100 Vegetables (and Fruits): #78. Green Mango

Green Mangoes are a real gift, and available from Asian groceries almost year round. It is amazing to track the different varieties across the year, many of them unlabelled. In the market today, one variety was labelled Crunchy Green Mango. I loved the images that it conjured up.

Green mangoes are refreshing and tart. Some are sour-tart, and others are sweet-tart. They are particularly good in salads and surprisingly good in dals and with yoghurt sauces. I have included a particularly delicious drink in this collection – one where the green mango is roasted or boiled then mashed with spices to make a cooling and refreshing summer drink.

You can browse all of our Green Mango recipes. And check out our 100 Vegetable Series.

Continue reading “100 Vegetables (and Fruits): #78. Green Mango”

100 Vegetables: #58. Delicious Tangy Green Mango

Green Mangoes are a real gift, and available from Asian groceries almost year round. It is amazing to track the different varieties across the year, many of them unlabelled. In the market today, one variety was labelled Crunchy Green Mango. I loved the images that it conjured up.

Green mangoes are refreshing and tart. Some are sour-tart, and others are sweet-tart. They are particularly good in salads and surprisingly good in dals and with yoghurt sauces. I have included a particularly delicious drink in this collection – one where the green mango is roasted or boiled then mashed with spices to make a cooling and refreshing summer drink.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Green Mango Recipes, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “100 Vegetables: #58. Delicious Tangy Green Mango”

Green Mango Pachadi | Maangai Pachadi

What is a pachadi? For many people, it is equivalent to a raita, and indeed there are curd or yoghurt based pachadi dishes that have similarities with the raitas of the North of India. It is these dishes that are most well known throughout India. Even Wikipedia thinks these are the only curd based pachadis in some regions like Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.

But my goodness, there are quite a few variations of Pachadi, from the ground vegetable and green ones of Andhra Pradesh, to the mashed vegetables of the South, to ones that contain cooked vegetables or fruits in a white, non-dairy sauce, to the sweet pachadis of Kerala (also without yoghurt). They take the form of side dishes, salads, pickles or chutneys.

Meaning of Pachadi

Pachadi means pounded and in many pachadi dishes the ingredients are either ground, minced, mashed or diced and cooked according to the custom of that region.

Meenakshi Ammal

Today’s recipe, one of Meenakshi Ammal’s, uses a sweet-sour mango which is cooked in a slightly sweet, almost unspiced sauce and topped with chillies and mustard seed. It is a typical non-yoghurt pachadi from Tamil Nadu – perhaps less popular today than 50 years ago but still part of Tamil cuisine. We love to cook from Ammal’s Cook and See, and you can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made so far here.

You can imagine that this style of dish perhaps even preceded the yoghurt based dishes, or perhaps were made as an alternative when yoghurt was not available. Or perhaps it is just made to vary the daily routine.

Festival Recipe

In Madurai, this Mango Pachadi is made on Tamil New Years Day in April, with fried Neem Flower Powder added at the end of cooking.

Other Recipes

Similar dishes include Dried Mango Pachadi, Madhura Pachadi, Milky Brinjal Pachadi, and Green Mango with Coconut Milk. Read more about types of Pachadi here.

Browse all of our Pachadi dishes and all of our Green Mango recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn collection.

Continue reading “Green Mango Pachadi | Maangai Pachadi”

Quick Mango and Ginger Achar | Green Mango and Ginger Pickle

Pickles are an essential part of Indian life, and such is the love for them that people wax lyrical about the tastes and variety. And this subsection of the Indian cuisine is worthy of the praise. There is nothing that is equivalent outside of India.

Pickle making is usually a family affair, with the rooftops crowded with ingredients drying and pickle jars fermenting. But occasionally, one needs a quick pickle, a fresh one, one for an afternoon snack of roti or rice.

Green mango is perfect for this pickle, but alternatives exist. See the notes below the recipe.

Similar recipes include Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Pickle with Oil, Fresh Green Apple Pickle, Quince Pickle, and Mustardy Carrot Pickle.

