Brown Lentil Sprouts Sundal | An Indian Salad

Sundals are very easy to make once your base ingredient – usually a lentil or pulse – is cooked. They are often called “salads” but there isn’t really a Western equivalent.

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I found some unidentified brown lentils in the pantry, as one does, and so sprouted them. They were difficult to sprout, taking their time indeed. Yet some days later I had a bowl of wonderful sprouts and crunchy lentil bases.

The sprouts were made into a Sundal.  Sundals are very easy to make once your base ingredient – usually a lentil or pulse – is cooked unless it is soft enough to use raw. These are quickly sauteed with spices – black mustard seeds, asafoetida, ginger, red and green chillies. Sundals are often called “salads”, and in an Indian context, that is true as they are much lighter dishes than many curries.

You can use any sprouts for this recipe.

You might also like to try Mung Sprouts Sundal, Sprouted White Pea Sundal, Sprouted Green Gram Sundal, and Masoor Dal Sprouts Sundal. Also explore Sweet Corn Sundal, Adzuki Bean Sundal, Sprouted Green Gram Sundal, and White Pea Sundal. Or you can make a sundal with du Puy Lentils or some mung dal, equally as delicious.

Explore all of the Sundal Recipes, they are all quick and gorgeous.

Continue reading “Brown Lentil Sprouts Sundal | An Indian Salad”

A Gorgonzola Snack

Guaranteed to relax you.

Take one book, a wedge of gorgonzola, some figs if you have them, some walnuts and celery stalks. Continue reading “A Gorgonzola Snack”

Paneer Toasties | Paneer Toasted Sandwiches

Indian sandwiches are serious business, taking as much time and attention as some other dishes.

Indian sandwiches and toasties are serious business. Australia is different. Here, we throw sandwiches together quickly, little preparation is involved, they are quick solutions to satisfying hunger at home, work, school or on the road, on a picnic or at the beach.

In India, the fillings are constructed with as much thought and preparation as any other meal. Ingredients are made, other ingredients are sautéed, some are cooked, and then they all come together with chilli for a delicious meal-in-a-sandwich.

Enjoy this one. It is delicious.

You might also like to try Tawa peas, Bhajji, or Bean Paruppu Usili. Browse all Indian snacks here. or just the Sandwiches and Toasties. Or be inspired by our Autumn dishes here and here.

Continue reading “Paneer Toasties | Paneer Toasted Sandwiches”

Pomelo and Green Mango Salad with Asian Flavours

This salad has such a fresh taste, embodying the joys of summer.

Ottolenghi has done it again. This is the first time that we’ve used Pomelo and it is a delightful find. Let me say, however, that it is a lot of work to peel and remove the membrane, but once the trick is discovered it is not a difficult task.

This salad has such a fresh taste, embodying the joys of summer. I wonder why pomelo is not very popular in Australia as this dish is very much a beach-side picnic dish or a country-drive-and-picnic dish.

Are you looking for Pomelo recipes? Try Three Citrus Salad with Green Chilli and GingerPomelo Salad with Avocado, Pomelo and Carrot Salad, and Pomelo, Green Mango and Pea Eggplant Salad with Tamarind Dressing.

Ore perhaps other Green Mango recipes? Try Green Mango and Lemon Rice, and Jicama and Green Mango Salad.

Are you looking for other Salads? Try Buddha’s Delight Salad, Kylie’s Tofu and Asian Herb Salad, and Ottolenghi’s Beetroot, Black Olive and Orange Salad.

Or browse all of our Pomelo dishes, all of our Salad Recipes and our Ottolenghi recipes. Or be inspired by our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Pomelo and Green Mango Salad with Asian Flavours”

Spicy Crunchy Herby Salad with Asian Style Dressing

This is a salad to wake you up and enliven your senses. Fueled with chilli, then the heat is softened (a little) with herbs and crunchy ingredients, and then it is dressed with Asian ingredients.

This is a salad to wake you up and enliven your senses. Fueled with chilli, then the heat is softened (a little) with herbs and crunchy ingredients, and then it is dressed with Asian ingredients. Better than coffee, you will be full of energy in no time! 😀😘

You might also like to try Peaches with Asian Flavours, Caramelised, Marinated King Oyster Mushrooms, or Sprouted Mung Bean Sundal/Salad. Browse our Carrot Salads here, and Salads here and here. Be inspired by our Summer recipes here and here.

Continue reading “Spicy Crunchy Herby Salad with Asian Style Dressing”

Shaved Asparagus Salad

This salad is a lot of fun, and the shaved asparagus is fresh and delightful.

This salad is a lot of fun, but a bit of work to shave the stalks. It is easier if you find large stalked Asparagus, but make sure it is not stringy.

You might also like to try Asparagus Soup, Cream of Asparagus Soup, Asparagus in Pastry, or Asparagus Pesto. All of our Asparagus recipes are here and here. You might like to browse our Salad recipes here and here. We have a selection of Bittman Salads. Or find inspiration in Summer Dishes here and here.

