Collection: Incredible Slaw Recipes

Coleslaw is part of the Australian vernacular – a ubiquitous dish that appears at every buffet, BBQ and feast. Thinly sliced cabbage with grated vegetables in a delicious creamy dressing. I admit a good coleslaw is worth hovering over.

But slaw, without the cole, can come in many forms. The word comes from the Dutch sla, a shredded or chopped salad of raw vegetables, coated in a dressing (and cole comes from kool which means cabbage).

Crisp vegetables that can be shredded easily are best for slaw.  What comes to mind, in addition to cabbage (green, red, savoy and Chinese or Napa), are carrots, parsnips, cucumbers, radishes (especially long white daikon), celery, celeriac, kohlrabi, onions, zucchini, fennel, turnips, capsicum, snow peas, asparagus, jicama, radicchio, witlof, beetroot, green mango, green papaya and even apples and Asian pears. A true farmer’s market collection.

We have some exciting slaw recipes for you, and only three of them contain cabbage! They are salads for all seasons – don’t restrict yourself to Summer slaws.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Slaw Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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Peppery Multi Coloured Salad | Kachumber

Chopped salads are so easy to make with a food processor. Simply add the ingredients and pulse until a perfect texture is achieved. This salad is a breeze with the food processor, and can be made in 2 minutes once the vegetables have been peeled.

The recipe is an Indian salad – salads of this sort are not common but also not unusual. They are a spicy take on English food no doubt. In this one we add black pepper and chilli powder to the salad, and it is dressed with lime juice.

You might like to read What is a Kachumber?

Similar recipes include Kachumber, Spring Onion Kachumber, Capsicum Salad with Tomato Dressing, Chopped Salad, Brown Lentils Sundal, Daikon, Carrot and Coconut Salad, and Maharashtrian Cucumber Salad.

Browse all of our Indian Salads, and our Coleslaw recipes.  All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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Sea Spaghetti, Ginger and Carrot Salad

I have been looking for seaweeds in my local neighbourhood, and have been surprised at the scarcity and price! The range seems to be dictated by the “superfood” label rather than considering them as ingredients. The range is also limited to Dulse, Nori and Wakame, with nare a piece of kombu in sight (one shop owner even asked me what kombu was!). Sigh. A quick search online finds them at half the store price but the range remains the same in most cases. I found an online shop stocking Seaweed Spaghetti (The Essential Ingredient) and quickly ordered some.

It is a pity that it is not more common, as this recipe, one of Ottolenghi’s in Plenty More, makes great use of Sea Spaghetti. It looks like dark fettuccine and has a similar texture. Perhaps it should be called Sea Fettuccine, to be more precise. If you are keen to try this, but find it is impossible to find Sea Spaghetti, and if you have wakame in the pantry, use that. Or use any seaweed that you have or can find locally. You will just have to prepare it specifically for the type of seaweed, rather than cooking it as described in this recipe.

Similar recipes include Sea Spaghetti, Cucumber and Edamame Salad, Pomelo and Carrot Salad, Mung Bean and Carrot Salad, and Chickpea and Ginger Salad.

Browse all of our Carrot Salads and all of our recipes from Ottolenghi’s Plenty More. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Brussels Sprout and Ginger Slaw

Like many families, Brussels Sprouts never appeared in our kitchen very often. Blame childhood memories of bitter, over-cooked little packages of fear on our plate. Thankfully, we are all wiser now, and our favourite ways of using Brussels Sprouts are raw and roasted.

Today’s salad is a lovely slaw of sprouts and carrots with ginger and chilli, dressed with yoghurt and mayo. How special! But who could create such a recipe, combining all of those flavours? It is of course from Ottolenghi. As much as I rant and  carry on about his recipes, I am truly in love with his flavour combinations and his sheer inventiveness. Good on you, Yotham – continue to challenge our thinking about food and stretch us outside our comfort zone. This recipe is from The Guardian.

It is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – a day per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books and articles – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Check out our collection of Incredible Slaw recipes.

Similar recipes include Brussels Sprouts Baked with Yoghurt, Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pomegranate Molasses, Chopped Salad, Brussels Sprouts Salad, Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pomelo, and Brussels Sprouts Risotto.

Browse all of our Brussels Sprouts recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Swede, Fennel and Tart Apple Salad | Rutabega, Fennel and Tart Apple Salad

Swede – the unloved vegetable on the green grocer’s shelves. We are on a mission to show that this vegetable deserves as much love as other Winter vegetables. Known also as rutabega, a fancy name for sure, it is often mistaken for turnip, but turnip is a completely different beast.

The turnip is sophisticated, while the swede is common and a bit bogan. Turnips are white with purple tops, crisp and slightly bitter. They are perfect eaten raw in salads or as snacks, and are delightful if cooked but still retain some crunch. The swede is pretty unusual in that it’s yellow, less bitter than its sister vegetable, turnip, and some will say that they are sweeter. They have been described as strongly flavoured but today’s swede tastes a little of turnip and a little of apple. They can also be eaten raw in salads, or, more commonly, are cooked.

This is a salad where Swede is used raw and mixed with Fennel and tart Apple. It is a salad that really celebrates winter vegetables. You will love it. I have given you two forms – the first is a crunchy salad, and the second option is to add some yoghurt and pine nuts. Both are great.

