Tomato Rasam

A oft-made rasam, the favourite rasam of many people.

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Like a warming, comforting cup of spicy deliciousness, rasam is such special dish. It is no wonder it is a daily item in many Tamil households.

One of the most common rasams is tomato rasam. Full of spice, tangy from tamarind, and made with home grown organic tomatoes, it is not only delicious but healthy also.

We like to make rasams with the top water from cooking lentils – it adds flavour, uses the water that is usually drained off, and if some of the soft lentils actually get into the rasam, it just adds more flavour and a little texture.

I often keep home made tomato pulp and tomato juice in the freezer – even frozen whole tomatoes. These are perfect for making rasam.

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Garlic Rasam | Poondu Rasam | A Gem from South India with Cherry Tomatoes

A health giving rasam.

I adore rasam and when I am in India it is one of the trifecta of dishes that must have most days – rasam, sambar and idli. It is not difficult to make and mostly is very quick. A pan, a spice grinder (or appliance to do the same), your spices, some tamarind and often some tomatoes. Although it is a very traditional dish, I do sometimes feel free to play with the rasam concept. I call it Fusion Cooking, or AusIndian food.

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Keerai Poriyal | Stir Fried Spinach with Coconut and Spices

A quick spinach and coconut dish.

Poriyals are generally finely chopped vegetable dishes that are tasty and easy to make. It takes only a few minutes, and coconut is added at the last moment.

You might also like to try Spinach Curry, Spinach, Miso and Tofu Napoleons, and Aloo Palak – Potatoes in Spinach Gravy.

Perhaps you are looking for other Thoran/Poriyal recipes here and here, or other Vegetable Fry recipes. You might also like our Spinach recipes here and here. Or you might like to browse Indian recipes here and here. Check out our easy Autumn recipes here and here.

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Sweet Pongal | Sakkarai Pongal without Milk

A beautiful sweet dish for Pongal, or any time. Enjoy!

A great dish at any time, sweet, nourishing and comforting, and especially good for the South Indian Thai Pongal Festival and similar festivals in other parts of India, in January. A mixture of rice and mung dal sweetened with jaggery, it is a warming and comforting dish.

You might be looking for other Pongal recipes. There are sweet versions (sakkarai), and you might like to try the others: Sakkarai Pongal from Jaffna; Sakkarai Pongal with Milk and Sakkaria Pongal without Milk.

And there is a savoury version, called Ven Pongal. You can see that one here.

Or browse all of our Kitchadi recipes here and here, and our Rice recipes here and here. Have a look at all of our Indian dishes. You might like to take some time and browse all of our Mid Summer recipes.

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Lemony Yoghurt Dressing

A creamy delightful dressing.

This dressing is so delicious you will want to smother your salad in it. The trick is to sweeten the dressing with a little honey.

Looking for similar recipes? Try Garlic-Yoghurt Dressing, Roast Capsicum Sauce and Dressing and Tahini Dip and Dressing.

Browse our Salad Dressing recipes here and here, and our Salad recipes here and here. Our yoghurt recipes are here and here. Or be inspired by our Summer recipes here and here.

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Tawa Peas | Pan Fried Peas, Broad Beans or Edamame | Street Food

Quickly pan fried with salt and chilli, these are delicious snacks.

A great snack, quickly prepared, is pan fried edamame. You can use peas as well. I like to do this with shelled peas and beans, but you can also make this with peas and edamame in their pods. Simply suck them out of the shell between your teeth after cooking. This can even be made with broad beans.

Are you perhaps after Broad Bean recipes? Try Pan Fried Broad Beans with Tomatoes and Thyme, and Pan Fried Broad Beans with Lime, Chilli and Salt.

Also try these beauties: Fava Bean Puree with Dill, Glorious Five Bean Salad, and Broad Bean and Butter Bean Spread.

Browse our Pea recipes here and here, and all of our Snacks here and here.  Be inspired by our Spring recipes here and here.

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Thengai Saadham | South Indian Coconut Rice

Try this coconut rice from Sth India with your next curry.

