Zucchini and Halloumi Fritters

I have a thing for fritters. It developed in 2019. My love of them came as a surprise, and arose because:

  1. Ottolenghi has numerous recipes for fritters, and I love Ottolenghi.
  2. I evaluated Hello Fresh for 2 months or so, and they include lots of delicious fritters. (You might have caught my evaluation of Hello Fresh on Twitter.)
  3. I have perfected my egg-replacement for fritters. Use 1 Tblspn chickpea flour, 1 Tblspn cream and 0.25 tspn or less of eno per egg. Add extra chickpea flour if the mixture is too wet. The flour is for binding, the cream for texture and the eno for lightness.

My Sister in Law made these halloumi fritters for a family meal and we made them again for part of the vegetarian component of our Xmas dinner in 2019. Both times they were an absolute hit with vegetarians and non-vegetarians. You will love them and they are so easy to make yet packed with texture and flavour.

The recipe is in Nopi, the cookbook from one of Ottolenghi’s restaurants – the one he had with Scully who has moved on to open his own restaurant. Note that I often massage Ottolenghi’s recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

These are often on Nopi’s breakfast menu, but were also served later in the day as a snack. As popularity grew they made it to the lunch and supper menus as well. You can make smaller ones as a nibble or canap√©. I have had them wrapped in Chinese Moo Shu Pancakes with cucumber and spring onion, topped with a hoisin based sauce. DIVINE.

Similar recipes include Sweetcorn, Spring Onion and Chilli Pancakes, Cauliflower and Cumin Fritters, Aloo Tikki, Sweetcorn and Butternut Fritters, Herb and Walnut Fritters, Spinach Fritters and Pudla.

Browse our growing collection of Fritter recipes and our Halloumi dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Nopi are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Early Summer recipes.

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Sweet Barley with Ginger Poached Rhubarb

We’ve never had barley as a sweet dish before (apart from this mixed grain/lentil congee), so when I saw this Barley Pudding recipe from The Guardian, I was intrigued. It also hit the spot with rhubarb which is shaping up to be the fruit of the season in our kitchen.

I made some adjustments to the original, as is my want. The original used A LOT of sugar, and I cut it by almost a third. That is plenty for our tastes, but feel free to add more if you prefer. Also I used far less water than indicated, and it was enough, but do keep a careful eye on the barley and the rhubarb as they cook, to make sure there is enough liquid.

Similar recipes include Char Grilled Stone Fruit with Scented Yoghurt, Strawberry and Rhubarb Jam, Beetroot and Rhubarb Salad, and Black Pepper Rhubarb with Gin Soaked Cumquats.

Browse all of our Barley recipes and all of our Rhubarb dishes.

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Char-Grilled Summer Stone Fruit with Scented Yoghurt

This is a recipe that epitomises the height of Summer in Australia. Beautiful sun ripened stone fruits, grilled on an Aussie BBQ, and drizzled with a sweet scented yoghurt. It really is the best of recipes for this time, perfect perhaps for an Australia Day BBQ.

It is an Ottolenghi recipe, from his beautiful¬†Plenty More book. We’ve cooked most of the recipes from this book, and have loved them all. In this recipe, Ottolenghi uses Lemon Geranium Water – a Tunisian ingredient that is more difficult to find locally. Orange Blossom Water is a good substitute (as is any other floral water).

We feel free to make substitutes in Ottolenghi’s recipes. See notes below the recipe about the fruit combination that we used. We are lucky enough to have lavender growing in our garden, but if it is not available to you, please omit it. I’ve also used Tulsi and mint leaves today, as sweet basil was not available. Mint is a really nice substitute.

Similar dishes include Blueberries with Bay Custard and Gin. Strawberry and Peach Lassi, Peaches with Asian Flavours, and Watermelon and Peach Salad.

