Cabbage Bondas

Bondas are a popular street food in parts of Indian like Mumbai. Bondas are little round dumplings made from chickpea flour and generally filled with potatoes. They are sold from street carts or footpath stores, and in those little working-men’s canteens that have wonderful, very cheap food.

It is not so hard to make them at home. We were given this recipe for cabbage bondas and they are delicious. They can be made flat into a patty, or round to resemble the potato bondas. We don’t know the source of this recipe – if you know please let us know so that we can update this post.

Similar recipes include Crispy Fried PotatoVadai with Yoghurt, Delicious and Addictive Indian Snacks, and Beetroot Vadai.

Browse all of our Indian Snacks and all of our Cabbage recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Tharuva – Crispy Fried Vegetables | Crispy Fried Potato Slices

Indian snacks, oh my. This is my take on a snack from Bihar and Jharkhand. Tharuva, or Tharua, are vegetables that are crispy fried. Plantain is commonly cooked this way. However, I have made this with potato, beetroot, melons and pumpkin. Harder vegetables I slice very thinly. Others can be cut into strips or cubes.

The vegetables are mixed in a slightly wet mix of rice flour and spices, then shallow or deep fried. Salt can be sprinkled over before serving. You will love them and will find them quite addictive.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Bondas, Vegetable Cutlets, Beetroot Vadai, and Crispy Fried Okra.

Browse all of our Potato recipes and Indian Snacks.

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Poha with Coconut and Cashews

Poha is one ingredient we keep coming back to. It is easy to use and really versatile. Here thick poha is mixed with spices, cashews and toasted coconut. It is a super snack for 2 – 3 people, or serve it along with other Indian dishes.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Bondas, Crispy Fried Potato, Kanda Batata Poha, Poha Chaat, and Kolache Poha.

We have 10 or so Poha dishes, check them out here. Or explore our Indian Snacks.

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Amavadai in Yoghurt

Amavadai are deep fried lentil patties that are spiced and, in this recipe, soaked in yoghurt. There are many ways of soaking and serving in yoghurt and we show just one simple one. These vadai are often served at festivals and weddings.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Bondas, Herby Masala Vadai, Maddur Vadai, and Beetroot Vadai.

Browse all of our Vadai and all or our Indian snacks. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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Kachumber | Chuchumber

Kachumber is a Hindi word for chopped into small pieces. It can mean any Indian salad made with a few salad vegetables that have been finely sliced or chopped and served with a wedge of lemon. Here we have the most commonly made kachumber – tomatoes, onions, cucumbers and herbs. The dressing is always lemon or lime juice and black pepper, although vinegar can be added in the Parsi version.

I have other Kachumber recipes here, but this one is simple. Quick and simple. I thought that I would include it because often that is what we want and need. It is as delicious as ever. I hope you enjoy it.

I’ve made Kachumbers using the chopping blade of a food processor, by grating some of the ingredients and by chopping by hand. Use which ever method suits you on the day.

You might like to read What is a Kachumber? And our Collection of Kachumber Salads.

Similar recipes include Apple and Grape Kachumber, Daikon and Carrot Kachumber, Chickpea (Channa) Chaat and Channa Chaat on Kovalam Beach.

You might like to try other Indian Salads and Indian Snacks. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Other Late Summer recipes can be found here.

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Baby Corn Pakoda | Makki Ke Pakore

Sweetcorn and baby corn feature periodically in Indian dishes – it is grown extensively in the Punjab and this is the area that has many different recipes for it. These pakoda can be served to accompany other dishes or they make wonderful snacks! Serve with a cuppa chai, or a glass of white wine.

This recipe is adapted from The Complete Indian Regional Cookbook  by Mridula Baljekar. My bookcases groan with cookbooks collected across the years, and I don’t purchase many new ones these days. But this book is one recent addition. It is a great compendium of modern, delicious Indian dishes.

Similar recipes include Crispy Fried Potato, Baby Sweetcorn and Green Bean Soup, Thai Baby Sweetcorn and Green Bean Soup, and South Indian Baby Corn Soup.

Browse all of our Pakoda dishes, Baby Corn recipes and all of our Sweetcorn dishes. Or explore our Indian recipes and our Indian Essentials here. Alternatively, explore our Mid Spring collection of dishes.

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Plantain Chips

One of my enduring memories of Kerala is the proliferation of freshly cooked plantain chips – delicious deep fried slices of raw banana, crispy and salty. Even when I was staying in Mylapore in Chennai, the wallah was making huge woks-full of fresh plantain chips right there on the street, so you’d get them straight from the pan.