In Australia, rice as a savoury dish was rare until perhaps the 1990’s. We grew up rarely eating rice – in fact I can’t really remember my mother cooking it other than as a sweet dish. And as Australia adopted rice as an accompaniment to savoury dishes, it was always plain boiled rice to soak up sauces – the occasional curry, English stews, vegetable braises etc. Times have changed and we have been influenced by our Asian and Indian migrant populations, and many families would now own a rice cooker.

This is a South Indian Coconut rice dish from Tamil Nadu. There is a Balinese Coconut Rice also, Nasi Lemak, you can see it here. The Balinese one is made with coconut cream, while this recipe is made with fresh/frozen coconut.

Similar recipes include Kiribath – Sri Lankan Coconut Rice, Green Mango and Coconut Rice, and Balinese Coconut Rice.

You might also like to try Urad Dal Garlic Rice, Peppered Rice, Tamarind Rice and Mango Rice.

There are several ways to cook rice – Absorption method, Steaming or Oven Finished Rice.

Check our different Coconut Rice Recipes. Or simply browse all of the Rice dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Escarole Salads with Millet and Chickpea Flour Pancake-Style Flatbread

Escarole, that slightly bitter green beloved of Italians, Barley Malt, a sweetener with a dark, grounded flavour and Ragi or millet flour all come together for a delicious meal.

Now I find the simplest and best way to use escarole is in salads, sliced into small but not too small pieces, and then laden with some cooked lentils, left over chickpea salad, cumquat pickles, halved tiny tomatoes, home-made mung bean sprouts, finely chopped herbs and lots of parmesan. (Use almost anything that you have ready in the fridge.)

Escarole LOVES parmesan so feel free to add grated or shaved parmesan.

Browse our Salad Dressing recipes here and here, and our Salad recipes here and here. Our yoghurt recipes are here and here. Or be inspired by our Summer recipes here and here.

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Peas and Bengal Gram Flour Sundal | Mochai Kottai Sundal

An unusual dish – a Sundal with Gram Flour

This Sundal is a little different to other Sundals, those quickly stirfried salads of south India. A Gram Flour mix is poured over the Sundal towards the end of cooking. This recipe comes from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See Part 2. It is unusual to say the least, but delicious and filling. It could almost be an Usili, although Amma includes it under Sundals.

You might also like to try Red Lentil (Masoor Dal) Sprouts Sundal, Coconut, White Peas and Green Mango Sundal, Channa (Chickpea) Sundal, and Mung Dal Sundal. Or you can make a sundal with Adzuki Beanes (Red Chori) or some White Pea Sprouts, equally as delicious.

Feel free to browse our many Sundal recipes. If you are new to Sundals, these posts will also introduce you to this wonderful, stirfried, lentil-based dish from Tamil Nadu, South India.So explore them all, they are all quick and gorgeous. All of our Indian dishes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. And try our White Pea dishes. Or take some time to explore our Mid Spring collection of recipes.

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An Ode To Rasam – Thakkali Paruppu Rasam

Sometimes rasam is a complete meal.

Rasam is one of those amazing dishes, and I am unashamed to admit that I can have a large serving of rasam with a small salad for a light dinner. Last night I had a couple of bowls of rasam plus a perfectly ripe avocado, eaten in its skin, sprinkled only with some sea salt.

One can only imagine how rasam came into being. Someone scooping some of the cooking water off of lentils and throwing some spices in because they were hungry, or perhaps because they did not have anything else to eat.  It is akin to someone in Europe taking a cup of stock from a simmering pot of vegetables, adding some spices and using it as a wonderful aperitif.

If you are looking for rasam recipes, you can browse them here.

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Sprouted White Pea Sundal

A surprisingly wonderful sundal.

With white pea (pattani) sprouts sitting patiently in a jar in the fridge, I made Sprouted White Pea Sundal one morning for breakfast. I am quite a fan of white peas.

If you are new to Sundals, they are very easy to make once your base ingredient – usually a lentil or pulse – is cooked. They are often called “salads”, and in an Indian context, that is true as they are much lighter dishes than many curries. But in a Western context they are better described as lentils and pulses quickly stirfried with spices – black mustard seeds, asafoetida, ginger, red and green chillies. I love these dishes.

