Griddle Scones

Have you heard of Girdle Scones? (BTW, Girdle is another name for a Griddle.) These scones are perfect for lazy weekends and camping holidays. They can be cooked inside, in or on a BBQ, or over an open camp fire (as long as you can hang or support a griddle).

These scones are delicious eaten warm from the griddle, slathered with butter or spread with jam. They are a lot of fun to make too, and the kids can watch them rise as they cook. Eat them for Breakfast, Snacks or Dessert! They are good at any time.

Similar recipes include Singin’ Hinny, Home Made Crumpets and Bannocks.

And check out all of our Griddle cooking recipes and read an article on Griddles and Griddle cookingAll of our Breakfast recipes are here. Or browse our Late Winter collection of dishes.

This is a vegetarian recipe from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. You can browse other recipes from this blog in our Retro Recipes series.

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Kanda Poha | Onion Poha | Flattened Rice with Onions

Such a delicious snack from Northern India

Poha, a steamed and flattened rice (“steamrolled” I call it) is a great base for Indian snacks. In this poha recipe, it is teamed with onions and peanuts. Kanda Poha goes great mid afternoon with a cup of milky sweet tea (chai). Or it can be a great quick supper dish when you arrive just a little too late home from work. Or, as often done in parts of India, it is a great breakfast dish.

There are several thicknesses of poha – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). This recipe uses medium or thick poha, which you can buy from your Indian grocery. Thick is preferred. Thin poha is not suitable for this dish.

Are you looking for other Poha dishes? Try Poha Chaat, Poha with Potatoes and Peanuts, Kolache Poha, and Poha with Banana, Honey and Coconut.

Browse all of our other Poha recipes and all of our Indian recipes. All of our Snacks are here. Or simply explore our easy Early Winter recipes.

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Baked Figs with Thyme

This morning some eggplants were baking for a planned eggplant and yoghurt dish, and I decided to pop figs into the oven alongside the eggplants, for a great breakfast treat. These are easy – figs, thyme and olive oil. Delicious. Roasting or baking figs intensifies their sweetness. Ten minutes or so and they are ready.

If you are looking for other Fig recipes try these – Roasted Sweet Potato and Fresh Figs, Figs with Rosewater and Almonds, Fig Salad with Almond Butter Dressing, and Figs with Pecorino.

Browse all of our Fig recipes, our Breakfast recipes, all of our Baked recipes, and all of our Dessert recipes. Or take some time to browse our Late Summer dishes.

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Moraiya Kitchari | Barnyard Millet Kitdchari | Sama ki khichdi | Khichuri

Moraiya Kitchari is a delightful dish, healthy and nourishing. It is regularly made for Navratri fasting, Ekadashi fasting or any other time of Hindu fasting as it is an easily digestible dish. It is delicious in its own right – lightly spiced and less vigorous of taste than many Indian dishes, but don’t put it aside because of that. Try it with a wet curry like a yoghurt or besan curry, even a Poritha Kuzhambu! You will enjoy.

Moraiya is composed of tiny, white, round grains. In India, cereal grains are not consumed during fasts. Hence, Moraiya is a popular alternative, especially during Navratri. It is often used in place of rice, although it does not cook into separate grains like long grained rice. It is quite sticky when it is cooked and the grains stick together somewhat.

Are you looking for other Kitchari dishes? Try Moraiya Kitchari with Yoghurt, Sago, Peanuts and Potatoes Kitchari, Maharashtrian Kitchari with Masoor Sprouts, and a Simple Parsi Kitchari.

You might like to check to see whether we have posted other Moraiya recipes. You can browse all of our other Kitchari recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or explore our Early Spring dishes .

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Subudana Kitchari with Potatoes and Peanuts | Sago Khichuri | Sago Pilaf

Remember Kurma? If you are of a certain age, and Australian, you will recall his TV shows of vegetarian Indian cooking. He really was the first to bring Indian food to Australians in a way that made it easily comprehensible and easy to cook. He was a stickler for detail, and for this I love him. So many recipes out of India these days are low in detail, low in precision, and that allows others to take liberties with Indian recipes. Soon, Indian food is no longer Indian food, but some mish mash of regional differences and non-Indian preferences.

One small example. I am constantly frustrated by recipes that say “1 cup rice”. Which rice? Basmati? Short grained? Long grained? Red or white? A South Indian variety? or a North Indian Variety? And it can make a huge difference to the end result. Do you need rice that is harder? Soft? Sticks together? Separates beautifully? Kurma would never leave one in doubt.

We don’t use rice in this recipe, even though it is a kitchari. This recipe from Kurma uses sago. But as usual, Kurma is precise in all details.

Are you interested in other Sago recipes? Try Sago Payasam, and Sago Coconut Payasam.

We have quite a number of Kitchari recipes, for example Maharashtrian Kitchari with Masoor SproutsGujarati Kitchari, Bengali Kitchari and Moraiya Kitchari with Yoghurt.

