Mysore Rasam with Tomatoes and Lime Juice

This recipe is the fourth in our series of Mysore style Rasam, and this one uses tomatoes and lime juice for the sour tang that is ubiquitous in South Indian food.  We already have a couple of different Mysore Rasam recipes. The recipes that use lime juice for the souring agent, rather than tamarind, have a lightness of taste, different to the deep earthy flavours of tamarind.

The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes. You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Meenakshi Ammal

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam, Cumin Seeds and Pepper Rasam, and Coriander Seed Rasam.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Mysore Rasam with Tomatoes and Lime Juice”

Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice

We already have a couple of different Mysore Rasam recipes, and today we are adding one of two Mysore Rasams that use lime juice for the souring agent, rather than tamarind. It provides a lightness of taste to the rasam, rather than the deep earthy flavours of tamarind, while still retaining the sour tastes so essential to South Indian food. We have a number of rasams that use lime, including the Mysore style rasam dishes.

Mysore Rasam comes from the city of Mysore in Karnataka, South India. It is one of the four dishes that are named after the city. The others are Mysorepak, Mysore Bonda and Mysore Masala Dosa. The defining features of Mysore Rasam are:

  1. The base of the rasam is toor dal.
  2. It uses a particular mix of spices – coriander seed, dried red chillies, and pepper corns. Bengal gram is also included in its spice mix.
  3. Usually, but not always, coconut is included in the rasam. You will see that the two recipes for Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice do not contain coconut.
  4. The rasam is thicker than many of the more watery rasam varieties.

Because this rasam is based on dal, when it is being served the Sambar is usually omitted, and the rasam becomes the showpiece of the meal.

The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes. You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Meenakshi Ammal Cook and See

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam with Tomatoes and Lime Juice, Mysore Rasam, Cumin Seeds and Pepper Rasam, and Coriander Seed Rasam.

Browse all of our Mysore Rasam recipes, all of our Lime Rasams, and all of our Rasam recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice”

Lime Rasam with Cumin Seed and Black Pepper

Today we have another Rasam recipe to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one has a slight toor dal base, uses fewer spices (mainly cumin and black pepper) and uses lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the third of her methods.

The Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See contains traditional Tamil rasam recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Early Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Lime Rasam with Cumin Seed and Black Pepper”

Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)

Here is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one is another using lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. It is often prepared as a dish for people who are or have been ill – no tamarind, mustard seeds or chillies. Instead, curry leaves are sautéed in ghee and added to the rasam with coriander leaves.

There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the fourth of her methods. The delight of providing multiple ways of making one dish is (if you love to explore the subtleties of flavour, as I do), you can make them side by side and examine their tastes.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

See all of the Lime Rasam dishes here.

Similar recipes include Lime Rasam with Cumin Seed and Black Pepper, Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)”

Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder

Today there is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one has a slight toor dal base, uses sambar powder, and uses lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the second of her methods.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

Similar recipes include Lime Rasam with Cumin Seed and Black Pepper, Rasam with Curry Leaves, Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Early Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder”

Garlic Rasam

The health benefits of garlic in the diet are well known. Pair garlic with Long Pepper and you have an immune boosting rasam. Long Pepper is well known in Ayurveda to have multiple health benefits. It also is known by numerous names in India – Pippali, Thippili, Kandathippilis, Desavaram.

This rasam is flavoured with the Pippali and Garlic, as well as black pepper, cumin seeds, chilli and curry leaves. With such layerings of flavours, how could it not be delicious?

Are you interested in other Rasams? Try Lime Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, Kottu Rasam, and another version of Garlic Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Garlic Rasam”

Kandathippilli Rasam | Rasam with Long Pepper

Years ago, an ayurvedic doctor, Prof. Dr Kulkani, would come from Pune in India to Sydney to deliver courses on Ayurveda. I wasn’t a practitioner, just interested, and would attend as many of these as I could. He would talk about Pippalli (aka Thippalli) a lot, a powerhouse spice with many health giving properties. It impacted me so much that I usually keep some at home. In English it is known as Long Pepper and is grown and used in Indonesia as well. It has a peppery, interesting flavour, and has many culinary as well as medical uses.

Meenakshi Ammal has a rasam that uses not only the Long Pepper (Kandathippilli or Desavaram) but also Arisithippili (rather like pieces of root or stem). These add a special flavour to the rasam. I can’t always get Arisithippilli, so I omit it when not available.

This rasam is flavoured with the Thippilli peppers, black pepper, cumin seeds, chilli and curry leaves. With such layerings of flavours, how can it help but be delicious?

Are you interested in other Rasams? Try Garlic Rasam, Tomato Indian Rasam Style, Kottu Rasam, and Garlic Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Kandathippilli Rasam | Rasam with Long Pepper”

Brinjal Rasam | Eggplant Rasam | and Eggplant Rasam with Rosewater

Brinjal Rasam is a type of Mysore Rasam, but with eggplant added. It is a delightful combination – whether in sambar or Rasam, toor dal and eggplant are a match made in heaven. It is another recipe from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See.

One of the interesting notes that Ammal Auntie makes in Mysore Rasam is that the addition of Rose petals (or rose water) to Mysore Rasam (the second method) brings out the flavour and provides a nice rose scent. She is right! If you are going to try this, best leave out the asafoetida. The rose water has a tang of its own, and it tames some of the rasam’s spiciness. The scent is certainly there and it is not unpleasant, as strange as it may seem. It does go well with the eggplant.

Continue reading “Brinjal Rasam | Eggplant Rasam | and Eggplant Rasam with Rosewater”

Easy Tomato Pepper Rasam

Sometimes, particularly when cooking large batches of dishes, we skip corners and the steps that enhance the complexity and sophistication of the dish go by the wayside. And this is Ok – it still tastes jolly amazing.

This rasam is in that category. The recipe is for 2’ish cups (four small serves or 2 large ones), but it can be scaled up. This is the way that rasam is often cooked when 30 or so people need to be fed, and in our house, it might be made this way when it is 15 mins to dinner time and we just need to get it on the table.

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Mysore Rasam | Second Method

This is our second version of Mysore Rasam from Meenakshi Ammal. It varies slightly from the first version, but as we know with Indian cooking small changes can make significant taste differences.

Mysore Rasam is similar to Kottu (Plain) Rasam, in that it includes toor dal to give the rasam a beautiful silky texture. It also uses the water from cooking the dal to round out the flavours. It is also rather like Plain Dal Rasam with different spices. And in this recipe, rasam powder is not used, rather the spices are sauteed and ground while the toor dal cooks.

You might also be interested in reading about the difference between Rasam and Sambar.

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam with Tomatoes and Lime Juice, Mysore Rasam with Lime, Eggplant Rasam, Easy Tomato Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, Spicy Tomato and Dal Soup, and Pepper Rasam.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Mysore Rasam | Second Method”