Browse all of our Peach recipes, Fig Recipes and our Desserts. Or browse our Mid Summer dishes.
CONTINUE FOR THE RECIPE

Breakfast Rice and Raisin Porridge

I am not much of a breakfast eater, and in general prefer the savoury options common in Northern and Eastern Europe, and those of India and S.E. Asia, to the sweet and sickly options of the West English speaking countries. Don’t get me wrong, I love a true French croissant with jam, and sometimes pancakes with honey (or sugar and lemon juice). I even have a large container full of my overnight oats mix on standby for mornings when I am super hungry as there is no other cereal in the house. But mostly we either skip the morning meal or prefer something more savoury. Even the overnight oats is unsweetened beyond the dried fruit and dried citrus that it contains.

This breakfast, however, is a little sweet – it has raisins in it – but is rice based, so that is a plus. It is for the days that I do crave some sweetness. Rice is ground to a coarse mix then cooked with the dried fruit. Cinnamon is added to bring a warm sweetness to the dish. You can sweeten it more with your sweetener of choice – I’ve always loved Golden Syrup. It is also great with spiced glazed apples or poached oranges and vanilla ricotta.

Rice porridge is mostly made for breakfast but in this house, it can be eaten at any time of the day. It is a great Winter dessert when your cupboards are bare. Rice and raisins – there isn’t anything more simple. Top with cream and fruit.

This dish can also be made savoury – omit the raisins and cook with Indian spices. Gorgeous. Use spices that you might use for Upma. Top with cashew nuts sauteed in ghee.

You need a high speed blender to make this dish.

Similar recipes include Black Rice with Tomatoes, Breakfast Dishes, and Poached Oranges with Ricotta.

Browse all of our Breakfasts and all of our Rice dishes. Or simply explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Menthe Dose | Methi Dosa | Fenugreek Seeds Dosa

Today we have a soft and porous dosa recipe that is simply made with rice and fenugreek seeds. It is a very easy and comforting dosa recipe that can be served with coconut chutney, tomato chutney, curry leaves chutney or sambar, or with ghee and sugar. I love this dosa with Golden Syrup as well!

By the way, it is a great Summer dish as fenugreek has strong cooling properties.

It is a very healthy dosa, but it comes with a couple of gotcha’s. Firstly, it should be well fermented, or it will be bitter from the fenugreek and hard in texture – it needs a good 12 hours of fermentation at a warm room temperature. It’s the fermentation that moderates the bitterness. The second is to heat the tawa before adding ghee, otherwise the dosa will stick. Best to use a non-stick tawa. And finally, don’t add too much ghee, just enough, otherwise the dosa will still stick.

Similar recipes include Brinjal Dosa Masiyal, Potato Dosa, and Surnoli Dosa.

Browse all of our Dosa recipes and our Breakfast dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here.

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Buckwheat Upma

One of the ubiquitous dishes in South India is Upma, usually made with rava, a semolina product. But it can be made with other grains, like millet, corn, poha, vermicelli and even cracked wheat. Today I am making it with buckwheat as I happened to have it in the cupboard. Buckwheat is particularly good for upma as it cooks to a creamy porridge-like consistency.

Upma is much loved, especially in Tamil Nadu, as a breakfast dish and as a tiffin. But really, it is very easy to make. The grain, usually rava, is cooked in a spice flavoured liquid until the desired consistency is reached. Some like it thin, some thick. Truly it is generally made in under 10 mins, although using buckwheat takes a little longer due to its cooking time.

Similar dishes include Fried Upma, Buckwheat Polenta, and Buckwheat Salad.

Browse all of our Upma recipes, and our Buckwheat dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here.

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Pan Fried Mushrooms in Butter with Garlic

There is nothing better than pan fried mushrooms with garlic, especially if lots of butter is involved. It is a great breakfast dish (think thick slabs of toast topped with the mushrooms dripping with butter), for a side dish, for sandwiches and wraps and as part of tapas, mezze or a grazing plate.

They are so very easy to make and can be done in a jiffy. Any mushrooms or mix of mushrooms can be used – today we used the cute little baby King Oyster mushrooms.

Similar recipes include Mushrooms with Barley and Preserved Lemon, Eggplant, Potato and Tomato, Soba Noodles with Quick Pickled Mushrooms, Mushrooms in Terracotta, and Mushrooms for Toast.

