Cabbage Bondas

Bondas are a popular street food in parts of Indian like Mumbai. Bondas are little round dumplings made from chickpea flour and generally filled with potatoes. They are sold from street carts or footpath stores, and in those little working-men’s canteens that have wonderful, very cheap food.

It is not so hard to make them at home. We were given this recipe for cabbage bondas and they are delicious. They can be made flat into a patty, or round to resemble the potato bondas. We don’t know the source of this recipe – if you know please let us know so that we can update this post.

Similar recipes include Crispy Fried PotatoVadai with Yoghurt, Delicious and Addictive Indian Snacks, and Beetroot Vadai.

Browse all of our Indian Snacks and all of our Cabbage recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Baked Peppers Stuffed with Buttery, Cheesy Vegetables

Fondant is a word that is associated with icing these days. But it comes originally from the French, a cooking term meaning to melt. Fondant Potatoes is the most well known dish where the method of cooking is applied, but it can be used for other vegetables. They are cooked in butter, or in butter and stock, until achingly tender. Sometimes, as is the case with the Fondant Potatoes, an external crispy layer is achieved.

Ottolenghi has a great recipe in Plenty More for capsicums stuffed with fondant swedes.  I was caught short, wanting to make this dish but forgetting to order swedes in the last COVID19 vegetable delivery. So I have twisted and turned his recipe to make it work with what I did have on hand – Kent Pumpkin, Parsnips and Cabbage. Absolutely delicious.

Ottolenghi himself has two versions of this dish. The one in the Guardian column uses gruyere cheese and does not par-cook the capsicums before stuffing. The one in Plenty More uses parmesan and goat’s cheese, and bakes the empty capsicum halves before stuffing and returning to the oven.

Similar recipes include Tomatoes Stuffed with Feta and Basil, Stuffed Okra, and Stuffed Mushrooms.

Or browse all of our Stuffed recipes and Capsicum dishes.

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Minestra con Pasta e Verdure Arriostite | Minestra with Pasta and Roasted Vegetables

We made a lot of minestrone soups this Winter – hearty vegetable soups fortified with dried beans and pasta.  Minestrone is that perfect, soupy blend, often with vegetables. It is a bowlful of goodness that leaves one sated and nourished, and feeling happy and content, at any time of the year.  No one can resist a good minestrone.

In this version, the vegetables are roasted before the soup if made with cannellini beans and vermicelli pasta. It is another incredibly delicious variation on a theme – the vegetables are a seasonal mix so that soup can be made at any time of the year.

We will often make a minestrone on the weekend in Winter – it is so hearty that a bowl of soup, some crusty bread and a simple salad is all that is needed for Wintery Weekend dinners. We are taking our inspiration from Ursula Ferrigno’s books.

Similar dishes include Tiny Pasta in Broth, Geonese Minestrone, Lentil, Barley and Vegetable Soup, and Italian Farmhouse Vegetable Soup.

Browse our Minestrone Soups, all of our Soups and all of our Italian dishes. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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Sri Lankan Stir Fried Cabbage | Gowa Mallum

There is little food waste in the homes of ordinary people in India and Sir Lanka – even the most ordinary ingredient can be turned easily into something extraordinary. Cabbage, for example, is not one of Winter’s favourite vegetables, but when fried with a few spices it is transformed into something to die for.  Check out our Cabbage Thoran and this one too.

This Sri Lankan dish is very similar to a Thoran or Poriyal, with Pandanus added. It is such a common dish (and so easy to prepare) and not surprisingly there are hundreds of variations of the dish – every family will have their own way of making it. Flavoured with onion, mustard seed, fenugreek, chillies, pandan and coconut oil, it is a very easy and tasty dish.

This recipe was given to us – we are always being sent recipes and our friends and family give us ones that they want us to make. We often don’t have the source, so if you know, fill us in so we can include the details.

Similar recipes include Cabbage Kothsu, Carrot Poriyal, and Sweetcorn and Spinach Stir Fry.

Browse all of our Cabbage dishes, our Thorans and all of our Sri Lankan recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Chow Chow Kari with Coconut and Cumin

This is a delicious South Indian Style Curry where Chow Chow (also known as choko or chayote) is cooked along with spices and coconut. It is a simple dish, perfect for a weekday meal.

Chow chow, called choko in Australia, is a funny little vegetable – a prolific bearer and definitely loved by Tamil South Indians who tend to love all gourds. It is slightly bland in taste, with a delicious crispness and an internal juiciness. Divine! It is generally cooked simply – kootu, kari, poriyal or sambar.

A kari is (generally) a vegetable side dish in Tamil Nadu and it is an important part of a balanced meal. Most people believe that the word curry comes from kari although the first term is generic for spicy dishes and the latter is a dish that can be served mild or made exotic with a variety of spices (and deep frying). There are lots of versions of the etymology of kari, but there is some agreement that its modern day usage means stir-fried. Still, you will find lots of different interpretations of it. Stir-fry vegetable dishes can also be called Poriyal and some Sundals are also classified as a kari. Kari can be made with a large variety of vegetables – carrots, beans, snakegourd, chow chow, plantain, Indian broad beans, cluster beans, corn, broccoli, etc.

Similar recipes include Sri Lankan Stir Fried Cabbage, Chow Chow Molagootal, Thani Kootu, and Avial.

Browse all of our Chow Chow recipes, or explore our Early Spring recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Collapsed Beetroot Greens (or any Greens or Cabbage) with Mustard Seeds and Vinegar

One of my online friends calls this technique hypercooked vegetables – long cooking so familiar in the traditional Italian and Greek cuisines. The result is a surprising lusciousness, intensity of flavour, and an almost stickiness. They are deeply flavoured and a little tart. I have made this dish with cabbage and with beetroot greens, but I am sure it would work with any leafy greens that do not collapse immediately on heat (eg most of the salad greens would be unsuitable).

