King Oyster Mushrooms with Special Miso Sauce

A wonderfully surprising dish.

In this dish the King Oyster mushrooms have been sliced quite finely, although they can be sliced thicker. They are marinated in our Special Miso Sauce and pan fried with the marinade. It is a deeply flavoured and delicious dish, perfect with rice and a green salad.

The Special Miso Sauce can be made any time prior to the mushrooms. It stores well in the fridge or freezer.

King Oyster Mushrooms are also known as King Trumpet Mushrooms or Eryngii. 

Similar recipes include Caramelised King Oyster Mushrooms, Risotto with Mushrooms, Pasta with Porcini Mushroom Sauce, and Mushroom Curry.

Check out our collection of Miso recipes here.

Feel free to browse all of our mushroom recipes. Or explore our Early Summer dishes. Continue reading “King Oyster Mushrooms with Special Miso Sauce”

Roasted Eggplant with Special Miso Sauce

The thing about Special Miso Sauce is that it is rich and dark and almost overwhelming in its deep flavours, so it is perfect for dishes in which you might use, if you weren’t vegetarian, things like fish sauce or anchovies. Not that it tastes the same but it does have that same affinity for certain ingredients.

And we all know just how well miso pairs with eggplant anyway – it is a classic combination in the miso-loving parts of the world. So in this dish we bring together eggplants and the Special Miso Sauce for wonderful results and a very simple dish.

Similar recipes include King Oyster Mushrooms with Special Miso Sauce, Algerian Eggplant Salad, Roasted Eggplant with Crushed Chickpeas, and Eggplants in Tamarind Leaf Paste.

Check out our collection of Miso recipes here.

Browse all of our Eggplant dishes and our Miso recipes. Or explore our Late Autumn dishes.

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Noodles with Fried Eggplant, Miso and Walnuts

I hadn’t really cooked any dishes from Ottolenghi’s books for about a year (and it would be another 6 months before I went back to cooking his recipes regularly). When I began cooking from Plenty More again, I realised 2 things: Firstly how much I had missed the flavours of Ottolenghi, and secondly I remembered the almost tedious number of processes in each recipe.

The deep sweetness and intensity produced by miso paste, combined with other Japanese staples, are guaranteed to put a smile on your dial on an overcast Winter or Early Spring day.

This one is no different. It has 7, yes seven, different processes with associated pots, pans and equipment. Make the vegetarian dashi, ribbon cut and soak ginger and spring onions, prep the eggplants, deep fry the eggplants, saute the onions, walnuts etc, make the sauce, cook the noodles.

So Ottolenghi flavours come at a price. Leave an afternoon free – at least several hours to cook and clean up – when making any of his dishes.

To be fair though – the man I call the Master of Flavour produces amazing dishes that makes the hours worth the effort!

This is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area. You can see the original recipe here.

Similar recipes include Roasted Eggplant with Special Miso Sauce, Deep Fried Eggplant, Ginger Scallion Noodles, and Udon Noodles and Shimejii Mushrooms.

Browse all of our Japanese dishes and all of our Eggplant recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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Collection: How to Use Miso | 24 Recipes Using Miso

Oh my goodness, Miso comes in so many different varieties, strengths and uses, sometimes it is difficult to know where to begin. But miso is so necessary in a vegetarian kitchen to add umami to dishes in the easiest and quickest way.

So we put together some of our favourite Miso recipes for you to begin experimenting and hopefully you will fall in love with this funky paste, just as we have.

Similar articles include What to Do with Daikon Radish, A Collection of Kitchdi Recipes, and Delicious Recipes with Green Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Miso, and all of our Collections. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Collection: How to Use Miso | 24 Recipes Using Miso”

Simmered Daikon Radish with Miso and Sesame Sauce

Daikon is popular in Japan and Korea (and each have a slightly different type of daikon), so flavours from these countries pair well with this long white radish. It is also used quite commonly in India, BTW, but here we are focusing in on some Japanese flavours.

