Tomato Tarte Tatin | Tomato Upside Down Tart

A surprising little tarte, intense in flavours, perfect Sunday Lunch or picnic food. Serve with a green salad.

Advertisements

This is an amazing little tart, layered with caramelised onions, oven dried tomatoes and feta. I make it as 4 individual tarts and serve with a green salad and a vegetable salad.

Not only does it taste sensational but it looks simply stunning and unusual.

The taste of the tomatoes is intense, due to the very slow drying of them beforehand. The pie is fragrant with fresh basil, sumac and parsley. Delicious!

Not a fast food, this one. It does take some time to prepare, due primarily to the slow baking of the tomatoes. Best to prepare the tomatoes, pastry and onions the night before and assemble and cook when you need it.

Also try Semi Dried Tomatoes with Pomegranate Molasses, and Halloumi Pizza with Semi Dried Tomatoes.

You might also like our French recipes and other Pies. All of our Tomato recipes are here. Or explore our collection of Late Winter dishes.

This recipe is one of the vegetarian recipes from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006.  Feel free to browse other recipes from our Retro Recipes series.

Continue reading “Tomato Tarte Tatin | Tomato Upside Down Tart”

Olive Oil Bread with Parsley and Dill | A Mediterranean Feast

An aromatic, fragrantly spicy olive oil brioche, ideal for sandwiches.

 

Mediterranean Vegetarian Feasts

I have been looking at the book Mediterranean Vegetarian Feasts, by Aglaia Kremezi. I have had it for ages but have not spent much time with it. It initially presents as a puzzle of a book that, despite having VEGETARIAN in its title, feels free to regularly refer to non-vegetarian accompaniments and optional non-vegetarian additions to the recipes. A more accurate title might be Vegetable Dishes for Mediterranean Feasts.

It is a little thing, but it had delayed my delving into the book in the kitchen. The dishes all look amazing, true, but I was overly conscious that I had thought that I had bought a vegetarian cookbook, and felt somewhat fooled.

Continue reading “Olive Oil Bread with Parsley and Dill | A Mediterranean Feast”

Traditional ANZAC Biscuits

Traditional and delicious, enjoy these ANZAC Biscuits.

On ANZAC day it is traditional to bake ANZAC biscuits. It creates a wonderful memory of childhood days past, of cooking dozens of dozens of biscuits on the old wood stove, of thin crisp crunchy ANZAC Biscuits more often than ANZAC Day comes around. I am a country girl, and these mega baking days were very common in our house when I was a child.

Don’t be fooled, this is a traditional recipe. None of those thick, soft biscuits that try to pass as ANZAC Biscuits can be found in this kitchen. No sultanas, raisins or other dried fruits in sight. Just thin ones that start on the tray as a lump, and gradually spread out and brown up nicely. Yep. Traditional. Just like my Grandmother made. With a cuppa tea, a good yarn and a wood fire.

Unlike many modern versions, particularly those made commercially or made to suit US tastes, this traditional ANZAC biscuit recipe produces flat, chewy biscuits tasting of caramel. Originally, in 1926, the ANZAC biscuits sent to the soldiers on the war fronts didn’t have coconut in them; that was a later addition, perhaps by the 1930s. These flat, chewy biscuits would pack easily and not crumble or break, and so could be transported easily to the soldiers.

Please also have a look at our other crackers and biscuit recipes too.

Continue reading “Traditional ANZAC Biscuits”

How to Make English Crumpets

The perfect Sunday Breakfast.

In the midst of winter the English breakfast treat for any time of the day is the crumpet. But a crumpet is no longer a crumpet. If you buy them from the shops, they are now a thin piece of dough, getting more and more wafer like each year. Do you long for the thick, soft, wonderful crumpet of your youth?

You can make them at home. It is not hard. And with practice you will get a better looking crumpet. But you cannot beat them for taste.

You can also look for Crumpet Flour in your bulk health shop. It is a particularly fine textured flour.

This is the perfect recipe for a late Sunday breakfast. Perfect with peanut butter, with honey or with tomato and melted cheese.

But don’t keep them for breakfast. Eat them with soup, for midnight snacks and with wonderful cheesy baked vegetable dishes.

You might like to also try  Overnight Oats, Porridge, and Stove Top Scones.

Look for other breakfast dishes here. Our English recipes are here. Or be inspired by our Mid Winter recipes.

Continue reading “How to Make English Crumpets”

Pane di Prato | A Tuscan Bread

A wonderful, beautiful flavoured, light textured but very crusty bread.

I so rarely buy bread now. Except for some very special bread I might come across, and of course sourdough. And more recently the Afghan shop nearby has begun making their own flatbread. It’s just that we don’t eat bread much any more. Just occasionally we love to make our own. We don’t do it every week, mind you, although there have been times in my life where I have made bread several times per week – we had a rhythm going, and it was easy a log as we kept to the rhythm. The kids were younger then, and it was a good way to feed their constantly empty stomachs.

Are you looking for other breads? We don’t have many. Try  Olive Oil Bread with Parsley and Dill, No Knead Focaccia, Schiacciata and Rosemary Focaccia. And we have some Toasties – try Pan Fried Toasties with Fontina, Paneer Toasties and Potato and Pea Stuffed Toasted Sandwiches.

But we do have Italian recipes. Try Marinated Zucchini and Tomato, Roasted Pepper Salad with Mozarella and White Beans, and Puy Lentil Soup.

You might also like to explore all of our bread recipes here and here. Or all of our Italian recipes here. Or simply browse our beautiful Mid Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Pane di Prato | A Tuscan Bread”