Browse all of our Indian Pickles and all of our Pickles. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Quick Mango and Ginger Achar | Green Mango and Ginger Pickle”

Green Mango Rice | Mamidikaya Pulihora

India must be the country that has the most appreciation of rice. It boasts thousands of different rice varieties and many many more dishes that feature rice as the main ingredient. Rice is never ever relegated to a side dish, playing second fiddle to the main dish or dishes of the meal. There it is, front and centre, always. Pulaos, Kitcheri, Biryani, Bhats, Pongal and Mixed Rices are examples of well known rice dishes.

Pulihora is a South Indian rice which is usually made with tamarind. But the same dish can also be made with green mango or with lemon juice as the souring agent. It is a rice dish that plays homage to the love of sour tastes in Tamil Nadu and beyond. In this recipe, the tamarind is replaced with green mango, and some carrot adds a sweet counterbalance and colour.

This dish is also called mangai sadam and mavinakayi chitranna in different regions. The recipes vary a little, e.g. coconut might be added, but the  base is essentially the same. In South India mango pulihora is made during certain auspicious occasions and festivals too.

Similar dishes include Green Mango Pachadi, Jeera Rice (Cumin Rice), Red Rice in Tomato Juice, 30 Indian Dishes for Mid Summer, Saffron RiceSaffron, Date and Almond Rice, Ghee Rice with Pandanus, and Green Mango and Coconut Rice.

Browse all of our Mixed Rice dishes, all of our Rice dishes, and Green Mango Recipes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and the Indian Essentials Series is here. Or explore our Early Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Green Mango Rice | Mamidikaya Pulihora”

Green Mango Pickle | Mango Aavakaaya

One of my first tastes of India, smack in the middle of South India, was of a pickle that was hot, sour, salty, all at once. I grew addicted to that taste. While most non-Indian people love the Sweet Mango Pickle, I am a devotee of Green Mango Pickle.

This recipe is fairly easy to make if you can get your hands on hard, green mangoes – make sure that they are really green, and not a half ripe sweet mango.

Mustard seeds – whole or ground – are a feature of many Indian pickles. Not only do they taste good, adding a pungency, they are anti-microbial so certainly help in pickles and other preserves.

Similar recipes include Pickled Watermelon Rind, Lime Pickle without Oil, Green Mango Pachadi, Quick Mango and Ginger Aachar, Indian Fresh Green Apple Pickle, Mustardy Carrot Pickle, and Onion Strings Pickled Salad.

Browse our Indian Pickles, and all of our Pickles. All of our Indian recipes are here, and the Indian Essentials Series is here. Or explore our Early Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Green Mango Pickle | Mango Aavakaaya”

Aviyal | Avial | Vegetables in a Coconut and Yoghurt Sauce

It is interesting to compare the Madhur Jaffrey version of Kerala’s Aviyal (delicious) with this traditional Tamil version from Meenakshi Ammal (also delicious). Madhur Jaffrey wrote for Western audiences, and used commonly available ingredients and vegetables, while Meenakshi Ammal wrote for Indian wives using locally available produce. There will also be regional differences. The first thing I noticed is that Ammal specifically excludes okra from the recipe list, while Jaffrey includes it. (I did put a few in this time, I quite enjoy them.)

The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes.You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Avial can be made with a liquid sauce of coconut and yoghurt, or the sauce can remain thick and just coats the vegetables. It is generally eaten with rice.

The word aviyal (aka avial) is also used to denote ‘boiled’ or ‘cooked in water’ —this sense being derived from the way the dish is made. They say that the origins of this recipe is from the Nambudiri cuisine but it is now common throughout South India.

Similar recipes include Chow Chow Kari, Kerala Aviyal, Pulissery, and Pineapple Pulissery.

Browse all of our Aviyal dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Aviyal | Avial | Vegetables in a Coconut and Yoghurt Sauce”

Cucumber, Carrot and Green Mango Koshambari

Koshambari Salads are perfect Summer “round out the meal” salads as they contain both cooling vegetables and lentils for protein. So often the advice given to vegetarians is written by non-vegetarians and therefore includes only vegetable-based dishes without lentils, grains, soy products, nuts, seeds and so forth, in sufficient proportions for a balanced vegetarian diet.

