Bami Titvash | Armenian Pickled Okra

We like to keep some pickles on our shelves – usually in the fridge for longer storage. Given our current focus on Okra, it was wonderful to realise that these can be pickled as well as our usual ones – carrots, jicama, cumquats, quinces, onions, ginger – pickles feature big here.

This is an Armenian Pickle, from Arto Der Haroutunian’s Middle Eastern Vegetarian Dishes – my old copy that I bought at a second hand stall in about 1985. I love this book.

The recipe would be quite tweak-able, and I am quite excited about it. As the jars lined up on the shelf, I imagined it with various other spices included. This will stay on our list of often-repeated dishes for some time. It is surely a nice way to use up an over-abundant crop from the kitchen garden.

It’s a long wait though. Between the easy part – placing them in the jar with spices and vinegar – an eating them is the difficult part, that of waiting 8 weeks. Oh well, just imagine, in early Winter we will have pickled Okra with our meals. A nice thought.

Are you after other Okra Recipes? Try Crispy Okra, Okra with Chilli Spice Paste, and Goan Fried Okra. Read more about Okra here.

Or perhaps you are wanting other pickles? Try Pickled Jicama, Pickled Lemon Slices, and Quince Pickle.

We have one other Armenian dish – Green Peppers in Yoghurt.

If you are keen for more information, browse all of our Pickles and all of our Okra recipes. Our Middle Eastern Recipes are here. Take a look at Arto’s dishes that we have made. Or take some time to explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Bami Titvash | Armenian Pickled Okra”

Jicama and Green Mango Salad

Crunchy and apple-like in texture and flavour, Jicama makes a wonderful addition to salads. You can cook it, but I love it raw.

This salad combines Jicama with green mango and optionally red or white radish as well. The green mango-chilli-lime component is a great set of flavours commonly found in Mexico and in South East Asia.

Jicama is rarely available here except in the best Asian Groceries and Green Groceries. Its season is Autumn through early spring, so I grab one or two when I see them. These past months I have been lucky enough to locate and exceptional Asian market and they have them regularly.

Are you looking for more Jicama recipes? You might also like to try these: Pickled Jicama, Vegetable Sticks with Spices, Spicy Radish and Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk, and A Host of Spring Salads.

Our Green Mango recipes include Vermicelli and Green Mango Salad, Pomelo Salad, and White Peas and Green Mango Sundal.

You might like to try other Bittman Salads. They include Roasted Red Pepper Salad with Mozzarella and White Beans, Cucumber Salad with Capers and Ricotta, and Fig and Almond Salad.

Are you still looking for more? Browse all of our Salad recipes here, our Green Mango dishes here, and all Jicama Recipes here. All of the Bittman Salads are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes here.

Continue reading “Jicama and Green Mango Salad”

Salad of Marinated Zucchini and Tomatoes

Zucchini takes extremely well to marination, particularly with Mediterranean flavours such as garlic, olive oil, oregano. Mix them up and leave for 30 mins – 1 hour, then serve. You can mix them with Bocconcini, for example, or, like this recipe, with some beautiful tomatoes. Fresh, young zucchini has the most glorious texture.

I have used small cherry tomatoes here, but use any tomatoes you have – halving or slicing them depending on the size. I like to mix green, semi ripe and ripe tomatoes as it gives variation in flavours, but this is probably only possible if you or your best friend grow your own tomatoes. Green tomatoes are difficult to find these days, yet I love them.

Throw in a small zucchini flower or two if you have them.

Are you looking for other Tomato Salads? Try Artichoke Hearts with Tomatoes Salad, My Mother’s Tomato and Cucumber Salad with Creamy Dressing, and the very red Tomato and Pomegranate Salad.

Or are Zucchini dishes your preference? Try Zucchini Rice, Zucchini Fry, and Poached with Other Vegetables in Wine.

All of our Salads are here for you to browse. Or just our Tomato Salads. All Tomato Recipes can be seen here. Browse our Zucchini Recipes or trawl through our Late Summer collection of dishes.

Continue reading “Salad of Marinated Zucchini and Tomatoes”

Quick Lemon Marmalade

Late Autumn sees the first lemons, and jam is a perfect way to begin using them.

