Easy Cumquat Marmalade

Beautiful cumquats make beautiful jam, and so it is to the stove top that we turn this morning. Some cherry tomatoes are drying in the oven, taking the chill off of the kitchen, and we chop, soak and simmer cumquats before turning them into the most delicious marmalade. Breakfasts are going to be amazing this month!

This jam is also an exceptional accompaniment to hot Indian curries. The sweetness tempers the heat of the dish, and the cumquat tartness is beautiful with the spices.

Similar recipes include Cumquats in Gin, Cumquats Pickle, Cumquat Olive Oil, and Cumquat Vanilla Marmalade.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes, and our other Jam recipes. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Curry Roasted Carrots (and Other Root Vegetables) with Curry Leaves, Lime Leaves and Tart Citrus Juice

Recently I popped into the Adelaide Central Market and came home with bags full of goodies, including some colourful heirloom carrots. Half of them went into a Honey Roasted Carrot dish, and the rest were thrown into the oven with curry leaves and shredded lime leaves with Cumquat Juice (or lime juice can be used), and some curry powder as well. Its a lovely dish, perfect for this Autumn weather. It is still warm so we are still eating outside when we can. This dish looks perfect on our outside table.

It is another Ottolenghi dish – we have a focus on his dishes this year, so we turn to his books whenever we can. But we mix his recipes up whenever we can to make use of what we have in the kitchen. In his book, Plenty More, Ottolenghi uses swedes, parsnips and carrots in this dish, but I have used only carrots – lovely young heirloom carrots. Spring onions are added later in the cooking, and their fresh greenness adds a beautiful element to the dish.

So, it is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking primarily from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. As I said, I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Golden Brown Carrots with Garlic, Honey Roasted Carrots with Citrus Juice and Yoghurt, South Indian Carrot Soup, and Hot Roasted Carrot Salad.

Browse all of our Carrot recipes and all of our Roasted dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Fennel and Quinoa Salad with Broad Beans

Time to get back to Quinoa – we cook with rice, bulgar, barley, lentils, beans, …., but Quinoa doesn’t often feature at our table. This salad helps to rebalance that dynamic.

It is a wonderful Wintery dish using fennel. It is the sort of dish that can form a lovely lunch or supper on a cold day. I always miss fennel in the Summer, and when it appears in shops again in late Autumn our excitement is evident.

The fennel is paired with Fava Beans (Broad Beans). Use fresh ones in the beginning of Spring when fennel is still available, or use frozen ones in Autumn and Winter. The best frozen Broad Beans are found in Middle Eastern shops – they are already peeled! Such a time saver. The fennel and beans are mixed with quinoa, spices and herbs. Don’t hold back on the black pepper, it really enhances this dish.

The recipe is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area.

It is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Quinoa Salad with Orange, Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes, Parsley and Pinenuts, Rice, Wild Rice and Quinoa Salad, Quinoa Porridge with Tomatoes and Herb Oil, Red Rice and Quinoa with Orange and Pistachios, Quinoa, Parsley and Lemon Salad, and Fennel Salad with Orange Vinaigrette.

Browse our Fennel recipes and all of our Quinoa dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Fennel and Quinoa Salad with Broad Beans”

Citrusy Beetroot with Puy Lentils

I enjoy living where I do, out in the boondock suburbs of my city, because it is so countrified. AND because of the bountiful and cheap produce of (nearly) all varieties here. When you live in an area with a fair percentage of migrants who love food – Indian, Nepali, S.E. Asian, Middle Eastern and various African people – then food is always going to be at the forefront of any shopping precinct.

But there are certain things that I can’t lay my hands on here. Good cheeses. Really good olive oils. Some lentils not common to those cuisines, like Puy and Beluga lentils. And definitely not Yuzu.

I have solved much of this problem with a 4 – 6 weekly trip into the Central Market, the main area of providore type shops in our city, stocking up on all sorts of things, and grabbing artisan bread, fresh cheeses, vanilla beans, horseradish root, organic vegetables and other not-to-be-seen-locally items that feel like a huge treat. But it also reminds me to be so grateful of where I live when I see tiny tomatoes selling for $9/kg inn the Market and I can get them nearby my home for $2/kg. Oh the great socio-economic divide!

So today’s recipe has its origins in one from Ottolenghi (in Plenty More), but Yuzu, a central ingredient in his recipe, is not to be found either locally or in the Central Market. So I have tinkered with it quite a bit, substituting cumquat juice and rind (as I have cumquats in my new garden — and they are readily available in the local Asian grocery), and lime juice. Use all lime if you can’t source cumquats. I also change out the greens. Ottolenghi loves to use baby spinach and rocket but I prefer to use leaves of herbs and vegetables growing in the garden, including peppery and bitter ones like nasturtium, moringa leaves, purslane and watercress.  Use soft herbs and leaves or substitute with the spinach and rocket, whatever is more convenient for you.