The great thing about traditional Indian vegetarian cuisines is that they are naturally balanced in all sorts of ways – nutritionally, texturally, flavour-wise, ayurvedically, …. Forget the current Western style fashions in India, like the addiction to Oreo biscuits and too much street food (how can I criticise either of these!), the combinations of grains, lentils, paneer and vegetables is naturally balanced.

Koshambari is the perfect Summer salad, with cooling ingredients and the surprising inclusion of soaked but raw lentils, either chana dal or mung dal. Today we use chana dal with carrots, cucumber and green mango. Delicious. While raw foods are not common in India, the occasional Kosumalli makes an appearance. Raw food is not sanctioned by Ayurveda – so there are versions of this salad that lightly saute the ingredients. You can do this too, should you desire.

We have compiled 30 Great Mid Summer Salads for you, so it is very easy to vary your salads each day.

Similar recipes include Horse Gram Salad with Feta and TomatoesGreen Mango Rice, Sweet and Sour Cucumber Salad, Carrot Koshambari, Cucumber and Mung Kosumalli, and Daikon Salad with Coconut and Nigella Seed.

Browse all of our Koshambari recipes and Indian Salads. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Cucumber, Carrot and Green Mango Koshambari”

Ambe Dal | Ambyachi Dal | Green Mango and Channa Dal

Are you a mango maniac? I have the dish for you. It’s a dish made of soaked chana dal ground with cumin and green chillies, and served with a tempering of mustard seeds and curry leaves. And most importantly, there is a generous inclusion of grated raw mango. This dish is a perfect dish for mango lovers, and is served as a snack to people who visit. It is also the best after-school snack during heatwaves.

It is very easy to make, with few ingredients. Perfect for Summer busy lives. The tartness of the mangoes, the sweetness from the coconut, the nuttiness from channa dal, and the spiciness from green chillies means that the flavours both contrast and compliment each other – is your mouth watering yet?

Ambe Dal is a Maharashtrian dish (also known as Amba or Ambyachi Dal). Usually made in Summer, this quick and easy salad is so cooling. Maharashtrian hospitality is legendary, and I can vouch for it as I have good friends from Pune. Maharashtrian cuisine has subtle variety and strong flavours and can be very mild to very spicy.

Green mangoes come in various levels of sourness, from tart to sweet-sour. Choose one that suits your own preferences. Serve Ambe Dal with rice, Kachumber, Kosumalli, and/or roti, perhaps on a banana or mango leaf.  It goes well with Aam Panna.

Are you looking similar dishes? Try Channa Dal with Greens, Matki and Golu Kola Salad with Coconut, Cucumber, Carrot and Green Mango Koshambari, Aamer Dal, Green Mango in Coconut Milk, and Coconut, White Peas and Green Mango Sundal.

Also try Pomelo, Green Mango and Pea Eggplant Salad with Tamarind Dressing, Vermicelli and Green Mango Salad, and Sweet and Sour Mango Curry.

Why not browse all of our Mango dishes, all Salads, our Channa Dal dishes, and all of our Maharashtrian recipes? Our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or explore our many Mid Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Ambe Dal | Ambyachi Dal | Green Mango and Channa Dal”

Green Mango and Masoor Dal | Aamer Dal | Tok Dal

Green Mango goes well with Indian lentils, and this time we pair it with Masoor Dal (called red lentils outside of India, but not to be confused with Indian red gram dal / toor dal). The recipe today is a tangy, simple Bengali dish with a touch of mustard oil. Simply spiced, it is delicious.

This recipe can also be made with Mung Dal instead of Masoor Dal, or with a mixture of both.

Similar recipes include Hara Mung Dal TakaAmbe Dal (Channa Dal with Green Mango), Mung Dal with Green Mango, Green Mango and Coconut Rice, Green Mango in Coconut Milk, and Masoor Dal with Green Chillies.

Browse our Green Mango recipes and our Dals. Our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or explore our Early Spring dishes.

Continue reading “Green Mango and Masoor Dal | Aamer Dal | Tok Dal”