They can be made at home of course – quite easily in fact. Just like the street wallahs, you can slice the plantain right into the hot oil if it is safe to do so. Otherwise slice them onto a plate and add to the oil. As they cook the flavourings are added to the layer of chips, or they can be salted as they come out of the pan. Madhur Jaffrey also adds curry leaves and green chilli to the oil before removing the chips – the oil does erupt a bit when you do this so I often leave it out. You can add chilli powder to the chips as they come out of the oil if you wish.

Similar recipes include Plantain Mash, Plantain Kari, Paprika Oven Chips, Polenta Crisps and Potato Wedges.

Browse all of our Indian Snacks and all of our Plantain recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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White Pea and Potato Bhatura | Vatana Bhatura

Have you heard of White Pea Bhatura? Chole Masala is a very popular north Indian dish. White Pea Bhatura is very similar except that it uses vatana or dried white peas in place of the chickpeas. As you can imagine, it is very delicious! Bhatura – oh my, a delicious puffed bread.

White peas are very popular in North India. They are smaller than chickpeas, white in colour and smooth and round. Bhatura is a deep fried puffed bread made from a fermented dough.

Chole Bhatura is often eaten as a breakfast dish, sometimes with lassi. It is also a street food snack and even a complete meal. It is often accompanied by onions, tomatoes, carrot pickle, green chutney and pickles.

This is truly delicious! Even without the Bhatura, but especially with them.

Similar recipes include White Peas Curry, White Peas Sundal, and White Peas, Coconut and Green Mango Sundal.

Browse all of our White Pea recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Winter recipes.

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Upma and Fried Upma with Ricotta

Upma is a delicious breakfast dish and snack from South India. Rava (also called Rawa, Sooji, Suji or Upma grain) is a semolina product that is cooked with spices and sometimes finely chopped vegetables for a stunningly delicious dish.

Ottolenghi, in his book Plenty More takes his version of Upma and allows it to set before pan frying wedges. It is a delicious way to use Upma and a great use of left-overs. Rather than use his recipe, I cook Upma in a more traditional South Indian way, using his method to pan fry it, then serve it with either seasoned yoghurt or ricotta.

Rava, like semolina, is a granulated wheat flour that have a grainy and coarse texture to it. There are two types available, a fine-grained version and a coarser-grained one that is better for making Upma. In general, sooji will have a finer grain than rava. If you use the fine grained one for Upma, you might have to reduce the water so that you don’t get a pasty texture.

I cook Upma until it is thick and holds shape.  One variation is to add more water to get a looser consistency. If making the fried upma, cook until it is quite thick.

As an aside and just for your information if you are interested: There are many different types of rava, perhaps thousands of regional variations. Some of the variations are because different wheats are used. One of them called Bansi Rava and also known as samba wheat in many parts of India, is a very fine powdered flour unlike the more coarsely granulated Rava. It is made from a variety of wheat called samba godumai that has a long body and slightly sharp edges on both sides.

Another famous Rava is the Bombay Rava which has a very coarse texture that is a little bigger than regular Rava. It is made from whole wheat grains of a wheat called mottai godumai. There is another type, chamba rava, which is a by-product of wheat flour. Semolina, on the other hand, is always made from Duram wheat.

Similar recipes include Buckwheat Upma, Polenta Crisps and Lemony Poha.

Browse all of our Semolina recipes and all of our Breakfast dishes. Indian Snacks are here. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Kanda Batata Poha

There is a quick and easy Batata Poha that I make – the flattened rice flakes mixed with herbs and fried potatoes, yum! This recipe is no more difficult, still quick and easy, very similar to the recipe that Tim and Saun gave me – just a few extra spices. It includes onions, steamed potatoes and peas, cashews and peanuts, coconut and warming spices. It is a light dish that is eaten for breakfast or tiffin snacks. It is perfect just with a cuppa. It can also be served for brunch, lunch or a light dinner – add some coconut chutney or a bowl of yoghurt for a quick,light and delicious meal. It can be packed into lunch boxes, taken on picnics or taken on trips as travel food. We love poha and have nearly a dozen recipes that use it.

Take note that this is made with the thick poha – poha is steamed and rolled/flattened rice – make sure that you buy poha and not puffed rice. When you visit your Indian grocery you will see that Poha comes in different thicknesses  – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). There is also poha made from red rice and brown rice as well as white rice. The thicker types are soaked before use.

Similar dishes include Poha with Coconut and Cashews, Upma and Fried Upma, Lemony Poha, Poha Chaat, and Coconut-Tamarind Poha.

Browse all of our Poha recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Autumn recipes.

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