Fennel Jam

Every part of the fennel bulb is edible, and the roots, bulb, shoots, fronds and seeds all carry the same intoxicating, aniseedy fragrance in varying intensities. It is not everybody’s favourite flavour vegetable, but I have not yet found a person who does not love this jam.

The fennel is cooked down with vinegar and brown sugar until it is sweet, jammy and sticky. You can use the jam with either savoury or sweet applications. The whole bulb is used – there is no waste at all. The jam goes perfectly in sandwiches, on toast, with cheese, topping a base of potato, polenta or cauliflower puree, or as part of a tapas or mezze table. Or just use as a chutney.

The recipe originates from The Guardian, and we’ve adopted and adapted it as a family favourite.

Choose fennel bulbs with stems and fronds intact if you can. Use the fronds as a herb: elevate a salad with them, add to salsa verde, add it to your cooling drinks, or chop and sprinkle over any dish to add an unmistakable fennel aroma.

Similar dishes include Fennel a la Grecque, Chilli Jam, Onion Jam, and Tomato and Chilli Jam.

Browse all of our Fennel dishes and all Jam recipes.

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Cumquat and Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Seed Syrup

We’ve been making lime pickles from the Makrut Limes (formally known as Kaffir Limes) from our tree. There are an awful lot of seeds in the limes. We don’t like to waste anything, and I also had a couple of dozen cumquats I was looking to use. The seeds from the limes are full of pectin, so I simmered them with the pulp that was left after juicing the cumquats. After straining, it made the most wonderful syrup.

The taste is sweet with citrus-bitter, a little like marmalade. It is almost set but now quite – a perfect consistency for toast and crumpets, and also for drizzling over rice pudding, Besan Payasam, icecream and other desserts. It is also a great drizzle over Brussels Sprouts and other veggies before roasting, onto soups, curries, rice etc.

Of course you won’t have lime seeds at your disposal. Make it anyway, just leave the seeds out. Or you can try with lemon seeds or seeds of other citrus. Add just enough sugar to retain the taste but overcome any sharp sour or bitter tastes. (You want to keep a little sour and a little bitter, don’t eliminate it altogether. We are not used to bitter tastes in our cuisines, but they are wonderful when used in the right way.)

Similar dishes include Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup, Cumquat Tea, and Cumquat Chutney.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes and all of our Lime dishes. Our Syrups are here. Or explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Algerian Eggplant Salad and Spread | Betanjal M’charmel

We love our pastes, purees, spreads, dips and powders, and the kitchen is always full of them. On a cold and rainy early Summer day, we wanted tea and snacks, so two spreads were created for the crusty bread from our Italian fruiterer, and life was good again. We no longer cared about the rain.

This spread (or side salad, mezze style), is made from sliced eggplant which has been baked until soft and mashed with spices. It is then gently fried until all moisture is lost, and served with harissa. Delicious! Sometimes it is referred to as a jam, rather than a salad or spread.

Similar dishes include Eggplant Pahi, Grilled Eggplant with Walnuts and Pomegranate, Eggplant in Spicy Tomato Sauce, Broad Bean Puree with Chilli Oil, White Bean, Sage and Roasted Garlic Spread, and Green Olive Tapenade.

Browse all of our Spreads, Dips, Pastes and Purees. Our Salads are here. Or explore our Early Summer dishes.

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Easy Cumquat Marmalade

Beautiful cumquats make beautiful jam, and so it is to the stove top that we turn this morning. Some cherry tomatoes are drying in the oven, taking the chill off of the kitchen, and we chop, soak and simmer cumquats before turning them into the most delicious marmalade. Breakfasts are going to be amazing this month!

This jam is also an exceptional accompaniment to hot Indian curries. The sweetness tempers the heat of the dish, and the cumquat tartness is beautiful with the spices.

Similar recipes include Easy Summery Breakfast and Brunch Ideas, Cumquats Poached in Sugar Syrup, Cumquats in Gin, Cumquats Pickle, Cumquat Olive Oil, and Cumquat Vanilla Marmalade.