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Potato Subzi | Dry Potato Curry

Who can go on a carb-free diet when dishes like this exist?

When Yamuna Devi studied Vedic Cooking, she studied with Srila Prabhupada for 3 months. She tells that in the study of vegetables, they spent  weeks on potatoes, exploring basic methods of cooking, learning how to control the taste and appearance of a dish without diminishing its nutritive value.

When I was in India recently I heard one visitor bemoaning the fact that there seemed to be so few vegetables in Indian food. Of course that is not true, but if you eat in restaurants only, it may appear that way. There is a wealth of vegetables – many more than we are used to here – including countless varieties of greens and innumerous salad style dishes. India produces one of the largest assortments of vegetables, fruits and legumes in the world. You only have to visit any market to see how this is true.

Sauce-free Indian curries like this one are really just slightly-more-elaborate vegetable sautés—toast spices in some fat, add in your vegetables, and finish with salt and sometimes a touch of sugar to season the simple, healthful spicy glaze that now coats the vegetables. Simple, but deceivingly flavour-packed and delicious.

Are you looking for other Subzi recipes?.Try Okra Subzi, Kohlrabi Subzi, Carrot and Peas Subzi, and Sweet Potato Subzi.

Are you are looking for Potato recipes? Try Saag Aloo, Aloo Gobi, Arai Puli Kuzhambu (Potatoes in Tangy Gravy), Potato and Sweet Potato VindalooDoodh Wale Aloo (Milkman Potatoes), Aloo Palak (Potatoes and Spinach), and Nachi’s Sweet Potato and Eggplant Madras Curry.

Browse all of our Potato recipes, our Subzi recipes, and all of our Indian recipes. Find inspiration in our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Potato Subzi | Dry Potato Curry”

Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi | Potato and Eggplant Curry with Punjabi Wadi

An excellent curry from the Punjab region.

There are many types of wadi/vadai from all over India — this dish takes large Punjabi ones made of sundried lentils and spices (urad dal, mung dal, black pepper, cumin, chillies etc.)

The wadis add flavour, but they also add a wonderful texture to dishes, and being so dry they soak up the wettest of gravies making the dish perfectly composed with a thickness that is delectable. You can get them at your Indian Grocer, but you might like to call first and ask if they stock them. Ask for the large Punjabi Wadi. Or you can make your own!

You might also like to try our Punjabi Dal Makhani recipes. You might also like to try other Subzi recipes. Browse all of our Potato recipes here and here, all Eggplant recipes here and here, or all of our Indian recipes here and here. Find inspiration in our easy Autumn recipes here and here.

Continue reading “Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi | Potato and Eggplant Curry with Punjabi Wadi”

MID SPRING 8 Special Recipes for Mid Spring | Seasonal Cooking

In this month mid way between cold and warmth, wet and dry, here are some recipes that you might not have tried before.

In this month mid way between cold and warmth, wet and dry, here are some recipes that you might not have tried before.

You can also browse Indian Deliciousness for Mid Spring and Salad and Vegetable Dishes for Mid Spring.

Continue reading “MID SPRING 8 Special Recipes for Mid Spring | Seasonal Cooking”

Fig and Fresh Pecorino Salad

A fresh and inviting salad.

This salad has survived the years. It came about because I had some figs sitting on the kitchen bench, and some left over fresh pecorino. In a hurry, I threw them together in a salad with glorious results.

Figs, surprisingly, take acid very well, rocket too, so be generous with the lemon or lime juice.

The salad is fresh and inviting, and we have been known to have it for a Late Summer breakfast with a cup of coffee. Enjoy!

Are you looking for Fig recipes? Try Baked Figs with Cheese and Honey, White Fig and Rocket Salad, Fig Salad with Hazelnuts and Mesclun, Figs with Rosewater and Almonds, and Figs Baked with Thyme.

Browse all of our Salads, or all of our Fig recipes here. Or enjoy browsing our Late Summer recipes.

We first made this dish in 2003, and it has survived the test of time. Feel free to browse other recipes from our Retro Recipes series – vegetarian recipes from our first blog from 1995 – 2006.

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Tomato Salad with Balsamic and Majoram

Grounding our salads for cooler weather, heading into Autumn

As Summer wanes, we turn more to the harder herbs in our salads. Tarragon, Marjoram, Oregano, Sage. They add a substance, a groundedness to our salads that is not provided by basil, coriander, mint, parsley (well maybe parsley).

I have often wondered why English recipes, for example, as good as modern English cooking is, prefer to use the harder herbs all summer, and I conclude that it is their weather – much cooler there than our blistering 45C days in Summer. But as Autumn approaches, we can take a leaf from our English cousins and introduce the harder herbs. Judiciously, of course. One cannot use them with the free abandon that we use green coriander, parsley and basil. The tastes are much harder, a little astringent, more – well, more wintery if truth be told. You can tell that they are leading the way into the colder weather, where we will use bay and juniper berries and black cardamom.