Autumn brings such a wealth of fruits that can be preserved in some way – Pomegranates, Quinces, Tomatoes, Crab Apples and new Ginger are abundant, and a few lemons are becoming available.

One easy way to use up a surfeit of lemons and provide breakfast jam for the coming winter is to make this quick lemon marmalade. No tedious slicing involved – it is all done by the food processor.

Are you looking for recipes that use lemons? Try Quick Pickled-Preserved Lemon Slices in Oil, Lemon Rice, and Lemony Sago with Coconut Milk.

Other jams that you might like to try are Quick Strawberry Jam, Tomato and Chilli Jam (savoury), and Cumquat Marmalade.

You might like to browse all of our Jams and all of our recipes for Lemons.  Or be inspired by our collection of easy Mid-Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Quick Lemon Marmalade”

An Autumn Fruit Salad with Pomegranates, Pears, Apples

A quick dessert celebration of Autumn. Apples, Pears and Pomegranates are brought together with yoghurt and a touch of spice for a quick, easy and delicious dessert. It’s also wonderful at breakfast time (top your cereal or oats with it) and an any-time snack. Try it also with our Bondi Bircher Muesli.

Are you after other Desserts? Try Butter Glazed Apple, Baked Apple with Star Anise and Baked Pears with Marsala.

For more recipes, browse all of our Apple Recipes and our Pear Recipes. Find more Pomegranate recipes here, and other yoghurt recipes here. Or take some time to browse our Mid Autumn Recipes.

Continue reading “An Autumn Fruit Salad with Pomegranates, Pears, Apples”

Illaichi Chai | Cardamom Chai

The weather is cooling and Chai is back on our mind. Early morning, late evening, or in between it is a beautiful, relaxing drink. Meditative in its making, the joy and love that goes into it can be tasted in the end result. I love to make it while I am cleaning the kitchen in the evening, stirring periodically, and loving the aroma of the brewing chai. Then to cuddle up on the lounge with a cuppa – ah, heaven on a cold night.

Try some other Chai recipes too. Try Heavenly Gentle Chai, Ashram Chai, and Yogi Chai.

All of our Chai recipes are here. You might like to browse all of our Teas, and our Indian Recipes too. Or simply explore our Early Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Illaichi Chai | Cardamom Chai”

Green Chutney | Indian Mint and Coriander Chutney

This is one of the ubiquitous chutneys of India, made with Mint and/or Coriander, and served with so many snacks, used in sandwiches and slathered onto street food. India has a glorious tradition of mishing and mashing things together to make the most inspired chutneys, and other dishes such as Bhartas.

Use it as a spread or a dip. It goes well with Pakora, Samosa, Chole, Potato Chips, Vadapav, Bhel, Dhokla, Chaat and Snacks, and so much more. Make your own – store bought lacks the beautiful freshness of home made. Use it in inspired ways too – in Salad Dressings, drizzled over grilled cheese and toast, and stir into yoghurt for dips and dressings.

Are you looking for Indian Chutneys? Try Spinach Chutney, Coriander and Coconut Chutney, Apricot Chutney and Ginger Coconut Chutney.

What about some more Coriander or Mint recipes? Try Zhug (an amazing Coriander Puree), Coriander Paste, and Mint Paneer.

Want more? Browse all Indian Chutneys, and explore all our Coriander recipes and Mint recipes. All of our Indian Recipes are here. Or simply take some time with our Easy Early Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Green Chutney | Indian Mint and Coriander Chutney”

Caramelised Sweet Potatoes

This is a delicious dish – it can be a side dish or, as I like to do, eat it as a mid afternoon snack! Pretty healthy (as much as butter and some sugar can be – everything in moderation, right?) and they are definitely delicious. You can make this same recipe with carrots or pumpkins such as Butternut or Jap.

This is a great dish for Thanksgiving, if you celebrate that US festival. Other Thanksgiving recipes are here.

Are you looking for Sweet Potato recipes? Why no try Creamy Baked Sweet Potato, Madras Curry of Sweet Potato, Eggplant and Spinach, British Potato and Sweet Potato Vindaloo,  and Sweet Potato Wedges. You might also like Caramelised Roasted Pumpkin.

