Salty Macadamia and Golden Syrup Biscuits | Egg Free

We don’t eat many sweet things around here, especially sweet baked goods – perhaps a little more in Winter than Summer. It is not that we don’t like them (we LOVE them), but biscuits and cakes are basically sugar and butter held together with flour, right? Also, we don’t cook with eggs, so that limits our range as well.

But it is the one of the coldest weeks of Winter as I write, and we are looking for a few more sweet things – rice pudding, apple crumble, golden syrup dumplings, and some biscuits for our cuppa.

I was alerted to this recipe by @CallisClan – she made them one day from a book called Winter on a Farm. The original recipe is here. I have made a slight variation, adding coconut and a little bicarb soda (which adds a little more colour and chewiness to the biscuits). I’ve also sprinkled a little salt over the top before cooking for a delicious sweet-salty taste.

The biscuits are not unlike ANZAC biccies, starting from a base of oats, flour, golden syrup and butter. This combination is so Australian. But the technique and other ingredients differs a little. In ANZAC biscuits, when cooked well, the flour is  partially cooked by the hot butter mix and boiling water. This changes the texture considerably. But in this recipe, the mixture is cooled before adding to the oats and flour. It makes a remarkable difference.

The salt sprinkled over the top of these biscuits is not compulsory and can be omitted.

Similar recipes include Date Tahini Biscuits, Semolina Butter Biscuits, Date Loaf, ANZAC Biscuits, Tahini Biscuits, and Scones.

Or browse all of our Biscuit Recipes.

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Bran Butter Biscuits | Egg Free

The Women’s Weekly cookbooks graced our home in the 80’s and 90’s (last century) and some of them are still really good. I do regret handing a lot of them on to friends and family over the years, but I still have a couple. The Biscuit one is good for a few eggless biscuits, something hard to find these days.

These are Australian style biscuits, not the (strange?) US version of biscuits.

I made these Bran Butter Biscuits because one of the young ones in my life loved oat biscuits when he was really young, and these are close enough for him. They are buttery, but with so little moisture they can be a little dry. Best snacked alongside a cuppa tea with a friend and some good gossip stories. You will eat more than you anticipate – make a double batch if necessary. I have used oat bran in this recipe but you can just as well use wheat bran.

I make these in the food processor. If you prefer to make by hand, use the usual method – sift the flour, salt and baking powder, add bran and sugar and rub in butter. Add water till the dough comes together. Then continue as per the recipe.

You can see in the photo that I let the second batch bake a little longer than the first. It is nice to have the extra colour on the biscuits.

Similar dishes include Garlic, Rosemary and Parmesan Biscuits, Bran Butter Biscuits, Date Tahini Biscuits, Wholemeal Bran Biscuits, Oat Cakes, Tahini Biscuits, and ANZAC Biscuits.

Browse all of our Biscuits (not many), and our Baking efforts. Or explore our Late Spring dishes.

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Wholemeal Bran Biscuits | Egg Free

This is a great way to get your daily intake of bran! They say we need at least 2 Tblspn of bran each day along with other forms of fibre, to keep us, uhuum, regular. Rather than mix bran with our cereal for breakfasts, this is a more palatable way of getting our allowance. Three of these crispy crunchy biscuits will provide what you need. Eat plain, or with some butter, honey or other spreads, with cheese, or with a large cuppa.

Biscuits like this normally include eggs. As you know I do not use eggs in my cooking. In this recipe we have replaced them with a mixture of chickpea flour, cashew powder, baking soda and water. It also makes the bickies more flavoursome!

Similar recipes include Garlic, Rosemary and Parmesan Biscuits, Bran Butter Biscuits, Oat Cakes, Tahini Biscuits, and ANZAC Biscuits.

Browse all of our Biscuits (not many), and our Baking efforts. Or explore our Late Spring dishes.

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The Life Changing Loaf of “Bread”

My daughter put me on to this loaf many years ago – it’s a nutritionist’s dream as it is packed with all things good. Fibre plus, nuts, seeds, chia, turmeric, and raw honey (or use sweetner of choice).

There are a few variations on the bread, but the one I make is based on My New Root’s recipe. I have made a couple of alterations over the years and have reproduced it below.

Similar recipes include Overnight Oats, Bondi Overnight Oats, and Sweet Quinoa and Oats Congee.

Browse all of our Oats recipes. Or explore our Early Winter dishes.