The daikon is simmered with kombu, my favourite seaweed, and then served with a tahini-miso sauce. It is so delightful, and I serve it as a small starter. If I am eating alone, I dip the slices into the sauce, but for company, it is easier to place a spoonful of the sauce on top of each slice.

Sometimes I sprinkle some Korean chilli flakes or Japanese Shichimi Togarashi, (seven spice pepper) over the slices of daikon, and love the slight spice hit they give.

You might like to read What to Do with Daikon Radish.

Similar recipes include Mustard Greens with DaikonDaikon Salad with Coconut, and Daikon Dal.

Browse all of our Daikon recipes, and all of our Japanese recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Special Miso Sauce

This recipe is one that Taste published some time ago and a friend pushed me to have a look at it. I was very sceptical – cooking miso is not something that I do often (heat destroys some of its health properties), and cooking lemon juice is rarer (cooking changes its flavour). But I do like to test recipes, especially if prompted or recommended by friends. So one Saturday afternoon when I was roasting some broccoli and needed a sauce for it, I set about making this special miso sauce. With only 5 ingredients – miso, rice vinegar, sugar, lemon juice and mirim – the result is precisely as you imagine. Dark. Rich. Bright. Chilli-hot. Sweet.

The recipe is originally from Hiroko Shimbo’s Hiroko’s American Kitchen. While it uses Japanese ingredients, it is not something traditionally Japanese – far far too bold and funky for the subtleness of Japanese cuisine.

The premise for this sauce is that

  • it is so very easy to make
  • it freezes really well, but not solid, so you can spoon it out into dishes whenever you want
  • it can be used in almost anything – stirred into sauteed potatoes and into soups and braises. Toss through fried rice. Stir into lentil stews and make miso soup with it. Toss roasted broccoli and cauliflower in it. Add a little to dressings, dips and spreads.

Pretty much the number of uses of this sauce is infinite, guided only by your imagination. Add a little to a dish for full-on flavours, or add just a little for a mysterious undertone.

Actually it is so dark and funky, I’ll use it as a vegetarian substitute in place of fish sauce in some recipes.

Today, we roasted slabs of broccoli and served with the sauce. Broccoli shines when paired with something punchy, formidable and umami-rich, so the combo works divinely.

Similar recipes include King Oyster Mushrooms with Special Miso Sauce, Roasted Eggplant with Special Miso Sauce, Miso Peanut Coconut Sauce, Miso Vegetables and Rice, and  Miso and Tofu Dipping Sauce.

Browse all of our Miso dishes and all of our Japanese recipes. Or explore our Late Autumn food.

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The Best Miso-Peanut-Coconut-Chilli-Turmeric Sauce

This is a totally magic sauce – it makes every dish you use it in very special. I use it in a hundred different ways – so many, you might want to make a double recipe. It will keep for 2 – 3 weeks in the fridge and it reheats easily.

The sauce is a combination of sweet, chilli and sour, with the tempering of the coconut milk and peanut butter. The sour flavours are layered in a tantalising way – you have palm vinegar or rice vinegar, lime juice, umaboshi and tamarind, and yet it is not too much. The sweet is layered with sweet soy and palm sugar. The heat comes from fresh green chillies and red chilli jam or paste. I usually have this one and this complex-flavoured one on hand – you can use what is in your cupboards, or you might like to make one of these so that you have some on hand. As always, because chilli pastes vary in heat level (and so does your tolerance), adjust the amounts in the recipe to your preference.

The sauce is a brown one though, or beige rather, from the soy, sugar and tamarind. But don’t mind that, it is delicious. Normally I would throw a heap of coriander leaves on top of the dish, but thanks to the record-breaking heatwaves we have had, the coriander fields are burnt to a crisp. However, do scatter some chopped peanuts over the top of your dishes using this sauce.