Browse all of our Cumquat recipes, and our other Jam recipes. Or explore our Late Winter dishes.

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Strawberry and Rhubarb Jam

There are two camps in jam making. One camp insists that the fruit should be simmered with the acid (usually lemon juice) until the liquid is reduced and the fruit is soft, before adding the sugar. This softens the fruit and makes a fairly smooth jam.

The other camp likes to macerate the fruit in sugar to extract the juices for a more flavoursome jam where the fruit is not as tender and thus the jam is more chunky style.

I don’t mind either style, and it depends on the fruit and my mood of the day. The first way is definitely quicker – no overnight or day-long soaking – but I also quite love a chunky jam.

For this recipe we are using the maceration method. It is Rhubarb season and thus we are putting it to good use. I have written before about my previous aversion to rhubarb, but recently fell in love with it after making a simple, sweet dessert.

In this jam I used some lavender sugar – about half and half with plain sugar. You can add your own flavourings, should you care to. I do love a Strawberry and Black Pepper Jam.

Looking for something to have with the jam? Try Scones, Griddle Cakes or Crumpets.

Similar recipes include Sweet Barley and Ginger Poached Rhubarb, Strawberry Jam, Crab Apple Jelly, and Fig Jam with Black Pepper.

Browse all of our Jam recipes and all of our Rhubarb dishes. Or explore our Late Winter recipes.

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Fig Jam with Black Pepper, Cinnamon and Ginger

Glen Ewin Estate is a function centre in the Adelaide Hills that is a venue for weddings, conferences and other events. It also has cellar door tastings for small boutique wineries, it features a nice restaurant, and has a small fig orchard or two. In fig season, you can arrange to visit and pick your own figs. It is a lovely activity on a warm Late Summer or Autumn day, for those of us who love to eat and cook with figs. I had a leisurely drive through the hills, always a pleasure, to arrive about 20 minutes prior to their closing time, but that was all that I needed. Armed with enough figs for jam and a weeks worth of eating/cooking, I ambled home again. There is nothing like fresh figs straight from the tree.

The jam I made with the figs is similar to other jams I love to make. I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, so they are generally on the tart side, and are flavoured with spices. So today’s Fig Jam has black pepper, cinnamon, ginger and a hint of chilli, as well as a couple of slurps of some red wine that was sitting, ignored, in the fridge.

Two parts figs. One part sugar. Cook and cook. Be gentle. Bottle.

(I read this recipe a while ago, with a nice story about a Grandmother and her jam making.)

This jam is so easy to make. I make small quantities of jam and keep the jars in the fridge, so am not overly concerned about the fruit-sugar ratio. If you are making large quantities to store for longer periods, please adhere to appropriate fruit-sugar ratios.

Similar recipes include Strawberry and Rhubarb Jam, Quick Strawberry JamQuince Jam, and Crab Apple and Pomegranate Jelly.

Also try Boozy Baked Figs.

Browse all of our Jam recipes and all of our Fig dishes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Hot Sweet Chilli Jam | A Chilli Paste to Die For

Some years ago my friend Franz shared the recipe for a chilli jam he was making, and as I had chillies everywhere (in the freezer, on the bush, dried, drying), I made a couple of jars too. One I gave to my Thai friends, and they ate the whole (large) jar within a week. Oh my goodness! They loved the heat and the sweetness.

The other jar has been in the fridge all of those years. The reason is, we are always making chilli jams, pastes, purees…. There are always multiple jars open in the fridge and more containers in the freezer. This particular one came to the fore the other day when a sambal was needed for some okra with coconut rice. After the intervening time, the jam was still absolutely excellent (perhaps better for the maturing), and tasted incredible. I mixed it with some Chinese Chilli-Blackbean paste for an instant sambal.

Chatting with Franz, I told him the story and asked him to send me the recipe again. Catastrophe! Neither of us could find a copy! That made me search deeper and longer until I found it. Not wanting to lose the recipe again, we are posting it here so we know where it is! Please make and enjoy, it is amazing. I have tweaked the recipe a little to suit my preference and available ingredients.