The salad uses beetroot simmered until tender then cut into wedges, along with raw beetroot sliced absolutely paper thin. I have to thank a new food processor for the paper thin slices – I was over the moon when I saw the result. Mandolins are also good for thin vegetable slices – I’ve been using mine for 25 years or so, and it is less washing up than a food processor!

By the way, I froze the horseradish from the market (after making Crushed New Potato with Yoghurt and Horseradish), and really can’t wait to make today’s recipe again with horseradish rather than citrus. Imagine!

It is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Beetroot and Rhubarb Salad, Puy Lentils with Ragout of Mushrooms, Roasted Beetroot with Maple Dressing, Beetroot Salsa with Yoghurt, and Beetroot in a Herb Dressing.

Browse our Beetroot Salads, and indeed, all of our Beetroot recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Citrusy Beetroot with Puy Lentils”

Honey Roasted Carrots with Cumquat Juice and Yoghurt Sauce

I popped into the Adelaide Central Market this morning, leaving home at 6:30am for a quick trip (no traffic!) of 30 mins, wanting to pick up some lentil varieties that I can’t get locally. And of course I came home with a couple of very large shopping bags full of produce. The food budget for this week is totally blown, but it is worth it. The Market is such a special place, loved by all Adelaidians.

I grabbed a bunch of heirloom carrots while I was there, and decided to honey roast them. They are drizzled with honey and tossed in olive oil, spices and herbs and roasted till tender. I love to serve them with a squeeze of citrus – today it is cumquat juice as they are ripe on the tree in the garden – and a pot of yoghurt. The yoghurt can either be plain, which is gorgeous, or a yoghurt-tahini sauce like this one pairs with the carrots perfectly.

The genesis of this dish is a recipe from Ottolenghi’s Plenty More. The one I share has been altered just a little. For once, it is an easy recipe from Ottolenghi, and one that you can vary according to your seasonal produce (try cooking parsnips this way, they are amazing!). We have a project in our kitchen – one of several – that has us cooking each week from Plenty More and we hope to cook our way through the book this year.

So, it is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking primarily from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

The recipe is very similar to one from Arthur Street KitchenHoney Roasted Carrots with Spices. Which one came first? Never mind, it is very delicious.

Similar recipes include Golden Brown Carrots with Garlic, Curry Roasted Carrots with Curry Leaves, Lime Leaves and Tart Citrus Juice, Leeks and Carrots a la Grecque, Carrots Glazed with Cumin and Ginger, and Baked Carrot and Mung Bean Salad.

Browse all of our Carrot recipes and all of our Roasted dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Honey Roasted Carrots with Cumquat Juice and Yoghurt Sauce”

Artichoke Hearts with Mozzarella and Candied Citrus

Artichokes are not something that appear in our kitchen, ever. But they are used by Ottolenghi quite regularly in his recipes, so the hearts from the deli section have made an appearance. Recently we found a large jar of the best artichoke hearts, reasonably priced, in a crazy Vietnamese-Eastern European shop close by to my home. Fresh artichokes are still waiting to be braved – we can’t yet see the value-add for the work and price involved, to be frank.

This lovely recipe, from Plenty More, is one of Ottolenghi’s easiest if you use hearts or bases rather than fresh artichokes, and forgo candying the lemon rind. Then it takes just a few minutes to put the salad together. It is fresh and delicious. Frozen, jarred or deli-section hearts or bases can be used.

But we mixed it up (of course). The mozzarella we used is smoked. And we candied the peel and segments of cumquats from our cumquat tree using palm sugar. The result is dark peel and syrup but oh so very delicious. It takes about 15 mins to candy citrus peel, and it is worth doing for this salad. The sweetness contrasts well with the artichokes.

It is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar dishes include Tomato and Lettuce Salad with Pickles and Croutons, Salad with Swiss Cheese and Rye, The Little Italy Salad, Artichoke and Potato Salad with Preserved Lemon Mayonnaise, Tomato and Lettuce Salad with Lemon, Mograbieh and Artichoke Pilaf, and Artichoke Hearts and Feta Salad with Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Artichoke recipes and our Mozzarella dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Artichoke Hearts with Mozzarella and Candied Citrus”

Cumquat Rasam | Kumquat Rasam | Sweet, Sour, Hot, Delicious

Rasam, that tangy, spicy, soup-like liquid of South India, is commonly made from lemons, limes and oranges, so, with a surfeit of cumquats in the kitchen, we made a delicious Cumquat Rasam to eat over rice.

