Moraiya Kitchari | Barnyard Millet Kitdchari | Sama ki khichdi

Moraiya Kitchari is a delightful dish, healthy and nourishing. It is regularly made for Navratri fasting, Ekadashi fasting or any other time of Hindu fasting as it is an easily digestible dish. It is delicious in its own right – lightly spiced and less vigorous of taste than many Indian dishes, but don’t put it aside because of that. Try it with a wet curry like a yoghurt or besan curry, even a Poritha Kuzhambu! You will enjoy.

Moraiya is composed of tiny, white, round grains. In India, cereal grains are not consumed during fasts. Hence, Moraiya is a popular alternative, especially during Navratri. It is often used in place of rice, although it does not cook into separate grains like long grained rice. It is quite sticky when it is cooked and the grains stick together somewhat.

Are you looking for other Kitchari dishes? Try this one with Sago, Peanuts and Potatoes, or Maharashtrian Kitchari with Masoor Sprouts, or a Simple Parsi Kitchari.

You might like to check to see whether we have posted other Moraiya recipes. You can browse all of our other Kitchari recipes here. Our Indian recipes are here. Or explore our Early Spring dishes here.

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Subudana Kitchari with Potatoes and Peanuts | Sago Kitchari | Sago Pilaf

Remember Kurma? If you are of a certain age, and Australian, you will recall his TV shows of vegetarian Indian cooking. He really was the first to bring Indian food to Australians in a way that made it easily comprehensible and easy to cook. He was a stickler for detail, and for this I love him. So many recipes out of India these days are low in detail, low in precision, and that allows others to take liberties with Indian recipes. Soon, Indian food is no longer Indian food, but some mish mash of regional differences and non-Indian preferences.

One small example. I am constantly frustrated by recipes that say “1 cup rice”. Which rice? Basmati? Short grained? Long grained? Red or white? A South Indian variety? or a North Indian Variety? And it can make a huge difference to the end result. Do you need rice that is harder? Soft? Sticks together? Separates beautifully? Kurma would never leave one in doubt.

We don’t use rice in this recipe, even though it is a kitchari. This recipe from Kurma uses sago. But as usual, Kurma is precise.

Are you interested in other Sago recipes? Try Sago Payasam, and Sago Coconut Payasam.

We have quite a number of Kitchari recipes, for example Maharashtrian Kitchari with Masoor SproutsGujarati Kitchari, and Bengali Kitchari.

Feel free to browse all Sago recipes, and all of our Kitchari Recipes. Browse our Indian recipes here. Or take some time to explore our Late Summer recipes.

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Masoor Sprouts Rice | Maharashtrian Kitchari

Today’s recipe is a kitchari from Maharashtra that incorporates sprouts made from masoor lentils, and which uses Goda Masala. Goda Masala is a spice mix unique to Maharashtra. I should say, one of the several spice mixes unique to that state of India. It is a spice mix that is complex and layered in flavours. There are a whole range of dishes that use it (e.g. Masoor Sprouts Usal), and we intend to make a few over the next weeks.

Goda Masala can be difficult to get outside of Maharashtra – try in North Indian groceries, because those specialising in South Indian ingredients won’t have heard of it. You can try to make your own masala – I generally prefer to do this, but several of the spices used in Goda Masala are hard to find outside of Maharashtra, even in India.

This kitchari is pilaf style rather than the South Indian style which is more porridge-like. It uses the long grained basmati rice rather than the shorter grained rice of South India.

Check out other Goda Masala recipes here. There are many other Kitchari recipes here. You will find more sprouts recipes here. Or explore all of our Maharashtrian recipes and our Indian recipes. Feel free to browse our Late Spring recipes here.

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Cauliflower, Mung Bean and Broken Wheat Kitchari

A Kitchari with a difference

Making rice with veggies is so easy, and can be made with whatever is in the fridge. This is my general method for making Kitchari with cracked wheat and vegetables. Today the vegetable is roasted cauliflower. The cauliflower melts into the kitchari, leaving a beautiful creamy texture and flavour.

Have a look at our Cracked Wheat Kitchari recipe. You might like to check out all of our other kitchari recipes too.

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An Aromatic Gujarati Kitchari

A Gujarati Kitchari

This is an aromatic and warming khichadi, beautiful in its spicing. In Gujarati meals, khichari is served at the end of a meal. In other parts of India, like Bengal, it is often the centre-piece of the meal. This recipe is adapted from one in My Bombay Kitchen’s kitchari – it is  the author’s mother’s recipe, so it has strong Gujarati influences.

Traditionally, North India uses long grain rices like basmati for kitchari. The kitchari is light with separate rice grains. As you move south, short grained rices are used, like sona masoori, and the kitchari becomes denser with a buttery texture.

Serve this one with yoghurt curry and pickles – eggplant pickles, perhaps.

 

We have a lot of kitchari recipes. You can browse them here.

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Parsi Kitchari

A gentler Kitchari, a Parsi recipe

This version of Kitchari is a very simple dish. Simple it is indeed, but also perfect. It comes from the book My Bombay Kitchen by Niloufer King. I love kitchari and exploring kitchari recipes. The only spice in the tadka in this recipe is cumin, and the taste and crunch of the cumin against the rice and dal is amazing. I do hope you enjoy it.