You will find it difficult to stop diving into the cooking pot once these have collapsed down into their jammy texture. But if you do leave some, serve as a side dish, or over rice or any other grain, lentil or bean (freekeh, couscous, white beans, burghul, red rice, etc), turn into a soup with a handful of the one of the tiniest soup pastas, orzo pasta or rice, or just ladle it over thick slices of toast with a drizzle of olive oil. I have also cooked turnips, diced, and added to these beetroot greens. I sometimes add sultanas to counterpoint the tartness.

The mustard seeds and cumin that I added this time are purely optional.

Do try on a lazy Sunday afternoon, when you have time to let the greens collapse and intensify.

Similar recipes include Greek Village Salad, Parsley Braised with Tomatoes and Olive Oil, and Green Beans with Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Beetroot Greens dishes and all of our Greek recipes.

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100 Vegetables: #30 Bring the Cabbage to the Table

Surely we can do better with Cabbage

That cabbage that usually sits at the bottom of the fridge – you’ve made one dish from it and are now wondering what to do with the rest. Nobody ever rates cabbage at the top of the list of their preferred vegetables. So it is inexplicable that cabbage salad is in every salad bar, pizza shop, pub, fish and chip shop and other take away joints. Even supermarkets. Is this just Australia?

Cabbage is most often served as a trestle-table salad for the BBQ. Chipped with unappetising carrots, mixed with a sweet mayonnaise and left to sit too long in the sun, it softens in its own juices.

Such a variety of possibilities

You are wondering about fresh salad ideas, or cooking it so that it is exciting rather than drab and boring cabbage. What about pickles? Snacks? Baking it? Trying Indian Style or Malay Style dishes?

What about red cabbage? Green/white cabbage? Napa cabbage?

Surely we can do better than we do right now. The Germans, for example, know the value of cabbage – sauerkraut must be close to a national dish. Coleslaw comes from the Dutch. Red cabbage is also a favourite of the German people, cooking it with cloves, juniper berries and an apple or two.

The Irish have Colcannon – boiled cabbage mixed with mashed potatoes with plenty of butter and milk, and served with even more butter.

There is more – bubble and squeak. Lebanese Cabbage Rolls, vegetarian style. Rice filled Dolmades using cabbage leaves instead of vine leaves.

We have collected together our favourite Cabbage recipes for you so that life with cabbage is never again boring.

Here are my favourite cabbage recipes.

What are yours? Really, in Australia we can do better than wilted coleslaw.

Browse all of our Cabbage Recipes, and all of our Collections. And check out our 100 Vegetable Series.

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Eat Your Greens! An easy way to include greens each day.

It is fascinating how traditional ways of composing meals have included what we now recognise as health-promoting elements. For example, the salad courses of France and the USA. And yoghurt included in every meal in parts of India. And in parts of Italy it is common to serve a green vegetable on its own as a pre-dinner course or snack.

The Italian greens course is so easy to bring together – simmer or toss some greens, dress, season, serve. It is a great practice – why not try it this month, for the whole month?

Similar recipes include Every Meal some Simple Greens, Steamed Mustard Greens with Mushrooms, and Puree of Greens.

Browse all of our Salad recipes and all of our Spinach dishes. Or simply explore our Early Autumn recipes.

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Peppery Multi Coloured Salad | Kachumber

Chopped salads are so easy to make with a food processor. Simply add the ingredients and pulse until a perfect texture is achieved. This salad is a breeze with the food processor, and can be made in 2 minutes once the vegetables have been peeled.

The recipe is an Indian salad – salads of this sort are not common but also not unusual. They are a spicy take on English food no doubt. In this one we add black pepper and chilli powder to the salad, and it is dressed with lime juice.

You might like to read What is a Kachumber?

Similar recipes include Kachumber, Spring Onion Kachumber, Capsicum Salad with Tomato Dressing, Chopped Salad, Brown Lentils Sundal, Daikon, Carrot and Coconut Salad, and Maharashtrian Cucumber Salad.

Browse all of our Indian Salads, and our Coleslaw recipes.  All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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Miso Slow Braised Cabbage

Four hours to cook a small white cabbage? Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. This works both as a stand-alone starter or as a side for meal. I like it as a deeply flavoured mid afternoon snack too, but then our snacks are usually a little unusual. It is a wintery dish, but don’t let that prevent you from cooking it in the cooler weather of other seasons.

This dish is an Ottolenghi dish, from his Guardian column. First published four years ago, he speaks of it often as an amazing example of the transformation of food during the process of cooking. It is something that always enthralled me, in fact it is the basis of my love of cooking. The way that an ingredient changes from one thing to another as a result of little
more than the application of time and heat, it really is magic. We take it for granted: we sweat an onion in oil, for example, and it changes from something that makes us cry to something that makes us smile with joy at its brilliantly warming sweetness. Each time we throw the acrid, dung-scented spice asafoetida into some oil, it changes to an earthy taste of garlic and onions. We pop mustard seeds in heated oil and they lose their hot intensiveness and become nutty.

And we braise cabbage for 4 hours for this remarkable result. It doesn’t look like a vegetarian dish, in fact it looks quite meaty. But vegetarian it is. It does need a strong dish to accompany it, or something very bland. I have been serving it just with a little plain rice, lemon and soured cream.

Similar recipes include Baked Yoghurt in Vine Leaves, French Braised Lettuce with Broad Beans and Peas, and Pasta Baked with Cabbage and Cheese.

Browse all of our Cabbage dishes, our Braised recipes and all of our Ottolenghi recipes. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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