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Sweet Quinoa and Oat Congee

Congee, back in the Ming dynasty, was used as a vehicle for medicinal herbs. Even without the herbs, it is such a great vehicle for love, comfort and nourishment. It is comfort food indeed, eaten at any time but especially when one is feeling under the weather, or has stomach trouble. It is also reputed to be suitable for eating when one has a hangover.

Most people think of congee as a rice porridge, but depending on where you lived in Asia, your congee might be made with millet, barley, corn, mung beans or other legumes, mixed with or without rice. Sadly, it is only the South China version made with rice that has become known more universally, probably because it is so creamy and mild. Congee has lots of names across the world too, eg jook (Cantonese, Korean), jok (Thailand), zhou (Mandarin), kanji (Tamil), chao (Vietnamese), canja (Portugese). In Thailand, they mix additional ingredients into the congee, but in China, it is served with toppings and sides.

Congee is a great way to prepare a meal out of nothing. A cup of rice, lentils or grain can be cooked with 8 – 10 cups of water and whatever flavourings are available in the pantry at the time. I prefer to cook congee in a clay pot, easily available from any Chinese store, as it gives a better flavour.

And most of all, congee is a meal that’s all about personal preference. Cook your chosen grain or lentil, for as long as it takes to get your perfect texture, flavour it as you will, and add the toppings that you enjoy. Today’s congee is made with Oats and Quinoa, a delicious combination that is perfect for breakfast or day time snack. Unlike our other congee recipes, it is one that is sweetened with the addition of dried fruit while cooking.

Similar recipes include Congee, Congee with Butternut and Ginger, Rice, Millet and Lentil Congee, Black Glutinous Rice Congee, and Red Rice and Adzuki Bean Congee.

Browse all of our Congee recipes, and all of our Quinoa and Oat dishes. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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What are ANZAC Biscuits?

ANZAC Biscuits are classic, traditional Australian biscuits made on ANZAC Day (and any other day of the year). They were commonly sent to the troops in the First World War and are named after the soldiers. ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.

The ANZAC biscuit was called a variety of other names before 1915, and the current name came in to use after the battle on Gallipoli Beach in Turkey. The first version of this rolled-oat based biscuit reportedly appeared around 1823, and over the next century took on various names such as Surprise Biscuits, Rolled Oat Biscuits, Munchies, Nutties and Crispies. Then around the early WWI years the name changed to Red Cross Biscuits and Soldier’s Biscuits. They were used as a form of fundraising, so they gave them a war connected name which helped sell them. The biscuits quickly became a popular food to send to Australia’s overseas forces, due to their accessible ingredients, easy cooking method, and lack of eggs that meant the biscuits kept well.

It is said that they were also known as Army Biscuit, ANZAC Wafer and ANZAC Tile, and were essentially a long shelf-life, hard tack biscuit which was eaten as a substitute for bread. The biscuits are very, very hard. Some soldiers preferred to grind them up and eat as porridge. They were made commercially from flour, sugar, milk powder and sugar.

Early on there was a home version of the ANZAC Biscuit that included eggs and that were sandwiched together with jam.

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Buttery Australian ANZAC Biscuits | Egg Free

Generally I use my Grandmother’s recipe for ANZAC Biscuits, but was curious about a recipe that increases the amount of coconut and butter. Other than that, the recipe is the same – a traditional one without the additions that the US variety of these “cookies” include. Good grief, USA, leave our beloved ANZAC biscuits alone.

The result of the slight alterations is a blonder biscuit, but otherwise a delightful one, perfect for a cuppa for afternoon tea on any day of the year. The biscuit is quite buttery with a definite coconut flavour.

It is the day after New Year, and it is likely to be one of my 2 or 3 baking efforts per year. I don’t have a sweet tooth, thankfully, and also do not use eggs in my recipes. Thus, the options for baking are limited on both accounts!

Originally, ANZAC Biscuits were made for the troops in the World Wars, and did not contain coconut (as it deteriorates rapidly, and possibly it was not readily available). The biscuits were “flat packed” for transport to the troops. Then, it seems, a little coconut was added to the recipe, and as times became easier, the amount of butter and coconut increased. Thus we have the buttery biscuits of today.

See this post for some notes about the use of bicarb soda in the recipes for ANZAC Biscuits. Don’t substitute the use of bicarbonate of soda with Self Raising Flour or Baking Powder, as its use is essential to the biscuit. The other essential element is Golden Syrup. There is no substitute, and this Australian ingredient gives these biscuits their beautiful caramelised taste.

You can read more about the history of ANZAC Biscuits here.