There is quite a list of Sundals – please click here for the complete list. You might like to particularly try: Black Gram Sprouts Sundal, Coconut, White Peas and Green Mango Sundal, and Urad Dal Sundal. We recommend Sweet Corn Sundal, Adzuki Bean Sundal, and Sprouted Green Gram Sundal. Or you can make a sundal with du Puy Lentils or some mung dal, equally as delicious.

Check out our other Sundal recipes for quick and easy snacks or side dishes. Sundals can also be used as prasadam and neivedyam for Navaratri or Ganesha Chaturthi and other Hindu Festivals. Click the links for other recipes for these festivals. Or explore our collection of Indian recipes. Our Indian Essentials are here.

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Jeera Lassi | Cumin Lassi | Traditional Indian Yoghurt Drink

Lassis are so beautiful to drink, they deserve special glassware. Enjoy!

A lassi is a blend of yogurt, water, often spices and sometimes, fruit. Traditional lassi (also known as salted lassi, or simply, lassi) is a savoury drink, flavoured with ground and roasted spices. Sweet lassi, however, contains sugar or fruits, instead of spices. Also there is a salted mint lassi that is highly favoured in Bangladesh.

Cumin Lassi is a much-loved beverage of Rajasthan. It is ubtly flavoured with dry roasted cumin seeds and limes or lemons. The zest of the citrus is often added to the milk before making yoghurt, and the oils infuse with it as the milk warms.

Lassis are enjoyed chilled as a hot-weather refreshment, mostly taken with lunch.

We have numerous Lassi Recipes for you. Or browse our relaxing teas here and here. Explore all of our Indian recipes here and here.

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Chilli and Coriander Salt Lassi | Indian Yoghurt Drink

Another beautiful lassi, this time with a hint of chilli and green coriander.

A lassi is a yoghurt based Indian drink that cools the effect of hot summers. It is originally from the Punjab and Multan in India and is usually taken with breakfast or lunch. It really is an ancient smoothie, originating around 1000 BCE.

We have numerous Lassi Recipes for you. Or browse our relaxing teas here and here. Explore all of our Indian recipes here and here.

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Lassi Khara | Neer More | Salt Lassi with Asafoetida (Hing)

Yoghurt is such a great food it is great to start the day with some. My preference in summer is to begin with a lassi taken slowly on the balcony, watching the sun rise, before the day begins. It sure beats a coffee!

A Lassi is an Indian sweet or savoury drink made from a yoghurt or buttermilk base, perhaps with water, and with flavourings. The flavourings are either fruits or spices. You may of course know the ubiquitous Mango Lassi, and perhaps the Salt Lassi (great in very hot weather).

Are you looking for other lassi recipes? We have numerous Lassi Recipes for you. Or browse our relaxing teas here and here. Explore all of our Indian recipes here and here.

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Aubergines in Coconut Milk | Thenkapal Varadhiniya | A Dish from Kerala

Another delicious recipe from Kerala.

There is something amazing about aubergine. Not only their colours and shininess, their taste varies from dish to dish. This recipe is from Kerala, a coastal Western state of India, where coconuts and bananas abound. Kerala is an amazing state, cleaner than many others with a very high literacy rate, and the only communist state in India. It is an easy state to be in, to visit and stay in, and the food is as good as anywhere. Several of my favourite Indian dishes come from Kerala.

Aubergines cooked in Coconut has a beautiful and flavoursome base of onions, garlic, ginger & spices, which is turned into a sauce with coconut milk. The sautéed aubergines soak up the sauce and the thickened gravy coats the pieces.

Are you looking for similar recipes? Try Pineapple Pulissery.

You might also want to try other dishes from Kerala, such as Avail, Aubergines in Coconut Milk, Cabbage Thoran and Neyyum Parippum.

All of the Kerala recipes are here, and our Eggplant Recipes here. The inspiration for this recipe is Madhur Jaffrey and you can see her recipes here. Browse all of our Indian dishes. Or simply explore our Late Summer dishes.

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