Feel free to browse all Sago recipes, and all of our Kitchari Recipes. Browse our Indian recipes here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Bondi Bircher Muesli | Bondi Overnight Oats

Muesli is a breakfast and brunch dish of raw rolled oats and other ingredients including grains, fresh or dried fruits, seeds and nuts, and may be mixed with cow’s milk, soy milk, almond milk, other forms of plant milk, yogurt and/or fruit juice. (Thanks, Wikipedia.)

Bircher Muesli was developed around 1900 by Maximilian Bircher-Brenner, a Swiss doctor and nutritionist, for his patients at his Zurich sanatorium as a way of getting more raw fruit into their diets. It is still a very popular breakfast in Switzerland and Germany, as well as many other parts of the world. The original recipe called for a higher ratio of fresh fruit to grain, and soaked the raw oats overnight since they took some time to soften. Each day the patients began their day with this mushy fruity mixture. Perhaps it was not an inspirational dish at the time, but in the past 12 decades, the dish has been refined and is an attractive start to the day.

Bircher Muesli traditionally contains a lot of apples, by way of juice and grated fruit. Bircher-Benner believed apples cured him of jaundice in his youth, and he strongly advocated the healing powers of diets high in fruit and vegetables. Thus originally it had few oats (about 1 Tblspn per person) and lots of fruit.

I guess Bircher Muesli was the original Overnight Oats! Here in Australia it is a perfect Summer breakfast. Fruit is plentiful in Summer – beautiful, perfect peaches, apricots, peacharines, nectarines, berries, plums, …. all and more freely available. This breakfast dish – the Australian version – celebrates our sunshine and Summer.

You must also try Overnight Oats. Other dishes include Shrikand and Besan Payasam, both interesting dishes for breakfast.

Have a look at all of our Breakfast dishes here, or browse our easy Mid Summer recipes.

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A Good Brew – Prunes in Tea with Spices, Mandarin and Lemon

I recently read this characterisation of hot drink imbibers:

Tea drinkers are golden oldies fans. Those who take it from a pot, never from a bag, are classical music snobs. Instant coffee drinkers go for hits from the ’70s and ’80s. Short black aficionados turn into whatever is new and funky. The only people who drink herbal teas are folk singers and old hippies.

That makes me a fan of golden oldies and an old hippie folk singer, yet a lover of the new and funky.

Thank goodness that characterisation is not true today, and along with good espresso coffee, tea has found a rightful place after losing out to coffee for a while. Herbal teas are available in cafes and restaurants, chai is a perfectly acceptable cafe-based low-caffine drink for non-coffee drinkers.

They say tea was discovered in 2737BCE when Chinese Emperor Shen Ning infused dried camellia leaves in water to make a pleasant drink that gave him vigour and focus.

Thank goodness for that. Today we use tea in preparing a dessert or breakfast dish with tea and prunes. You can also browse other breakfast dishes or our deserts here and here. You might also like to check out our tea and chai recipes.

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Chickpea Fingers with Tomato Salsa

Shallow fried chickpea flour bite sized snacks

A really nice snack to have when you are hot or tired or jet lagged, made with chickpea flour. It takes about 30 mins including cooling time.

Chickpea flour, also called besan or gram flour, is an essential ingredient in the kitchen, especially for Indian cooking. It makes a great batter, thickener, thin fritter or pan cake style pudla/cheela, and other goodies. Why not also try Pudla with Green Coriander and Mung Sprouts, Crispy Battered Onion Rings, and Gram Flour Vada. Going Italian, try the wonderful Farinata with Tomatoes and Onion. If it is desserts that you are after, try this Besan Custard.

Feel free to browse all of our Chickpea Flour recipes here and here. Our Salsa recipes are here. Or you might like to browse Snack recipes here and here. Check out our easy Mid Summer Recipes.

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Mushrooms a la Grecque | Mushrooms Cooked with Herbs

Versatile Greek style mushrooms

A quick lunch that does not miss out on flavour. A gorgeous brunch for a Spring day. Or part of a tapas style meal. Or a snack under the grape vines. This recipe even works well with mushrooms that are, well, a little tired and still sitting in the bottom fridge drawer.

Read more about a la Grecque cooking. Feel free to browse our “a la Greque” recipes here and here. Or you might like to browse Mushroom recipes here and here. Check out our easy Spring recipes here and here.

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Strawberries with a Mint Raspberry Sauce

Nigel Slater with a dessert of strawberries and raspberries.

I love Nigel Slater’s Kitchen Diaries II and perhaps it is even better than the first volume. While browsing through the June recipes (ie those suitable for December in Australia), it was his pairing of strawberries and raspberries that grabbed my attention. The festive season is notoriously hot in many parts and it is beach and BBQ weather every day. Berries are prolifically available in Australia at this time, and their gorgeous colours and flavours suit the season well.