Similar recipes include Preserved Sweet Chillies, Green Chilli and Coriander Paste, Chilli Jam with Deep and Complex Flavours, Red and Green Chilli Pastes, and Tomato and Chilli Jam.

Browse all of our Chilli recipes and all of our Pastes, Purees and Jams. Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.

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100 Vegetables: #81. Quinces – Make Quince Syrup, Molasses, Vinegar, Quince Honey, Paste and Leather (and more…)

Ah, the scent of quinces when you take them out of the bag! Quinces typify Mid to Late Autumn and Early Winter. They are sometimes around also in Early Spring too, but these have been kept over Winter.  They are good keepers!

For years we slow poached quinces with spices in the oven, and froze batches to last us through the winter. We made Quince Jam/Jelly, and just occasionally Quince Paste. But we now have a great friend with quince trees, so each year there is an abundant supply. We have taken to regularly making Quince Paste, Syrup, Vinegar, Molasses and Honey. Here are our recipes for you.

The quince was sacred to Venus and Aphrodite as it was once a symbol of love, happiness and fertility in Greek and Roman times. From a tree with pale pink blossoms, the fruit is so aromatic. When cooked, it has the most interesting and wonderful flavour and a slightly grainy texture. The pectin in the fruit means that it makes the best jelly.

When raw, the quinces are bright green, but they mellow to yellow as they ripen (and that wonderful scent develops). They are tough fruit with a hard skin, but they damage easily. They will keep for months if carefully handled, but Quince Jelly is best made with fresh fruit.

The fruit is often covered with a fine down. Rinse this off before peeling or cutting quinces. Be careful as you cut as the flesh is quite hard. It will also brown quickly so drop the cut fruit into acidulated water.  As the fruit cooks, it turns firstly a delicious pink-red, and with longer, slow cooking it turns a deep ruby red.

Please also have a look at our Autumn Preserving suggestions and Winter Preserving suggestions. Or simply browse our Early Winter recipes.

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Onion Jam | Onion Marmalade | Confit d’Oignon

The deep richness of this onion jam with its spicy undertones is a perfect winter condiment.

Onion Jam (aka Onion Marmalade or, as the French call it, Confit d’Oignon) is a great condiment to have on hand. Rich and deep with a spicy undertone, it is a great accompaniment to cheese, baked dishes, curries, roasted vegetables and more. It is a rich, gutsy mixture, great added to soups, on sandwiches with layers of grilled vegetables, or in a vegetable stack with lasagne sheets, at BBQs, or in toastie cheese sandwiches –  you will find lots of uses.

Are you looking for other Onion recipes? Try Onion Salad with Sesame Oil, Farinata with Tomato and Onions, Kanda Poha and Onion Pakora.

Perhaps you are looking for recipes for Relish or Chutney? Try Ousbacks Roasted Red Pepper and Apple Relish, Cumquat Chutney and Caponata Siciliana.

Feel free to browse our Onion recipes and Relish recipes. Or you might like to browse Sweet and Savoury Jam recipes. Check out our easy Early Winter recipes.

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Quick Lemon Marmalade

Late Autumn sees the first lemons, and jam is a perfect way to begin using them.

Autumn brings such a wealth of fruits that can be preserved in some way – Pomegranates, Quinces, Tomatoes, Crab Apples and new Ginger are abundant, and a few lemons are becoming available.

One easy way to use up a surfeit of lemons and provide breakfast jam for the coming winter is to make this quick lemon marmalade. No tedious slicing involved – it is all done by the food processor.

Are you looking for recipes that use lemons? Try Quick Pickled-Preserved Lemon Slices in Oil, Lemon Rice, and Lemony Sago with Coconut Milk.

Other jams that you might like to try are Fig Jam with Ginger and Black Pepper, Quick Strawberry Jam, Tomato and Chilli Jam (savoury), and Cumquat Marmalade.

You might like to browse all of our Jams and all of our recipes for Lemons.  Or be inspired by our collection of easy Mid-Autumn recipes.

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