Have a look at our other Sweet Potato dishes here. Or check out our easy Mid Winter recipes.

Continue reading “Caramelised Sweet Potatoes”

Old Fashioned Baked Rice Pudding like My Mother Made

 

Rice pudding is such a traditional dish, born from Mother’s, Grandmothers’  and Great Grandmothers’ Winter collections of recipes. I always know when the best of Glorious Autumn is over because I bake a rice pudding. It varies every year – sometimes it is as early as early April, and sometimes as late as mid May here in the Southern Hemisphere. A dish of extreme comfort and warmth, there is something about it that connects me with my great line of ancestors.

This old fashioned, rustic dish is rather dark from the cinnamon and the brown sugar. Use white sugar if you prefer a lighter version.

Are you looking for Rice Puddings? Try our Greek Rice Pudding and Bengali Rice Kheer. Or try some other desserts – Sago Payasam, Baked Apricots with Honey and Orange, and Baked Strawberries.

Looking for more? Explore all of our Rice Puddings and all of our  other Desserts . Feel free to browse other vegetarian recipes from our first blog from 1995 – 2006 in the Retro Recipes series. Or try our easy Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Old Fashioned Baked Rice Pudding like My Mother Made”

Sampangi Pitlai

We are working through the different types of Poritha Kuzhambu, where the spice paste is fried in ghee before being ground. There are Poritha Kuzhambus, Poritha Koottu and Pitlai, Gothsu and Masiyal. They can be with and without tamarind, stuffed full of vegetables or just one or two.

This is our second Pitlai, Sampangi, which traditionally has drumsticks as part of the vegetable mix, with 3 or 4 others. The spice mix used in this recipe differs from the first Pitlai recipe – it does not include coriander or channa dal (Bengal Gram), but does include peppercorns. The chillies are ground in the paste rather than left whole in the tadka. I have been explaining to some people recently how subtle differences from recipe to recipe results in a different dish, and the taste difference is remarkable IF we allow our tastebuds the time to register. This isn’t so common in our society, we eat so fast, but in India these differences are important. The other key difference in this recipe is the variety of vegetables, as many as 4 can be used in this dish, rather than 1 or 2.

Are you looking for other Pitlai recipes? They are here. And browse other Poritha Kuzhambu and Poritha Koottu dishes. You must definitely try this Pitlai, and Amaranth Greens Soup/Pitlai. (Some of these dishes will be published later. Pop back and check if the link is not returning what you might expect.)

Explore all of our Kuzhambu recipes here and all of our Sambar dishes. You might like to browse our Indian recipes. Or simple take some time to check out our Early Autumn collection.

Continue reading “Sampangi Pitlai”

Butternut Pumpkin Cooked with Lashings of Butter and Black Pepper

Such soft buttery butternut, perfect for late Autumn

Vegetables like potatoes and pumpkin can be slow cooked very successfully. It works best with lots of butter, and of course that adds to the flavour A LOT. In this recipe, the butter helps to produce meltingly soft Butternut Pumpkin.

We began making this dish a long time ago, and it is a recipe from our Retro Recipe series – vegetarian recipes from our first blog from 1995 – 2006. It began as a quick, no fuss way to cook pumpkin while we were doing other things in and out of the kitchen, an a great vegetable to serve for Sunday lunches and winter BBQs. It has now come into its own, and we love it at any time.

Are you looking for Pumpkin recipes? Try French Cream of Pumpkin SoupRoast Pumpkin Couscous Salad, Lasagne with Spinach, Ricotta and Pumpkin, and Roasted Pumpkin Risotto.

You might also like to check out all of our Pumpkin recipes. Or browse Slow Cooked recipes. Take some time to explore our collection of easy Mid Winter recipes.

Continue reading “Butternut Pumpkin Cooked with Lashings of Butter and Black Pepper”

Pomegranate Honey

A honey that attracts attention

A delicious and healthy combination of pomegranate and honey, fabulous to eat or cook with, and winter-healthy as well.

