Tomato Carpaccio with Spring Onion and Ginger Salsa

This beautiful salad is one of Ottolenghi’s simplest dishes. Appropriately, it is from his book Simple. You can make it in just over 5 minutes – perfect for a weekday evening, and spectacular at a weekend BBQ, picnic or lunch.

The quality of the ingredients make this dish, so you’ll need the best tomatoes – preferably home grown ones if possible – as well as the best sherry vinegar you can afford.

The salsa is glorious spooned on all sorts of dishes, from toast topped with mozzarella and/or avocado to lentil salads and pasta dishes. So double or triple the quantities when you make it. It keeps well in the fridge for up to 5 days.

As I mentioned, this is an Ottolenghi dish from Simple – note that we feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area. If you want to check his original recipe, see his books and Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Tomato Salad with Ginger and Lime, Tomato Salad with Parsley Oil, and Tomato and Roasted Lemon Salad.

Browse all of our Tomato Salads, and all of our Ottolenghi dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Two Bean and Two Lime Salad

We have a strange green bean growing – its pod is green with flecks of red. It is delicious, as all green beans are, and perfect for this salad from Ottolenghi. You can of course use any green bean – the beans are paired with either edamame, younger broad beans or even peas. The key to the salad is a beautiful dressing made with lime zest, lime juice, coriander, mint, garlic and chillies! Oh, yes, you just might get excited.

Once the beans are trimmed, it is quite simple to make. Of course it is, it is from Ottolenghi’s book Simple. 10 ingredients, quick and it can be made ahead (see the notes below the salad). Note that I often massage Ottolenghi’s recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar dishes include Summery Grain or Lentil Salad, Sea Spaghetti, Cucumber and Edamame Salad, Italian Green Bean Salad, Green Bean Salad with Asparagus, Spring Salad, and Glorious Green Bean Salad.

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Sweet Potato Mash with Herb and Lime Salsa

Sometimes in Summer when the days are long and frightfully hot we love to eat mezze style – a pile of pitta bread and little dishes of things. Some feta, for example, halved tiny tomatoes with a cream dressing, some hummus, a plate of exquisite chickpeas. And some dips and purees. Today it is a sweet potato mash – this beautiful dish is made from roasted sweet potatoes and is topped with a salsa of lime zest, herbs and garlic. Truly it is divine.

The recipe comes from Ottolenghi’s Simple, and simple it is. Actually tonight I had some left over roasted sweet potato so it came together in not much more than 5 minutes. Yet the flavours of the tart salsa with the sweetness of the vegetable make this a memorable dish. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

The mash or spread works as a snack, mezze dish, starter and as a side. It is hardly any effort at all. The result is rich and punchy. After scooping out the flesh for this dish, save the skins and lightly roast them in the oven for a crisp-like snack. Brush them lightly with olive oil, roast for about 8 mins in a 200 – 220C oven and sprinkle with salt.

Similar dishes include Red Capsicum and Feta Dip, Moroccan Carrot Dip, Walnut and Pomegranate Dip, and Capsicum, Feta and Pistachio Dip.

Why not browse all of our Dips and our Sweet Potato recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Roast Mushrooms with Burrata and Baked Toast Soldiers

Roast Mushrooms -a breakfast of champions. These mushrooms are perfect for the morning meal, for brunch, as a first course later in the day or as a BBQ in the evening. Spiced oil is spooned into large mushrooms which are then roasted before some creamy burrata is placed on the warm mushrooms. I know that you will love this dish, especially if you like egg-free breakfasts.

The idea for this dish comes from Ottolenghi’s Simple. He tosses sliced mushrooms in the oil before roasting them but I have a love of whole roasted mushrooms. The oil mix he uses is pure genius!  As always, I never feel constrained by Ottolenghi’s recipes and will adapt them to what is in our kitchen, pantry and garden. As we do not eat eggs, I make our usual stunning substitution – burrata. Its outer layer has the texture of cooked eggwhite and the inside is soft and creamy.  If you want to check his original recipes, see his books and his Guardian column.

