Masala Mung Wadi | Golden Lentil Drops in a Tomato Garlic Sauce

With the pile of Mung Wadi sitting on my kitchen counter, tonight was the night to transform them into a wonderful, but simple curry.

As our late spring weather continues to be cold, and I feel doubts about the heat of Summer that I longingly anticipate, we still look  for warming dishes in the evenings. With the pile of Mung Wadi sitting on my kitchen counter, tonight was the night to transform them into a wonderful, but simple curry.

You might like to browse our extensive Indian Recipe Collection, and also read how to make Mung Wadi.  We have a few wadi recipes. Or browse all of our Indian recipes here and here.  You might get inspiration from our Spring time recipes here and here.

Also, don’t confuse wadi with vada. Vada (which, confusingly, can sometimes be called wadi) are South Indian, savory, deep fried fritters, generally made of ground lentils. They are super soft and squishy. Wadi can be found all over India, but vary from place to place. They are hard, sun-dried ground lentil mixtures, and some are made from seeds and vegetables (these latter ones are usually called vathral rather than wadi).

Continue reading “Masala Mung Wadi | Golden Lentil Drops in a Tomato Garlic Sauce”

Mung Wadi | Mung Vadi | Mangodi | Mung Dal Badis | Dried Mung Dal Nuggets

Indian cuisine has a wealth of sun dried ingredients.

Mmmm, mangodi. I have a fascination at the moment with all things dried in Indian cuisine. Traditionally, the drying is done in the sunshine, but we often don’t have that luxury. However, with a dehydrator we can make dried wadi, vadagam, and other goodies.

Mung Wadi are a type of wadi and are special dried lentil dumplings usually made with mung dal, but other dals (yellow, red, split green or urad dal) can be used. They can be made quite plain (allowing more versatility in the spicing of their final dish) or spices can be added before drying. Like any canvas, they can take quite a range of spices and even some herbs.

On their own, these wadi are not edible, but deep fried, sauteed in a little oil or dry roasted they can be used on their own as a snack; in curries, adding spices and texture; in stirfries, soups and sambars; and in rice dishes etc. Cooked in a sauce, these dry brittle nuggets soak up the flavor and the sauce and becomes spongy and tender. Even crushed, they can be added to salads, sprinkled over the tops of soups or over steamed or BBQ’s vegetables.

You might also like to try Tomato, Eggplant and Potato Subzi with Wadi (Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi), or Masala Mung Wadi – in a Tomato-Garlic Sauce.. Or browse all of our Indian recipes here and here.  You might get inspiration from our Spring time recipes here and here.

Continue reading “Mung Wadi | Mung Vadi | Mangodi | Mung Dal Badis | Dried Mung Dal Nuggets”