Note that there are many English alternate spellings of Kitchadi — khichdi, kitchari, khichri, khichdee, khichadi, khichuri, khichari, kitcheree, kitchree, khichdi, and many other variants, and each Indian language has it’s own variation e.g. Hindi खिचड़ी khicṛī, Urdu: کھچڑی‎ khicṛī, Oriya: ଖେଚେଡ଼ି khecheṛi, Bengali: খিচুড়ী khichuṛi, Gujarati: ખીચડી khichḍi. It is also known as Pongal in Sth India.

You might like to browse all of our Kitchari recipes. Or try some Parsi recipes. All of our rice dishes are here and here. And our Indian dishes here.

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14-Spice Kitchari | Bengali Bhog Kitchari

An amazing Kitchari from Bengal

This dish is a powerful, multi flavour-layered experience, created from the humble rice and mung dal, and that leaves one feeling so wonderfully warm for hours after. It doesn’t take long to cook – but does take a little thought to keep all of those spices in order!

The Mung Dal and rice are dry roasted, imparting a lovely warm aroma and taste to the khichdi

You might like to browse all of our kitchari recipes.

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Buttered Steamed Kitchari

Steaming brings a different characteristic to kitchari

You can make kitchari in many ways – in a slow over overnight, in a rice cooker, using a pressure cooker, in a thermos too indeed, in a normal manner on the stove top in a saucepan. You can even steam it.

Reading Vasant Lad’s book on Ayurveda for Self Healing this morning, I thought I might make some kitchari as we are eating very lightly for a week.

You can browse all of our Kitchari recipes here. Or explore Ayurvedic recipes. Browse our Rice recipes here and here.

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Sakkarai Pongal | Sweet Pongal from Jaffna

A dish for Thai Pongal especially, but also wonderful at home.

Pongal is a creamy rice and mung dal dish from South India (and from the Tamil cuisine in Sri Lanka) which can be made savoury and sweet.  In many ways, pongal is similar to the kitchari dish of North India.

Sweet pongal is made at home, but also made as naivedyam and prasadam – gifts to the gods during the different festivals. It is the essential dish for Thai Pongal, a festival each January where families cook sweet pongal over an open fire (if possible).

I love it for breakfast, particularly in the coldness of Mid Winter.

You might like to browse other Pongals, and some Kitcharis. Have a look at our other Naivedyam and Prasadam dishes, and other Thai Pongal dishes. Read about Thai Pongal, or browse other Rice dishes.

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Urad and Red Rice Kitchari

An unusual kitchari, oven cooked, slow cooked, or stove top.

Rediscovering a wonderful ceramic oven dish with lid, it was put to use cooking another kitchari, this time made with red rice. Most Indian and some Asian groceries will stock it. Red rice is a very healthy rice – I use Matta rice from Kerala.

This kitchari originates from Korea, but I have made it more Indian than Korean. It is not a traditional Indian kitchari, but is very tasty nevertheless.

Are you looking for Kitchari recipes? Browse them here. Have a look at our rice recipes here and here also. Explore the Urad recipes here and here. And read about Rosa Matta Rice as well.

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Cracked Wheat and Mung Kitchari

A great, different kitchari

Kitchari is generally made with short grained rice and mung dal, cooked until they both collapse into a semi solid dish which is nourishing and tasty. Kitchari has been adopted globally as a healthy, quick dish, easy to digest and compatible with a lot of dietary requirements and fads.

Outside of India, though, recipes vary dramatically from the original. Long grained Basmati is used rather than the more sticky short grain rices like Soma Masouri. This changes the nature of the dish. Soupy and porridge-like consistencies are called Kitchari. And dishes made from other ingredients are labeled Kitchari.

Although the genesis of this dish of cracked wheat and mung dal comes from an approach which was called a Kitchari, it breaks almost every rule for a true, traditional Kitchari. It is more like a savoury gruel, a dal perhaps, or porridge. But as Kitchari literally means “mixture” or “mess”, we will let it pass.

Cook this dish with beautiful, yellow split mung dal – overnight in the slow cooker is ideal, for a warming and nourishing breakfast.

We have a lot of kitchari recipes. You can browse them here. Explore our other rice dishes here and here too. Read our Indian Essentials here, and perhaps browse information on Spices.

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Sweet Pongal | Sakkarai Pongal without Milk

A beautiful sweet dish for Pongal, or any time. Enjoy!

A great dish at any time, sweet, nourishing and comforting, and especially good for the South Indian Thai Pongal Festival and similar festivals in other parts of India, in January. A mixture of rice and mung dal sweetened with jaggery, it is a warming and comforting dish.

You might be looking for other Pongal recipes. There are sweet versions (sakkarai), and you might like to try the others: Sakkarai Pongal from Jaffna; Sakkarai Pongal with Milk and Sakkaria Pongal without Milk.

And there is a savoury version, called Ven Pongal. You can see that one here.

Or browse all of our Kitchadi recipes here and here, and our Rice recipes here and here. Have a look at all of our Indian dishes. You might like to take some time and browse all of our Mid Summer recipes.

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Ven Pongal | Savoury Pongal | South Indian Kitchari

A dish loved throughout South India.

I have been involved in one of the most joyous activities for someone who loves cooking and loves Indian food – testing and proofing Indian Festival recipes for a publication soon to be released. In fact, I hear it is at the printers as I write. The publication will outline 15 Indian festivals and associated activities, including traditional foods that are cooked by families during the festival. The publications are aimed at Western audiences, for media when they want more information about Indian traditions, and also those who have lost touch with or are curious about the traditions of India and want more information.

I was involved in testing a number of dishes, including this one which did not make the final cut. Never mind, it is your gain! I hope to bring you the other dishes once the publication is released.

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