Coriander, Coconut and Gram Fresh Chutney

A fresh South Indian Chutney made from pureed coconut and coriander.

This is a simple but totally delicious Indian coconut chutney.

There are three varieties of Indian chutneys: fresh chutneys, cooked chutneys, and dry chutneys. Fresh South Indian chutneys are smooth purees made from uncooked ingredients, perhaps seasoned with a tadka of mustard seeds, dal, and curry leaves. They are best freshly made, but they stay good for a couple of days if refrigerated. Made from raw ingredients this type of chutney is unlike most other Indian dishes which have at least some degree of cooking.

Chutneys add zing to a meal and are an essential part of a South Indian meal. They can be prepared with a limitless variety of ingredients. This one is a variation on a Coconut-Coriander Chutney that we shared a while ago. In this one, tamarind is used as the souring agent and some fried gram is added for flavour and thickness. We haven’t added a tadka but you can if you prefer.

Coconut Chutney can be made without herb additions, or, like in this case, coriander can be added, or the same recipe used with mint leaves, garlic, tomatoes, onions, almonds, carrots, beetroot, green mangos, peanuts, capsicums, and greens. Tamarind is added in today’s recipe but it can be omitted or lime juice used.

Similar recipes include Fresh Radish and Mint ChutneyCoriander and Coconut Chutney, and Ginger, Coconut and Yoghurt Chutney.

Browse our Indian Chutneys. Our Coriander dishes are here. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

Continue reading “Coriander, Coconut and Gram Fresh Chutney”

Thosai Sambol | Sri Lankan Coconut and Tamarind Sambol | Coconut and Tamarind Chutney

You can’t help but love this Chutney. It goes well with dosa and dosa-like dishes such as idli, paniyaram and uttapam. It can also accompany any Indian or Sri Lankan meal. A typical Sri Lankan meal will consist of  various curries, rice, roti and several sambols and side condiments, all served together to create a lovely layered blend of tastes. In many ways Sri Lankan Tamils took the Tamil Nadu cuisine and made it their own.

This sambol is coconut-y for sure, with a little heat, gingery and some sourness from the tamarind. It is divine!

Are you looking for chutneys and sambols? Try Mint Sambol, Carrot Sambol – a Jaffna-Style Salad, Red Radish Chutney, and Coriander and Coconut Fresh Chutney.

Or do you want Sri Lankan dishes? Have a look at Mung Dal with Coconut Milk | Sri Lankan Style, Red Radish Chutney, and Fenugreek Kuzhambu.

You can find some more Indian Chutney recipes here, and other Sri Lankan dishes here. Browse other Coconut recipes. All of our Indian dishes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take time out to explore all of our easy Mid Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Thosai Sambol | Sri Lankan Coconut and Tamarind Sambol | Coconut and Tamarind Chutney”

Coriander and Coconut Fresh Chutney

A fresh South Indian Chutney made from pureed coconut and coriander.

This is a simple Indian chutney. There are three varieties of chutney: fresh chutneys, cooked chutneys, and dry chutneys. Fresh South Indian chutneys are smooth purees made from uncooked ingredients, perhaps seasoned with a tadka of mustard seeds, dal, and curry leaves. They are best freshly made, but they stay good for a couple of days if refrigerated. Made from raw ingredients this type of chutney is unlike most other dishes which have at least some degree of cooking.

Chutneys add zing to a meal and are an essential part of a South Indian meal time. They can be prepared with a limitless variety of ingredients.

Similar recipes include Fresh Radish and Mint ChutneyCoriander and Coconut Chutney, and Ginger, Coconut and Yoghurt Chutney.

Are you looking for chutneys? There are a range of Eastern and Western Chutneys here. Browse our Coriander dishes here. Or explore Indian recipes here.

Continue reading “Coriander and Coconut Fresh Chutney”