By the way, these mushrooms are great in burgers – pair them with halloumi, grilled zucchini, cos lettuce and onions caramelised with a touch of brown sugar. Add slices of tomato and pickled beetroot if you wish.

Similar recipes include Mushrooms with Barley and Preserved Lemon, Pan Fried Mushrooms in Butter, Roasted Mushrooms with Butternut and Spinach, Mushrooms and Black Rice, and Mushrooms in Terracotta.

Browse all of our Mushroom dishes and recipes using Burrata. Ottolenghi recipes are here – just those from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Zucchini and Sweetcorn Fritters

Sweetcorn fritters! How very delicious. Today we make the fritters with zucchini and sweetcorn. It is an egg-free recipe, as all our fritters are. Easy and quick to make, you’ll love these

The inspiration comes from an Ottolenghi recipe in Simple but we included zucchini and made it egg free. We always feel free to make substitutions to Ottolenghi recipes to make them vegetarian and egg free, and also to suit the ingredients that are available to us. If you want the original recipe, check his books and his Guardian column.

Just a note about using sweetcorn kernels – they will pop (aka explode) if cooked on too high heat. You could pulse the corn a little in a food processor to minimise the chance of this, or keep the heat at the low-medium level.

Similar recipes include Sweetcorn with Black Pepper and Lime, Sweetcorn and Butternut Fritters, Broad Bean Fritters, Chickpea Fries, and Pakora.

Browse all of our Fritters, and all of our Sweetcorn recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Sea Spaghetti, Cucumber, Edamame and Sesame Salad with Tahini Dressing

When I say noodles I suspect you don’t immediately think of sea spaghetti. Yet this member of the seaweed group of ingredients is noodle-like in shape and texture. I have them in the pantry to soak and drape over salads or mix with rice and (real) noodle dishes to add a deep umami flavour. It spreads a deep, saline, addictive flavour throughout a dish.

Sea spaghetti has a similar texture to rice noodles, and with that gloriously salty kick it makes a brilliant accompaniment to other dishes. I bought it online but you might be able to find it at large Asian supermarkets.

I’ve also sprinkled toasted and crumbled dried sea spaghetti over rice and salad dishes, cooked it with real noodles and pasta, cooked it in soups and sauces, stir fried it with vegetables and thrown it into curries. I hear you can deep fry it coated in a light batter or semolina flour. It needs to be cooked right to the point of al dente – even a bit beyond, and I love it with light and fresh ingredients.

The basics of this recipe comes from Ottolenghi’s Simple, a book of simpler flavours and even simpler cooking procedures when compared to his other books. I love this book, along with his others, but after years of cooking from his other books, the recipes  in Simple seem not-quite-Ottolenghi’ish in a nice, humorous sort of way. I took his recipe and added some Japanese seaweed, edamame and noodles to the dish.

Similar recipes include Sea Spaghetti, Ginger and Carrot Salad.

Browse all of our Sea Spaghetti dishes and all of our Seaweed Salads.

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Fresh Mozzarella with Char Grilled Grapes

Italians love to roast grapes, for a concentrated and smoky flavour. They make great additions to Summer meals, picnics and BBQs. It turns out that you can also grill them, and the easiest way to do that is to skewer them! Grill on a ridged grill pan on the stove top or on an Aussie style BBQ.

This lovely recipe pairs the cooked grapes with Burrata or fresh Mozzarella for a fresh, gorgeous Summer lunch, or a pre-dinner starter.  It could also be a Summery salad as part of a outdoor lunch spread or picnic. It is one of Ottolenghi recipes from his latest book Simple. Note that we feel free to substitute ingredients to suit our own cooking styles and what is available in our kitchen, garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

If you can’t get hold of burrata, use buffalo mozzarella instead. That is what I have used today. I have kept to the original recipe when skewering the grapes, but include an alternative method to roast the grapes instead.

But I have to say the char of the grapes, their sweetness, the tart of the marinade and the cheese is a combination made in heaven.

Similar recipes include BBQ’d Grapes, Grain and Grape Salad, and Celery Salad with Burrata.