Browse all of our Mushroom recipes and all of our Breakfast dishes. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Eggplant, Potato and Tomato

I love a good brunch, right? Lazy mornings, catching up with friends, relaxed, easy, informal and chatty – untroubled, comfortable being. It’s a long meal that takes up a large chunk of the middle of the day. So very delightful with a touch of indulgence.

This is a lovely brunch dish. The sort that you can centre your brunch spread around. Everything else should come out of the fridge, cupboard or bakery: bread and real butter, home made jams, fresh coffee and full cream milk, fruit juice from the fruit in the trees in the garden, sliced fresh fruit or perhaps baked fruit, a few cheeses (including a blue with bite), overnight oats or bircher muesli, yoghurt and some buttery pastries. This, plus the weekend papers and some good gossip, is all you need to spend half a day in unadulterated bliss.

Of course, it also makes a great supper dish – I might make it on a cold Spring evening. Who doesn’t want something deep fried on a cold night?

There’s a fair bit of preparation involved in this but it is a stunning, unusual dish that you can easily get hooked on. There is also quite a bit of washing up!

This is an Ottolenghi dish of course – it takes a while to make and has 8 or 9 processes. He floats eggs on top of the fried vegetables – I use burrata, bocconcini or buffalo mozzarella. Actually the dish is somewhat similar to Mixed Vegetables with Green Chilli Oil, another dish from Ottolenghi.

This is a recipe from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that we don’t eat (e.g. eggs), and ones that are not readily available in our local area.

If you are keen to reduce the frying in this dish, bake the eggplant until cooked. There won’t be any loss of flavour. You could also bake the slices of potato.

I couldn’t make this dish look nice, but boy, the combination of potato, tahini sauce, eggplant and tomato is so. very. good.

Similar dishes include Sweet and Sour Leeks with Burrata, Slow Cooked Tomato Chickpeas with Burrata, and Purslane Salad with Burrata.

Browse all of our Brunch and Breakfast dishes, and all of our Ottolenghi dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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White Pea and Potato Bhatura | Vatana Bhatura

Have you heard of White Pea Bhatura? Chole Masala is a very popular north Indian dish. White Pea Bhatura is very similar except that it uses vatana or dried white peas in place of the chickpeas. As you can imagine, it is very delicious! Bhatura – oh my, a delicious puffed bread.

White peas are very popular in North India. They are smaller than chickpeas, white in colour and smooth and round. Bhatura is a deep fried puffed bread made from a fermented dough.

Chole Bhatura is often eaten as a breakfast dish, sometimes with lassi. It is also a street food snack and even a complete meal. It is often accompanied by onions, tomatoes, carrot pickle, green chutney and pickles.

This is truly delicious! Even without the Bhatura, but especially with them.

Similar recipes include White Peas Curry, White Peas Sundal, and White Peas, Coconut and Green Mango Sundal.

Browse all of our White Pea recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Winter recipes.

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Banana Porridge with Glazed Apples, Golden Syrup and Passionfruit

Glazed apples are delicious and endlessly versatile. We have made them before, and used them to top porridge. They can also be used to top any pudding, syrupy cakes or endless desserts. Sit atop some junket, for example. Or over icecream, with grilled banana, on top of a fruit salad, topping a bowl of yoghurt. Any way you like.

Bill Grainger in his book Sydney Food has glazed apples with Banana Porridge. We hinted at it in our last recipe.  Today we get more specific about how to make that porridge, with our own twist, of course. It really is delicious, and so Australian!

One of the major changes is that we have added passionfruit. It is a very Australian thing, but also the sour notes of the passionfruit cut through the sweetness of the apples and porridge.

Try these as well – Rice and Raisin Porridge, Baked Apples with Star Anise, Apples with Lemon and Cinnamon, and Apples Baked in Marsala.

Browse our Apple recipes here, our Breakfast dishes and our Desserts too, or find some inspiration in our Late Winter recipes.

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