Creme Fraiche Icecream | Egg Free

I once did an icecream making course with a renown chef in Adelaide, Mary Ziukelis, who specialised in icecreams and sorbets in her restaurant Neddy’s. This was a ground-breaking restaurant in Adelaide in the 1970’s and ’80’s, opened by Cheong Liew and Mary. It changed hands several times over the years, but was always ahead of its time. Some people will remember the restaurant and the female chef with an icecream obsession. Mary had some great tips, like always use glucose syrup, not (just) sugar. Truly, it makes a difference. Let me know if you remember the chef with a passion for icecream at Neddy’s Restaurant. She was brilliant.

This is an icecream recipe I have had for years, and it might be one of hers. It is quite divine. My note on the recipe reads Just make, eat and die. I think that sums it up. It is not as overwhelmingly hard when it freezes, as many egg-free icecreams can be.

You won’t find yourself eating large serves of this icecream – a couple of large spoonfuls is usually enough at a time. This is probably a good thing once you consider the amount of sugar that is used in icecreams! But in a heatwave you will find yourself having some with each meal. The tang of the lemon against the smoothness of the cheese is divinely wonderful.

If you are extra keen you can even make your own Creme Fraiche to use in the icecream.

Similar recipes include Strawberry and Black Pepper Icecream, Roasted Plum Icecream, and Strawberry Frappe.

This recipe is one of the vegetarian recipes from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. You can see more of the Retro Recipes series, our vegetarian recipes from that first blog.

Browse all of our icecreams, or browse our Late Summer dishes.

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Sweet Potato Wedges with Lemon Grass Creme Fraiche

Another Ottolenghi Classic.

One of our xmas lunch dishes came straight from Yotham Ottolenghi. Let’s be clear – most years we cook at least one dish from Yotham’s repertoire. Last year it was Potato Tartin. This year it was sweet potato wedges. They are surprisingly good.

The creme fraiche dressing was a bit heavy, I thought. Next time I might replace the creme fraiche with some thick yoghurt. Otherwise, the recipe was cooked mostly as detailed in Yotham’s book Plenty.

Have you also tried Potato and Sweet Potato Vindaloo or Madras Curry with Sweet Potato, Eggplant and Spinach? Also try Chilli Soy Sauce.

Browse all of Ottolenghi dishes here, and all of our Sweet Potato recipes here.

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Baked Apples – 2 Ways

Oh cold weather speaks of Baked Apples, such comforting food, especially when cooked with a little Marsala.

Oh cold weather speaks of Baked Apples, such comforting food, especially when cooked with a little Marsala.

Feel free to browse recipes from our Retro Recipes series. You might also like our Salad recipes here. Or you might like to browse Apple Recipes here. Check out our easy Autumn recipes here.

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How to Make Creme Fraiche | Katte Malai

If there is a secret to French Cooking, it is to be found in crème fraîche. Never be without it.  I make my own regularly at home for those times when we eat more desserts – winter for baked dishes, summer for fresh fruit. It is a wonderful alternative to either cream (adding a little amount of soureness) and more flavoursome than sour cream.

Crème Fraîche is a heavy cream slightly soured with bacterial culture, but not as sour or as thick as sour cream. Originally a French product, today it is produced by a process similar to that of sour cream, with the exception that no ingredients are added.  Crème Fraîche can be made at home by adding a small amount of cultured buttermilk or sour cream to normal heavy cream, and allowing it to stand for several hours at room temperature as the bacterial cultures act on the cream. It has several advantages in the kitchen. Unlike sour cream, crème fraîche can be mixed with air to form whipped cream, and it can be cooked without curdling.

Never substitute sour cream for crème fraîche in any recipe; sour cream has a butterfat content of 10 to 18 percent, which is not enough to stop it from curdling when added to hot foods. Thickened cream has 30 to 37 percent, and can be substituted for crème fraîche, but it lacks the sour taste.

In the North of India a similar product is made, called Khatte Malai. Often made with buffalo milk, the cow’s milk version is milder in taste. And the best ghee is made from cultured cream such as crème fraîche.

Try these recipes using  Crème Fraîche:  Sweet Potatoes with Crème Fraîche and Crème Fraîche  Icecream.

You might also like to browse all our Creme Fraiche recipes here, and our How To recipes too. Our French recipes are here. Or check out our easy Late Summer recipes.

This recipe is one of the vegetarian recipes from our first blog which was in existence from 1995 – 2006. You can find more of these recipes in our Retro Recipes series.

Continue reading “How to Make Creme Fraiche | Katte Malai”