Browse all of our Burrata recipes and all of our Grape dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking throughPlenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Burrata with Leeks and Za’atar

The sad news regarding ingredient availability near my home is that the new huge supermarket that opened with an amazing array of cheeses has downsized that section to about 1/4 its original size. So cheeses like burrata – I was so excited when they originally stocked it – are no longer part of their inventory. This means it became a luxury item once again and I have to travel into the city if I need it. I adore burrata as a replacement for eggs in dishes where the eggs would be nestled into a base or served on top of, say, a salad.

I cannot complain too much, though. There is an extraordinary range of Asian, SE Asian and Middle Eastern ingredients available in this area, including hot Middle Eastern flatbread straight from the oven. I am blessed!

This is a quick way to get a very comforting meal on the table in a wonderfully short amount of time. It’s a dish as happily eaten for brunch, with coffee, as it is for a light supper with some crusty white bread and a glass of wine. The leeks and spinach can be made a day ahead and kept in the fridge, ready for the burrata and feta.

After a trip to Adelaide’s Central Market and a fresh stock of burrata, I went back to Ottolenghi’s Simple to make his brunch dish of Leeks, Spinach and Za’atar. It is divine – you should try it. I made the usual adjustments, which I share below, but the link will take you to the original recipe.

Similar recipes include Eggplant, Potato and Tomato, Sweet and Sour Leeks with Burrata, Celeriac Hummus with Spiced Cauliflower and Burrata, and Slow Cooked Tomato Chickpeas with Burrata.

Browse all of our Leek recipes and all of our Burrata dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Pea, Za’atar and Feta Fritters

The Pea is there through all the seasons – in its pod in Spring and Summer, frozen year round. It grows up with us, from pea mashes to buttery steamed peas, from to risotto to fritters, and salads to soups. They can seem predictable and are often overlooked. But peas are incredibly versatile. Freshly podded peas are fantastic if they are eaten as soon as possible after picking; the rest of the time frozen will more than do. Peas are the ultimate vegetable, reliable, versatile and almost as good frozen as fresh.

These beautiful fritters are from Simple by Ottolenghi, and they are actually quite simple to make. A pea puree is mixed with za’atar, mint and feta, formed into fritters and fried. They can be served simply with a salad and lemon wedges, or with a yoghurt or cream based sauce for dipping. You can use any yoghurt or cream based sauce – I’ve included a sour cream and mint one below.

When we cook Ottolenghi recipes we feel free to substitute according to what is in our kitchen and pantry. In this recipe we have replaced the eggs with our usual chickpea flour based replacement for fritters – 1 Tblspn chickpea flour + 1 Tblspn cream or yoghurt + 0.25 tspn eno for each egg. We are egg-free in our kitchen. If you want to check the original recipes, you can do so in his books or in his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Spring Onion and Quinoa Cakes, Pea and Mint Croquettes, Stuffed Toasties with Peas and Potatoes, and Green Pea Pilaf.

Browse all of our Pea recipes and all of our Fritters. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking throughPlenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Buckwheat and Broccolini Salad

I happily eat this buckwheat salad as is for a light lunch or snack. You know I love my salad snacks. It is lovely just on its own. Or it is great served with, say, some fritters, herby new potatoes and roasted beetroot. Yum.

This is an excellent dish for the cooler days of Summer and Autumn. The recipe is based on one from Ottolenghi’s Simple. He uses beans in the salad. After the devastating bushfires in Australia, fresh beans are difficult to source. Broccolini makes a great alternative. We cook a lot of Ottolenghi dishes but always feel free to use what is in our pantry, on our kitchen benches, in our garden, or available locally. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Some say buckwheat is an acquired taste. But I think of it as a creamy quinoa, and adore the flavour and texture. You will too. It has a slightly earthy and nutty flavour.

Similar dishes include Butternut with Buckwheat Polenta, Broccolini and Sweet Tahini, and Buckwheat Salad.

Browse all of our Buckwheat recipes and all of our Broccolini dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Simple are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

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