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Mung Dal Usli | Muga Dali

Mung dal is a perfect dish – an eat anytime dish but also very good for those sensitive times. Here it is roasted then cooked with coconut for a flavoursome breakfast or side dish.

A dry spicy dish of mung dal is very popular with the people of the mid West Coast of India, for example, Goa and further south into Kerala. It is easy to make and brings the beautiful and gentle taste of mung dal to the fore.

Mung dal is very easily digested and so is a favourite ingredient in Ayurveda and also for invalids. But there is no need to wait until you are on an Ayurvedic regime or are unwell, this is a dish that can be eaten any time. Often served for breakfast, it is also used as a side dish at a Konkani meal. It is also very good as a snack with chapathi too.

You might like to browse our other Mung recipes here and here, and our other Goan recipes here and here. Try other Usili dishes, and sample our Indian recipes here and here.

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Pudla with Green Coriander and Mung Sprouts | Chickpea Flour Fritters

Tangy deliciousness

Those little chickpea flour fritters, pudla, with their tangy deliciousness, are on my menu for breakfasts, brunches and snacks quite often. For example, see the Pudla recipe collection.

You might also like our Chickpea Flour recipes here and here, and our Chickpea recipes. Or you might like to browse Breakfast recipes here and here. Check out our easy Spring recipes here and here.

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Sweet Surnoli Dosa | A Konkani Recipe from Goa

A cousin to Eliappe, the Surnoli is equally as delicious

Talking about Eliappe prompted Moni Bharadwaj (who is the daughter of one of the authors of Festivals of India) to remind me of Surnoli. Surnoli is a Konkani pikelet-like dish made from fermented rice batter in a similar way to Eliappe. How wonderful to have two very similar dishes, from different parts of India.

Surnoli is a Kokani dish from Goa eaten for breakfast or as a tiffin or even for dinner. Yellow in colour, they have a puffy texture with holes due to fermentation, and are eaten with home made butter. They can be sweet (as here) or made without jaggery for a savoury pikelet. When sweet, surnoli  have a porous and soft texture due to the jaggery, and they taste very good.

This dish uses poha, an Indian rolled rice. It is easily obtainable from your Indian shop. There are several different thicknesses of poha – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). There are also poha types made from red rice and brown rice. For this dish, use a white, medium or thick poha for better results.

If you like this recipe you should also try Eliappe and Crumpets. We have other Dosas – try Potato Dosa, Cheela, and Coconut Dosa.

Are you looking for other Poha dishes? Try Poha with Onions (Kanda Poha), Kolache Poha, and Poha with Banana, Honey and Coconut.

Are you looking for other Breakfast dishes? Try Baked Figs with Thyme, Bondi Bircher Muesli, and Rose Yoghurt with Fruits.

Would you like other dishes from Goa? Try Fried Okra, Fiejoada, and Beetroot and Carrot Subzi.

Have a look at our Sweet Dosa recipes. All of our Breakfast dishes are here. You might also like to browse all of our Desserts. Or check out all of our Poha recipes and Dosa recipes. All of our Goan dishes are here. Or simply explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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Lemon Rice | Yelumiccha Pazha Saadham

A tangy and aromatic rice

Lemon Rice is one of the staples of South Indian homes and of Temples for their Prasadam. It is a special rice indeed, with the tang of lemon/lime juice and the crunch of peanuts and lentils fried off in the tadka. You can make lemon rice with freshly cooked rice or with left over rice.

Similar dishes include Sri Lankan Yellow Rice with Yoghurt, Green Mango and Coconut Rice, and Carrot Rice.

Browse all of our rice dishes. Our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. You might like to look for Prasadam recipes too. Or explore our collection of Late Summer recipes.

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Cracked Wheat and Mung Kitchari | Khichuri

A great, different kitchari

Kitchari is generally made with short grained rice and mung dal, cooked until they both collapse into a semi solid dish which is nourishing and tasty. Kitchari has been adopted globally as a healthy, quick dish, easy to digest and compatible with a lot of dietary requirements and fads.

Outside of India, though, recipes vary dramatically from the original. Long grained Basmati is used rather than the more sticky short grain rices like Soma Masouri. This changes the nature of the dish. Soupy and porridge-like consistencies are called Kitchari. And dishes made from other ingredients are labeled Kitchari.

Although the genesis of this dish of cracked wheat and mung dal comes from an approach which was called a Kitchari, it breaks almost every rule for a true, traditional Kitchari. It is more like a savoury gruel, a dal perhaps, or porridge. But as Kitchari literally means “mixture” or “mess”, we will let it pass.

Cook this dish with beautiful, yellow split mung dal – overnight in the slow cooker is ideal, for a warming and nourishing breakfast.

We have a lot of kitchari recipes. You can browse them here. Explore our other rice dishes here and here too. Read our Indian Essentials here, and perhaps browse information on Spices.

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