Ambe Dal | Ambyachi Dal | Green Mango and Chana Dal

Are you a mango maniac? I have the dish for you. It’s a dish made of soaked chana dal ground with cumin and green chillies, and served with a tempering of mustard seeds and curry leaves. And most importantly, there is a generous inclusion of grated raw mango. This dish is a perfect dish for mango lovers, and is served as a snack to people who visit. It is also the best after-school snack during heatwaves.

It is very easy to make, with few ingredients. Perfect for Summer busy lives. The tartness of the mangoes, the sweetness from the coconut, the nuttiness from channa dal, and the spiciness from green chillies means that the flavours both contrast and compliment each other – is your mouth watering yet?

Ambe Dal is a Maharashtrian dish (also known as Amba or Ambyachi Dal). Usually made in Summer, this quick and easy salad is so cooling. Maharashtrian hospitality is legendary, and I can vouch for it as I have good friends from Pune. Maharashtrian cuisine has subtle variety and strong flavours and can be very mild to very spicy.

Green mangoes come in various levels of sourness, from tart to sweet-sour. Choose one that suits your own preferences. Serve Ambe Dal with rice, Kachumber, Kosumalli, and/or roti, perhaps on a banana or mango leaf.  It goes well with Aam Panna.

Are you looking similar dishes? Try Cucumber, Carrot and Green Mango Koshambari, Aamer Dal, Green Mango in Coconut Milk, and Coconut, White Peas and Green Mango Sundal.

Also try Pomelo, Green Mango and Pea Eggplant Salad with Tamarind Dressing, Vermicelli and Green Mango Salad, and Sweet and Sour Mango Curry.

Why not browse all of our Mango dishes, all Salads, our Channa Dal dishes, and all of our Maharashtrian recipes? Our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or explore our many Mid Summer dishes.

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Dal with Moth Beans | Dal with Matki Beans

Moth Beans, what a delightful name! It is pronounced as Moat beans, the delights of transliteration not making that immediately obvious. They have a delightful flavour – rich and nutty. The tiny beans go well in salads, snacks and curries, and they can be sprouted too.

Today we are cooking a dal with Moth Beans, also called Matki Beans, in the Maharashtrian style. It is tangy and delicious.

Similar recipes include Lemon Dal, Moringa Leaf Dal, Daikon Dal, and Dal Tadka.

Browse all of our Moth Bean dishes and all of our Dals. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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Khamang Kakdi Koshimbir | Maharashtrian Cucumber Salad

Another beautiful Koshimbir from Maharashtra – one that is cooling and exquisitely suited to hot summery days.

Koshimbir is Maharashtrian term for saladKosambari in Kannada and Kosumalli in Tamil are other names that you will see for Indian salads.

Many different combinations of vegetables are used to make different varieties of Koshimbir. In Maharashtra there are 2 main types of salads (although you will often see these confused, or equated):

  • Khamang Kakdi – a salad with roasted and ground peanuts, with yoghurt just as a coating or dressing
  • Kadichi Koshimbir – a salad without the crushed peanuts and with a reasonable amount of yoghurt.

This recipe is for the first type, made with cucumber, green coriander leaves, a touch of yoghurt and crushed peanuts. It is incredibly cooling, so is perfect for hot summery days. It can also be made with boiled or steamed pumpkin or potato.

Similar recipes include Cucumber, Carrot and Green Mango Koshambari. Ambe Dal, Cucumber and Pineapple Kachumber, Warm Cucumber Salad with Sesame (Cucumber Kosumalli), Kachumber (Chuchumber), Cucumber Kosumalli #2, and Cucumber Kosumalli #3.

Other Cucumber dishes you can try are Cucumber Raita, Cucumber Lassi and Olan (Cucumber and Coconut Curry).

Explore all of our Indian Salads, or all of our Indian recipes. Browse all of the Cucumber recipes too, or simply spend some time with our Early Autumn dishes.