Similar recipes include Florentine Fennel with Parmesan, Fennel Salad with Orange Vinaigrette, Fennel and Apple Salad, and Fennel Salad with Fresh Prunes.

Or browse all of our Fennel dishes, and all of our Swede recipes. All of our many Salads are here.  Or explore our collection of Late Winter dishes.

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Celeriac and Tart Apple Salad with Poppy Seed

Sometimes when you are making Ottolenghi dishes, when you are rubbing that vinegar and sugar mixture into the onions or the chilli concoction into the cucumbers, massaging gently, when you are cooking the fourth or fifth element for the recipe, you think this is never going to work, why am I bothering? But then you taste the final dish, and you melt, and the flavours are incredible, and it is totally worth the messy kitchen and the washing up.

This is another Ottolenghi salad that brightens up the day. The king of flavours, Ottolenghi’s taste combinations really are quite extraordinary.

This crispy salad hits you full on with its sharp sweetness and oniony heat, and it’s just what is required to shake up tired tastebuds on a drowsy wintry or early spring night. You will love this one.

Similar dishes include Winter Roast Vegetables with Chickpeas, Fennel and Apple Salad, and Roast Cauliflower, Grape and Cheddar Salad.

You might like to browse other Ottolenghi recipes, or explore other Salads here. We have Apple Salads and Celeriac Salads. Check for all other Celeriac recipes, and take some time to explore all of our Early Spring recipes.

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Red Cabbage Slaw with Barberries

Red cabbage, a colourful addition to a winter kitchen. Here we make a simple slaw with it, flavoured with juniper berries and barberries or cranberries. It is quick and easy, and a gorgeous addition to your Winter table.

The cabbage can be used raw, as in a traditional slaw, or sauteed briefly for a warm slaw.

Similar dishes include Miso Slow Braised Cabbage, Crunchy Root Vegetable Slaw, Grilled Sweetcorn Slaw, and Fancy Pants Coleslaw.

Browse all of our Slaw recipes and all of our many many Salads. Or explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Jicama Salad with Cucumber and Lime | Yam Bean Salad

This is a simple Jicama Salad, easy and quick to make, which matches its crispy apple taste with the Summery freshness of cucumber.  A little heat from chilli and a tang from lime juice, and a gorgeous salad is born.

Jicama, or Yam Bean, is a funny little vegetable, with papery brown skin that can be pulled off in layers. There is nothing there to suggest the beautiful white flesh below which is so crisp, juicy and a little sweet, with a taste hinting at apples. It is versatile, perfect in salads, making wonderful pickles, and can be cooked as well.

Are you looking for other Jicama recipes? Try Jicama and Green Mango Salad, Pickled Jicama, and Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk.

Or perhaps Cucumber recipes? Try Sunday Salad, Cucumber Salad with Japanese Dressing, and Cucumber Yoghurt Salad.

Browse all of our Jicama dishes, our Cucumber recipes, and all of our many many salads. Or take some time to explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Crunchy Root Vegetable Slaw

This is a great Winter salad, a great accompaniment to hot Wintery dishes, and healthy as well. Winter root vegetables are julienned and dressed with a chilli vinaigrette before toasted almonds and poppy seeds are added. There is not much that is more delicious than this. You can make it at other times of the year – I do – but it is harder to find kohlrabi or jicama in Summer.

The recipe is an Ottolenghi one, from his book Plenty More. I received my first Ottolenghi book, Ottolenghi, as a gift after a visit to London, and before Yotham had made an impact in Australia. It was an eye opening book at the time, and it is a measure of the impact of Ottolenghi and his crew that we now take as normal many of the ingredients that Yotham introduced and were harder to find at the time.

In fact, today it is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often slightly massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry.

Check out our collection of Incredible Slaw recipes.

Similar dishes include Chopped Salad, Kohlrabi Creamy Soup, Turnip Salad with Capers, Red Cabbage Slaw with Barberries, Waldorf Salad, Ensalada, and Roast Beetroot Salad with Sweetcorn.

Browse all of our Salads and all of our Ottolenghi dishes. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Grilled Sweetcorn Slaw with Cabbage and Carrot

I read that the average head of sweetcorn has 800 kernels, all lined up in 16 neat rows, and each of those kernels is a seed in its own right. While we eat sweetcorn as a vegetable, it is, technically speaking, a grass, being a variety of maize that is harvested when the ears are immature. As a result, the sugar content in the kernels is much higher than it is in other varieties of maize, which are harvested at a much later stage when they are dry, and eaten as a grain. When you eat the kernels of sweetcorn whole, be that gnawing them off the cob or after shaving off the kernels first, the starch element is retained in each seed, making the dominant experience of eating fresh corn one of tender, juicy sweetness.

Today we are using that beautiful sweet seed of the grass in a slaw with cabbage and carrot. The sweetcorn is grilled first, intensifying the sweetness, before being mixed with a mustard dressing and the slaw ingredients.

This is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area.

In fact, it is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar dishes include Grilled Corn with Miso-Tamarind Mayo, Summer Roll Salad, Red Cabbage Slaw with Barberries, Crunchy Root Vegetable Slaw, Salad with Swiss Cheese and Rye, Sweetcorn and Tomato Salad, and Roasted Sweetcorn and Avocado Salad.

Browse all of our Sweetcorn dishes, our Sweetcorn Salads and all of our Salads. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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