Begun Pora with Bori | Bengali Eggplant Puree with Fried Urad Dumpling Crumbles

Begun Pora is the Bengali rustic cousin of the Punjabi Baingan Bharta, less well known than Baingan Bharta but no less well loved. This has the tastes of Bengal and is totally different in flavour to its cousin. We have already posted one recipe for Begun Pora – but today’s recipe is a different version of that dish.

The idea for this particular dish came from Bengali Cooking: Seasons and Festivals, a wonderful and highly readable book on the amazing food of that state. The author describes how he uses bori in his Begun Pora. What a great idea! It may not be traditional, but it is full of flavour.

Similar recipes include Baingan Tamatar, Urad Dal with Onions Four Ways, Smoky Aubergine with Tahini and Pomegranate, Begun Pora,Β Baingan Bharta and our Wadi recipes.

Are you after Eggplant recipes? Try Algerian Eggplant Salad/Spread, Babaganoush,Β  Saffron and Rose Scented Eggplant, and Japanese Baked Eggplant.

Or perhaps you would like other Bengali dishes. Try Bengali Vegetable Kitchari and Bengali Rice Kheer.

Have a look at all of our Eggplant recipes, and all of our Bengali recipes. Perhaps you want more Indian dishes. Or simply explore our Early Autumn feasts.

Continue reading “Begun Pora with Bori | Bengali Eggplant Puree with Fried Urad Dumpling Crumbles”

Mung Wadi | Mung Vadi | Mangodi | Mung Dal Badis | Dried Mung Dal Nuggets

Indian cuisine has a wealth of sun dried ingredients.

Mmmm, mangodi. I have a fascination at the moment with all things dried in Indian cuisine. Traditionally, the drying is done in the sunshine, but we often don’t have that luxury. However, with a dehydrator we can make dried wadi, vadagam, and other goodies.

Mung Wadi are a type of wadi and are special dried lentil dumplings usually made with mung dal, but other dals (yellow, red, split green or urad dal) can be used. They can be made quite plain (allowing more versatility in the spicing of their final dish) or spices can be added before drying. Like any canvas, they can take quite a range of spices and even some herbs.

On their own, these wadi are not edible, but deep fried, sauteed in a little oil or dry roasted they can be used on their own as a snack; in curries, adding spices and texture; in stirfries, soups and sambars; and in rice dishes etc. Cooked in a sauce, these dry brittle nuggets soak up the flavor and the sauce and becomes spongy and tender. Even crushed, they can be added to salads, sprinkled over the tops of soups or over steamed or BBQ’s vegetables.

You might also like to try Tomato, Eggplant and Potato Subzi with Wadi (Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi), or Masala Mung Wadi – in a Tomato-Garlic Sauce.. Or browse all of our Indian recipes here and here.Β  You might get inspiration from our Spring time recipes here and here.

Continue reading “Mung Wadi | Mung Vadi | Mangodi | Mung Dal Badis | Dried Mung Dal Nuggets”