Continue reading “Tomato Salad with Balsamic and Majoram”

Pulse Ball Moar Kuzhambu | Buttermilk Gravy with Ground Lentil Balls | Yoghurt Curry with Lentil Dumplings

Pulse balls, or lentil dumplings, are added to the moar kuzhambu (spicy yoghurt gravy) to make a delicious South Indian dish.

Moar (or Mor or Moru) Kuzhambu is commonly prepared in South India and is extremely easy to make, taking almost no time at all to cook. This one includes the lentil dumplings and so takes a little longer. The base for this dish with the lentil dumplings is Moar Kuzhambu, but rather than add vegetables or vatral, balls of ground lentils and spices are made (pulse balls) and added to the base.

S. Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See set of books has 2 Moar Kuzhambu (Buttermilk/Yoghurt spicy gravy) with Lentil Dumplings made from ground lentils.

This Pulse Ball Moar Kuzhambu differs from the second version of this dish. The ground lentil balls are a little different, and steamed rather than cooked in the buttermilk and coconut gravy.

Are you looking for other Yoghurt recipes? Apart from the other Moar Kuzhambu with Lentil Dumplings, try Moar Kuzhambu, Moar SambarAvail – Veggies in a Yoghurt and Coconut Sauce, and Mushroom Curry with Yoghurt Sauce.

Or try other Kuzhambu recipes: Green Chilli Kuzhambu, Masala Kuzhambu with Gram Flour Vadai, and Lentil Balls in a Spicy Kuzhambu Gravy.

You might also like to try a host of different lassi drinks.

You can find all of our Kuzhambu recipes here, and all of our Indian recipes here. Or explore our collection of Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Pulse Ball Moar Kuzhambu | Buttermilk Gravy with Ground Lentil Balls | Yoghurt Curry with Lentil Dumplings”

Mozzarella Salad with Crispy Tomato Crumbs

Fresh Mozzarella balls, tomatoes, basil, olive oil and pomegranate are always a perfect combination.

There is a great salad that I make which consists of torn mozzarella balls, olive oil, pomegranate molasses, tomatoes, cucumber, pomegranate seeds when I can get them. It is easy, quick and very satisfying and it more often than not will form a complete meal for me. This is a twist on that salad.

You might also like to try Grilled Fennel with Mozzarella, Fresh Mozzarella Salad with Tomatoes and Cucumbers, and Tapenade Bread Salad with Tomatoes and Mozzarella.

All the Mozzarella recipes are here. And Salad recipes are here and here. Or find some inspiration in the Summer recipes here and here.

Continue reading “Mozzarella Salad with Crispy Tomato Crumbs”

Watermelon and Peach Salad with Basil

This salad will change your mind about using watermelon in savoury ways

Goodness, how good watermelon is in the Summer. But we rarely use it in a savoury way. Rather, the mind brings images of slurping great arcs of watermelon at the beach, the juice running down your chin and arms.

But watermelon accepts acidic ingredients very well – limes, lemons, salt etc. And therefore making salads with it for those 45C days of Australian Summers is a perfect solution to the heat. Along with a Gin and Tonic, of course.

We have a collection of Watermelon Salads for you to explore – we brought together all our favourite salads in one post.

You might also like to try Watermelon Salad with Mint and Olives, Spicy Red Radish and Watermelon Salad, Haloumi and Watermelon Salad, or Tomato and Peach Salad. Or try your hand at Strawberry Sorbet.

Browse our Watermelon Salads (and all of our Watermelon recipes), our Peach recipes, and our many Salad recipes. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Watermelon and Peach Salad with Basil”

Crushed Du Puy Lentils with Tahini and Cumin

This sustaining meal-on-a-plate is a little bit like hummus, though much easier and quicker to prepare. Eat with warm flatbread and a salad.

It is a very very cool summer’s day, full of storms and we are all reaching for our unused jackets to keep warm. We look for something more substantial and comforting today from the kitchen.

I love the lentils of India and the Middle East, and I love the lentils of the West (although a much more limited range). Commonly, lentils soften much more quickly than most dried beans and peas, and take only 20 – 40 minutes to cook. While red lentils (masoor dal), fall apart in the cooking (so making them perfect for soups), brown and green varieties hold their shape, making them a very good base on which to layer other foods. A pan of cooked lentils – braised with carrots, onions, celery, hard herbs and vegetable stock – is a useful thing to have in the fridge, ready to for the basis for turning yesterday’s leftover dishes into a whole new meal.

You might also like to try Indian Du Puy Lentil Sundal Salad, Kosheri – Rice with Vermicelli and Lentils, and Du Puy Lentil Soup.

Browse through our Du Puy recipes, and you might like to explore all of our Ottolenghi recipes. Be inspired by our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Crushed Du Puy Lentils with Tahini and Cumin”