhaji, Stuffed Okra, and Al00 Bhindi.

Browse all of our Okra dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Chow Chow Kari with Coconut and Cumin

This is a delicious South Indian Style Curry where Chow Chow (also known as choko or chayote) is cooked along with spices and coconut. It is a simple dish, perfect for a weekday meal.

Chow chow, called choko in Australia, is a funny little vegetable – a prolific bearer and definitely loved by Tamil South Indians who tend to love all gourds. It is slightly bland in taste, with a delicious crispness and an internal juiciness. Divine! It is generally cooked simply – kootu, kari, poriyal or sambar.

A kari is (generally) a vegetable side dish in Tamil Nadu and it is an important part of a balanced meal. Most people believe that the word curry comes from kari although the first term is generic for spicy dishes and the latter is a dish that can be served mild or made exotic with a variety of spices (and deep frying). There are lots of versions of the etymology of kari, but there is some agreement that its modern day usage means stir-fried. Still, you will find lots of different interpretations of it. Stir-fry vegetable dishes can also be called Poriyal and some Sundals are also classified as a kari. Kari can be made with a large variety of vegetables – carrots, beans, snakegourd, chow chow, plantain, Indian broad beans, cluster beans, corn, broccoli, etc.

Similar recipes include Sri Lankan Stir Fried Cabbage, Chow Chow Molagootal, Thani Kootu, and Avial.

Browse all of our Chow Chow recipes, or explore our Early Spring recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Spicy Baked Black Chickpeas, Eggplants and Tomatoes

Black chickpeas (Kala Chana) are very common in India but not so common outside. There are two types of chickpeas – the larger light tan Kabuli chickpea, the one that is commonly used here, and the variously coloured Desi chickpea. They are green when picked early then vary through tan or beige, to speckled, dark brown and black. 75% of world production is of the smaller desi type. The larger type, also called garbanzo bean was introduced into India in the 18th century.

Desi chana are smaller and darker with a rough coat; its other names include kala chana (black chickpea) or chholaa boot. It is this variety that is hulled and split to make chana dal.

Kala Chana have a dark and earthy taste, and aren’t quite as soft and creamy as their kabuli chana counterpart. But that makes them unique and especially delicious in Wintery dishes.

Today I bake them in a spicy tomato saucy and layered with roasted eggplant and tomatoes. Served with rice, a pickle and a herby yoghurt dish, it makes a wonderful meal. There are similar dishes made with the karbuli type of chickpeas from the Middle East and beyond – Falesten has a recipe for Musaqa’a which is also worth making. This recipe is quite similar.

Similar dishes include Chana Madra, Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomatoes, Eggplant and Zucchini Bake with Chickpeas, and Baked Garlicky Eggplant.

Browse all of our Chickpea recipes and all of our Eggplant dishes.

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