Pomegranate Honey is a mixture of honey and the juice of pomegranate. It is healthy, and we recommend a teaspoon a day during the cold winter months. Extracting the juice can take time, but if you have a cold pressed juicer, it is really easy. You can read more about how to extract pomegranate juice here. By the way, I am not receiving any compensation for linking to this juicer, it is for information purposes only.

Are you after Pomegranate recipes? Why don’t you try Pomegranate SalsaTomato and Pomegranate Salad, and Pomegranate and Banana Salad.

What about honey recipes? Try Flattened Rice (Poha) with Banana and Honey, or Honey Roasted Carrots.

This is part of our Autumn Preserving series. You can see the other suggestions here, and even more suggestions over at Heat in the Kitchen.

You might like to explore all of our honey recipes, and all of our Pomegranate recipes. Be inspired by our easy Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Pomegranate Honey”

Seasonal Cooking | MID SPRING – 37 Recipes Not to Be Missed for Relaxed Spring Living

Mid Spring can still be capricious in its mid point between winter and summer. No matter where you are, it is a month of change. Gorgeous and sunny, or drenching spring rains – both reign in this season.

Celebrating Spring

You can also browse other Early Spring recipes:
Other gorgeous Springtime posts include:

If you have difficulty with any links, please let us know. We would love to fix them for you.

Continue reading “Seasonal Cooking | MID SPRING – 37 Recipes Not to Be Missed for Relaxed Spring Living”

Seasonal Cooking | MID AUTUMN – 37 Recipes Not to Be Missed for Relaxed Autumn Living

Enjoy these highlights from our Mid Autumn recipe collection. The weather begins its transition this month, and like all change, is a little chaotic and changeable. Windy, stormy at times, and the Autumn rains come. Cooler days intersperse the fewer warmer ones, and while it is hard to let go of cooling foods, they get somewhat heavier and more warming. We grieve the passing of Summer but look forward to what Winter brings.

You can also browse other Mid Autumn recipes:

If you have difficulty with any links, please let us know. We would love to fix them for you.

Continue reading “Seasonal Cooking | MID AUTUMN – 37 Recipes Not to Be Missed for Relaxed Autumn Living”

Pitlai | Toor Dal with Vegetables

Pitlai is a South Indian recipe using some basic vegetables and cooked in a coconut-based gravy with specific spices that have been fried in ghee. It sits close to Poritha Kuzhambu and Poritha Kootu, but the spice mix varies from these.

South India adores its rice, and so the different cuisines of the South include a huge range of gravy-like dishes that are ladled over warm rice to be mixed and enjoyed. It makes sense, right? Rasam, Sambar, Kuzhambu, Kootu etc are the most common. Pitlai sits in that group too, and some will say it is a type of Sambar and others will say it is a type of Kuzhambu. Meenakshi Ammal sits her Pitlai recipes within her Poritha Kuzhambu and Poritha Kootu section – those with a fried spice mix/ paste. The dish varies slightly from any of the above – in consistency, spices used, and the vegetables that are added – bitter gourd and eggplant are definite favourites. Like the other Poritha dishes, it is the ground paste of spices, the coconut, and the predominance of lentils, that serve to thicken the dish. A tiny amount of rice flour can help if needed.

Pitlai includes coriander and Bengal Gram in its coconut-based spice paste, and this is the difference from the Poritha Kootu and Poritha Kuzhambu pastes. As I say about South Indian dishes – change out one spice and the dish has a different name, a different way of eating, a different time of day to eat it and different vegetables to include in it. 🙂

Pitlai is made all over South India and each region will have its own interpretation of the dish. This is a recipe from the Tamil Brahmin Cuisine.

Are you looking for other Kuzhambu? Check out our Poritha Kuzhambu dishes. Also try Green Chilli Kuzhambu, Masala Kuzhambu with Gram Flour Vadai, and Tomato Kuzhambu.

You might like to try some Sambar. We recommend Moru Sambar, Classic Seasoned Sambar, and Sambar Powder and Paste.

Why not have a look at all our Kuzhambu dishes, and all Kootu. All of the Sambar dishes are here. Browse the Meenakshi Ammal recipes. Or take some time to explore our easy Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Pitlai | Toor Dal with Vegetables”