How is this sauce used? I drizzle the sauce on soups. Dunk noodles in it. It makes a wonderful sauce for deep fried tofu, or baked sweet potato, or steamed snake beans (or all 3 together). It goes beautifully drizzled over steamed, grilled or baked vegetables. Mix it through salads, especially Gado-Gado.  Pour around steamed dumplings.

You might like to read our Very Special Turmeric Recipes.

Similar dishes include Fried Tofu in Sweet Peanut Sauce, and How to Make Nut Butters.

Browse all of our Peanut recipes and Peanut Sauces. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Sweet Potatoes and Deep Fried Tofu in Coconut Miso Broth with Noodles

Oh deep fried tofu! Sssshh, don’t tell tofu-haters how good deep fried tofu is! I think we should keep it to ourselves. Deep frying changes the soft mushy texture of tofu to a crispy outer skin with a pillow soft inner. If you are drooling already, have a look at this deep fried tofu with a peanut sauce. Sensational.

This recipe takes some deep fried tofu and cooks it with sweet potatoes in a coconut green curry broth, and then serves it with noodles and coriander leaves. It is typically S. E. Asian, like the curries of Thailand and Malaysia. I also make it as one of my Miso Soup options, adding a little more broth to the ingredients. Miso Soup with Sweet Potato, Tofu and Noodles.

If you are not familiar with using miso, read about the different types.

Similar recipes include Noodles with Spring Onions and Edamame, Chinese Bean Curd with Mushrooms and Vegetables, Lemak Style Vegetables, and Black Pepper Tofu.

Recipes with Rice Vermicelli Noodles include Green Mango and Vermicelli Salad. Or read about other Asian Noodles.

Browse all of our Tofu recipes and all of our Sweet Potato dishes. Our S. E. Asian dishes are here. Or explore our Late Winter set of recipes.

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Miso and Ginger Dressing

In our series of miso recipes and especially miso dressings, we have a creamy, salty, tangy dressing today. It is wonderful spooned over any tofu, salad, grated raw vegetables, steamed or grilled vegetables, and in wraps and sandwiches. It livens up dull soups as well. The recipe is a version of one in The Book of Miso.

Similar recipes include Mustard Turmeric Dressing, Miso and Tahini Dressing, and Miso and Sesame Dressing.

Browse all of our Dressings and all of our Miso recipes. Or explore our Mid Winter recipes.

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Miso Slow Braised Cabbage

Four hours to cook a small white cabbage? Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. This works both as a stand-alone starter or as a side for meal. I like it as a deeply flavoured mid afternoon snack too, but then our snacks are usually a little unusual. It is a wintery dish, but don’t let that prevent you from cooking it in the cooler weather of other seasons.

This dish is an Ottolenghi dish, from his Guardian column. First published four years ago, he speaks of it often as an amazing example of the transformation of food during the process of cooking. It is something that always enthralled me, in fact it is the basis of my love of cooking. The way that an ingredient changes from one thing to another as a result of little
more than the application of time and heat, it really is magic. We take it for granted: we sweat an onion in oil, for example, and it changes from something that makes us cry to something that makes us smile with joy at its brilliantly warming sweetness. Each time we throw the acrid, dung-scented spice asafoetida into some oil, it changes to an earthy taste of garlic and onions. We pop mustard seeds in heated oil and they lose their hot intensiveness and become nutty.

And we braise cabbage for 4 hours for this remarkable result. It doesn’t look like a vegetarian dish, in fact it looks quite meaty. But vegetarian it is. It does need a strong dish to accompany it, or something very bland. I have been serving it just with a little plain rice, lemon and soured cream.

Similar recipes include Baked Yoghurt in Vine Leaves, French Braised Lettuce with Broad Beans and Peas, and Pasta Baked with Cabbage and Cheese.

Browse all of our Cabbage dishes, our Braised recipes and all of our Ottolenghi recipes. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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