You may be wondering what a Rasam is. It is a soup-like dish which can be thick or thin, and is usually eaten as part of a meal and served with rice – read more about Rasam here.

Similar recipes include Kottu Rasam, Pepper Rasam, Lemon Rasam, and and Tomato Rasam. Also try Easy Cumquat Marmalade.

I’ve been discussing the spelling of Cumquat with others. In many places it is spelled Kumquat, but the British (and Australian) spelling is Cumquat. Surprisingly, in India, which has followed the British spellings in other things, has chosen Kumquat. But actually, neither spelling is correct. The name derives from the Cantonese gām-gwāt 金橘, literally meaning golden orange or golden tangerine. Our transliteration of the Cantonese, with the g sound so close to the k sound, had become C(K)umquat. There are parts of the world that call them Chinese Orange – so much simpler.

Cumquat recipes include Cumquat Tea, Cumquat Rice, and Cumquat Chutney.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes, and our Cumquat recipes. Explore our Indian dishes, and our Indian Essentials too. Or check out our delicious Late Winter dishes.

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Cumquat Tea | Kumquat Tea

The season of cumquats are upon us, and not only are we able to get gorgeous ones from our local Asian Grocery, but friends who are not so kitchen-friendly as me, arrive with baskets of them.

For many years we have made our beautiful go-to cumquat recipes. Marmalade, Chutney, Pickles, Oils, and Soaked in Gin.

But a conversation with a Fijian friend changed, or rather, expanded, the way we think about this tiny, semi-sour globular fruits. He related how they use cumquats like lemons, squeezing the juice into dishes that need that bit of tang. Now not only are they squeezed, we cut them in halves and nestle them into oven baked dishes, they are floated in stocks, soups and stews to infuse, we char grill them for salads, and they find their way, chopped into 2 or 4 or 6, into warm vegetable mixes.

And they are made into tea.

What a delicious infusion this is. Just cumquats, or with mint and/or other herbs added, it is a perfect mid morning or mid afternoon pick-me-up. Surprising. Wonderful.

In terms of herbs, use your favourites, and don’t be afraid to experiment with a leaf here and there. Tulsi, basil, mint, thyme, parsley. Add honey if you need a sweetener. I don’t. But some Cumquat varieties are more sour than others.

We have some similar teas for you to try – Longan and Young Ginger Tea, Rosebud and Borage Flower Tea, and Mint and Lemon Verbena Tea.

Are you looking for other Cumquat recipes? Try Cumquat Rice, Steamed Thai Eggplant with Cumquat, and Cumquat and Pea Shoot Salad.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes, and all of our Teas. Or take some time to explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Cumquat Olive Oil and Cumquat Butter

Use your left over cumquats to make this exquisite salad oil.

A bag of exquisite cumquats lasted and lasted, being turned into everything that I could think of. They were a joy. Sometimes we pick our own from trees on public land around the city (but more and more these are disappearing). Sometimes friends ply us with their harvest when they have no idea what to do with them. I feel compelled to make as many things as I can with them just to prove that there is more to cumquats than Cumquat Jam. I make teas with them, dehydrate some, place them in the pan as vegetables bake or cook a la grecque. They are used in place of lemons, squeezing a dozen into a soup or sambar or dal. I love these little bright orange balls.

Are you looking for Cumquat recipes? Try Easy Cumquat Marmalade, Cumquat Olive Oil, Cumquat Chutney, and Easy Pickled Cumquats.

We have more Cumquat recipes, so browse our collection.  Or you might like to browse Olive Oil recipes and look through our recipes for preserves. Our favourite is Cumquats in Gin. Find inspiration in our gorgeous Early Spring recipes.

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Cumquats Rice

A delicious variation on Indian style flavoured rice.

To everyone alone today, I say hello! Enjoy your time of luxury, either at the beach if you are in this part of the world or snuggled up with books and movies if you are not.

Needing a quick bite yesterday, I turned to my fav style of one pot rice. One Pot dishes are wonderful for suppers, a quick meal, or those evenings alone with a good book, some good music and maybe a movie on TV. Not a lot of preparation and best of all, not a lot of washing up.

Feel free to browse our rice recipes here and here. Or you might like to browse Indian recipes here and here. Check out our easy Spring recipes here and here. And our Cumquat Recipes are here and here.

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