This is a great fasting dish if made without the asafoetida (hing) and coriander leaves.

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Moraiya Kitchari with Yoghurt | Khichuri

A lovely light kitchari for recuperation, fasting or detox. Or just enjoy it at any time. I love it for breakfast.

Moraiyo, it sounds like a love song but is actually a millet, and it is a grain I have fallen in love with.

Since being introduced to Moraiyo (Barnyard Millet) by my Mahastrian friends, I have become a fan. It cooks up beautifully, and can be cooked to any texture you like, from separate grains, almost like couscous, to thicker, stoggy texture more akin to the South Indian style pongal. Add spices and perhaps some vegetables, and you have a meal – breakfast, lunch or dinner!

It is a quick and easy recipe to make – a no-fuss but loved breakfast item in this household.

This is also a fasting dish, for those who follow Hindu fasting practices.

Similar recipes include Moraiya Kitchari, Sago Kitchari, and Bhuna Kitchari with 5 Lentils.

You might like to explore other Moraiya dishes, or browse our Kitchari recipes. Our Indian recipes can all be found here and our Indian Essentials are here.. Perhaps some Spring recipes for you? Explore our Early Spring dishes.

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Kanda Poha | Onion Poha | Flattened Rice with Onions

Such a delicious snack from Northern India

Poha, a steamed and flattened rice (“steamrolled” I call it) is a great base for Indian snacks. In this poha recipe, it is teamed with onions and peanuts. Kanda Poha goes great mid afternoon with a cup of milky sweet tea (chai). Or it can be a great quick supper dish when you arrive just a little too late home from work. Or, as often done in parts of India, it is a great breakfast dish.

There are several thicknesses of poha – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). This recipe uses medium or thick poha, which you can buy from your Indian grocery. Thick is preferred. Thin poha is not suitable for this dish.

Are you looking for other Poha dishes? Try Kanda Batata Poha, Poha Chaat, Poha with Potatoes and Peanuts, Kolache Poha, and Poha with Banana, Honey and Coconut.

Browse all of our other Poha recipes and all of our Indian recipes. All of our Snacks are here. Or simply explore our easy Early Winter recipes.

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Moraiya Kitchari | Barnyard Millet Kitdchari | Sama ki khichdi | Khichuri

Moraiya Kitchari is a delightful dish, healthy and nourishing. It is regularly made for Navratri fasting, Ekadashi fasting or any other time of Hindu fasting as it is an easily digestible dish. It is delicious in its own right – lightly spiced and less vigorous of taste than many Indian dishes, but don’t put it aside because of that. Try it with a wet curry like a yoghurt or besan curry, even a Poritha Kuzhambu! You will enjoy.

Moraiya is composed of tiny, white, round grains. In India, cereal grains are not consumed during fasts. Hence, Moraiya is a popular alternative, especially during Navratri. It is often used in place of rice, although it does not cook into separate grains like long grained rice. It is quite sticky when it is cooked and the grains stick together somewhat.

Are you looking for other Kitchari dishes? Try Moraiya Kitchari with Yoghurt, Sago, Peanuts and Potatoes Kitchari, Maharashtrian Kitchari with Masoor Sprouts, and a Simple Parsi Kitchari.

You might like to check to see whether we have posted other Moraiya recipes. You can browse all of our other Kitchari recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or explore our Early Spring dishes .

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Aamti Bhaat | Maharashtrian Lentil Curry with Rice

I do love the Keralite classic Mung Dal with Ghee (Neyyum Parippum), and its offshoots – Mung Dal with Cumin and ISKON Mung Dal. Maharashtra has a dish that exhibits the same simplicity, but it is made with toor dal (and not quite so much ghee). Toor dal is the lentil that gives Sambar (from Tamil Nadu) its creamy, flowing consistency.