Similar recipes include Lemony Pepper Crackers, Tahini Biscuits, Australian Quick and Easy Date Slice, Scones, Oatmeal Crackers, and Traditional ANZAC Biscuits.

Browse all of our Biscuits, and explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Bondi Bircher Muesli | Bondi Overnight Oats

Muesli is a breakfast and brunch dish of raw rolled oats and other ingredients including grains, fresh or dried fruits, seeds and nuts, and may be mixed with cow’s milk, soy milk, almond milk, other forms of plant milk, yogurt and/or fruit juice. (Thanks, Wikipedia.)

Bircher Muesli was developed around 1900 by Maximilian Bircher-Brenner, a Swiss doctor and nutritionist, for his patients at his Zurich sanatorium as a way of getting more raw fruit into their diets. It is still a very popular breakfast in Switzerland and Germany, as well as many other parts of the world. The original recipe called for a higher ratio of fresh fruit to grain, and soaked the raw oats overnight since they took some time to soften. Each day the patients began their day with this mushy fruity mixture. Perhaps it was not an inspirational dish at the time, but in the past 12 decades, the dish has been refined and is an attractive start to the day.

Bircher Muesli traditionally contains a lot of apples, by way of juice and grated fruit. Bircher-Benner believed apples cured him of jaundice in his youth, and he strongly advocated the healing powers of diets high in fruit and vegetables. Thus originally it had few oats (about 1 Tblspn per person) and lots of fruit.

I guess Bircher Muesli was the original Overnight Oats! Here in Australia it is a perfect Summer breakfast. Fruit is plentiful in Summer – beautiful, perfect peaches, apricots, peacharines, nectarines, berries, plums, …. all and more freely available. This breakfast dish – the Australian version – celebrates our sunshine and Summer.

You must also try Overnight Oats. Other dishes include Shrikand and Besan Payasam, both interesting dishes for breakfast. See also Easy Summery Breakfast and Brunch Ideas.

Have a look at all of our Breakfast dishes here, or browse our easy Mid Summer recipes.

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Adzuki Bean, Barley and Pumpkin Soup with Miso and Parsley

Adzuki Beans with Sesame, Tamari and Miso – complimentary flavours for a warming soup

I must admit it. Adzuki beans have not reached the status of being a firm favourite in this household, as the sweetness of the beans can feel a little overwhelming in savoury settings. We had a couple of recipes we stuck to when cooking Adzuki. It was a pity, because we love the name Adzuki, it has such an evocative elegance about it.

That is, until recently. Via Lucy of the most excellent blog, Nourish Me, we discovered the tempering effects of cooking Adzuki with Toasted Sesame Oil, Tamari and Miso, and adding parsley and celery leaves. It makes sense, right? The more Northern Asian flavours to compliment a bean used commonly in Chinese, Korean and Japanese cooking. We also discovered how well Pumpkin goes with Adzuki.

You might like to also try Yoghurt and Barley Soup, South Indian Pumpkin Soup, Adzuki Sundal (briefly stirfried with coconut)Adzuki Bean and Parsley Soup, Special Pumpkin Soup, and  Red Rice with Adzuki Bean Congee.

Or are you after similar Barley Soup recipes? Try Barley and Root Vegetable Soup or Stew with Umeboshi and Sesame, Adzuki Beans, Barley and Pumpkin Soup, Barley Soup with Vegetables, and Italian Farmhouse Barley and Vegetable Soup.

You might like to browse our other Adzuki recipes, all of our Barley recipes, other Pumpkin Recipes, and our Soup recipes. We hope you enjoy! Or simply spend some time exploring our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Overnight Oats for Amazing Breakfasts

My predilection for pre-paring and pre-cooked prep took a new turn when I was introduced to Overnight Oats – oats that require no cooking but are simply soaked overnight for an instant morning breakfast. Firstly, it really does make a magnificent breakfast, so tasty. Then it is extraordinarily healthy. And most of all, it is quick and easy. Do what I do and take it to work for lunch sometimes too.

Although you can put the ingredients together for individual serves, it is more convenient to make a month’s worth of oats mixture at a time. About once per month, I take 15 – 20 medium jars, and prepare the  mixture. The jars line up on my bench, waiting patiently for their ingredients one by one. Then they go into the pantry cupboard.

Similar recipes include Wholemeal Bran Biscuits, Bondi Bircher Muesli/Overnight Oats, Prunes in Tea with Spices, and Porridge, Indian Style.

You can browse all of our Breakfast recipes here, and all of our Oats dishes here. Or simply browse all of our Mid Spring recipes.

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