Simply spiced, the dish highlights the flavour of the lentils. The dish is served with rice, and is a variation on its simpler ancestor, Varan Bhaat which literally means Lentil Curry-Rice. In many Maharashtrian households, this dish or the simpler Varan is cooked every day and it is a comforting and nourishing dish. It is also made as naivedyam/prasadam for Ganesha Chathurthi. It is particularly simple to make. (If you are after other recipes for Ganesha Chathurthi, browse here.)

You might also like to try the Mung Dal dishes above, or our range of Sambars. Or try Dal Tadka, Eggplant and Toor Dal, Plain (Toor) Dal Rasam, or Poritha Kuzhambu.

Explore all of our recipes for Toor Dal here, and our Maharashtrian recipes here. Take some time and browse all of our Indian recipes. Or simply try our Mid Summer collection.

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Masoor Sprouts Rice | Maharashtrian Kitchari | Khichuri

Today’s recipe is a kitchari from Maharashtra that incorporates sprouts made from masoor lentils, and which uses Goda Masala. Goda Masala is a spice mix unique to Maharashtra. I should say, one of the several spice mixes unique to that state of India. It is a spice mix that is complex and layered in flavours. There are a whole range of dishes that use it (e.g. Masoor Sprouts Usal), and we intend to make a few over the next weeks.

Goda Masala can be difficult to get outside of Maharashtra – try in North Indian groceries, because those specialising in South Indian ingredients won’t have heard of it. You can try to make your own masala – I generally prefer to do this, but several of the spices used in Goda Masala are hard to find outside of Maharashtra, even in India.

This kitchari is pilaf style rather than the South Indian style which is more porridge-like. It uses the long grained basmati rice rather than the shorter grained rice of South India.

Similar recipes include Goan Bisibelebath.

Browse other Goda Masala recipes and our Kitchari recipes. There are other sprouts recipes, and browse all of our Maharashtrian recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Spring recipes.

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Urad Lentil Sprouts in a Sesame Coconut Yoghurt Sauce | Sabut Urad Usal

Urad sprouts are unusual, and here they are in a yoghurt gravy.

This is a dish from Maharashtra in India. Whole urad or muth beans and sprouts are the traditional favorites, but you can also use sprouted chick peas, aduki or mung beans in this dish. Sprouted beans are bursting with nutrition because they are a living, growing food. When left raw, their flavor may be strange to the newcomer. In this dish, however, flavor is obtained without sacrificing the nutritive value of the sprouts.

Check out all of the Urad recipes here and here. Perhaps you are also looking for sprouts recipes. Browse Yamuna Devi’s recipes. OR be inspired by our Autumn dishes here and here. You can also browse our Indian Essentials.

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Kolache Poha | Flattened Rice with Coconut, Tamarind and Jaggery

Tangy and lovely, an Indian breakfast dish.

Poha, or Pohe, a glorious food made by steaming and rolling rice to produce a flattened version of rice. It is very popular in South India, Maharashtria and Konkan regions of India. It also forms the basis of great snacks for those times when you just need to graze on something rather than have a full  meal.

There are several different thicknesses of poha – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). There are also poha types made from red rice and brown rice. For this dish, you want to use a white, thick poha, it gives a better result. Medium can also be used.

This dish can be used for either breakfast or snack. It is a quick, no-cook dish, except for the tadka. Because it is a cold dish it is perfect for our Summers.  It takes less than half an hour to make, and you can make it in just 5 mins if you presoak the poha and tamarind, and drain the poha.

Are you looking for Poha dishes? You could also try Kanda Batata Poha, Poha Chaat, Poha with Onions, Poha with Banana and Honey, and Poha with Potato and Peanuts.

Are you looking for breakfast dishes? Try Moraiya Kitchari, Mushrooms for Toast, and Overnight Oats.

Or browse all of the Poha recipes and all of our Breakfast dishes. Explore our collection of Indian Recipes. Or simply take some time to browse our Mid Summer dishes. Continue reading “Kolache Poha | Flattened Rice with Coconut, Tamarind and Jaggery”