Roasted Okra with Tomato, Lemon and Coriander Seeds

Even Ottolenghi loves okra. His books contain a range of okra recipes, and this one comes from Plenty. It is a classic combination of okra, tomato and lemon, with the Ottolenghi twist of herbs and spices. The use of preserved lemon is genius, and he uses it also in this Salad of Charred Okra and Preserved Lemon.

In this part of the world the quality of the okra is good, whether the okra is small or large. In other parts you might find that small okra pods have a more attractive texture than large ones, which can be a bit gloopy and stringy when cooked. Check your local large okra to see whether it will work in dishes like this. Middle Eastern and Indian groceries often stock frozen okra that are tiny, with a perfect firmness, and they come with an added bonus: the okra are ready-trimmed.

Are you looking for other Okra dishes? Try Sri Lankan Okra Curry, Kerala Okra Curry, and Greek Okra in Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Okra dishes and all of the Ottolenghi dishes we have tried. Or take some time to explore our Mid Winter dishes.

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Freekeh Salad with Broad Beans

When Ottolenghi says mix some Broad Beans with Freekeh, you say Ok. It just happened that I had a focus on both Broad Bean dishes (as they are growing in the garden as I write) and on Freekeh (as I got some awesome freekeh from my local Afghan market). Here they come together in true Ottolenghi style. This really is a great Spring dish.

It is said that Ottolenghi created this dish for Red Online.

Similar recipes include: Broad Bean Salad with Spring Onions, Chopped Salad, Cypriot Grain Salad, Green Beans with Freekeh, Walnuts and Tahini, and Broad Beans with Feta and Preserved Lemon.

Browse all of our Freekeh recipes, and our many many Salads. All of Ottolenghi dishes are here. Or take some time to browse our Mid Spring dishes.

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Soba Noodles with Eggplant and Mango

How extraordinary noodles are, and oh! What a variety! Think Japanese noodles, Chinese Noodles, Italian Noodles (pasta), Indian noodles (lots of them using interesting flours), noodles from Eastern Europe, and I guess there are many more around the world. Soba noodles are Japanese, and they make delightful cold dishes as well as hot. In Summer, cold Soba noodle dishes are almost like salads.

It is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one day per month where we publish  recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely.

Ottolenghi has the occasional noodle dish, and our current focus on his books brought us to this recipe in his book Plenty. It brings together mango and charred eggplant in a way that makes it seem way out there, but is perfectly balanced. It is such a surprising combination of flavours and that makes this a memorable dish from the first bite – sweet from the mango and savoury from the eggplant. It is a beautiful noodle for hot summer nights or for a simple weeknight dinner any night of the year. The leftovers only get better in the refrigerator, so Yotham highly recommends making enough for lunch leftovers.

This recipe calls for a lot of oil in which to fry the eggplant (from 220 – 300 ml in different versions Yotham has printed). But the frying turns the eggplant soft and silky, and almost meaty, if a vegetarian can say that. Follow your heart, but I do recommend frying in the amount of oil that he suggests.

Similar recipes include Glass Noodles with Spinach, and Glass Noodles and Green Mango Salad.

Browse all of our Noodle dishes and all of our Eggplant dishes. Our Ottoleghi recipes from Plenty are here. Or explore our dishes for Late Summer.

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Noodles with Spring Onions and Edamame

Do you have those times when Spring Onions (scallions, green onions) pile up in the fridge, forgotten? They are generally used in salads or as a garnish for soups and other dishes but rarely shine as a main ingredient. It is time to change that, and Ottolenghi is just the person to provide some inspiration.

This is one of Ottolenghi’s dishes that is a breeze to make, relatively speaking. In our Plenty More project, we’ve been making some of his more complex, time consuming and multi-pot making recipes, so it is a delight to make a dish that is simpler in preparation.

Yes, it is a dish from Plenty More, and is a simple stir fry of Spring Onions and Edamame, mixed with noodles, topped with coriander leaves and sesame seeds and dressed with Sesame oil, rice vinegar and lime juice. Don’t forget the lime – it is critical to this dish.

This is excellent with Steamed Aubergine.

Similar dishes include Pan Fried Edamame with Chilli, Lime and Salt, Spring Onion Soup, and Glass Noodles and Green Mango Salad.

Browse all of our Noodle recipes and all of our Edamame dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Brussels Sprout and Ginger Slaw

Like many families, Brussels Sprouts never appeared in our kitchen very often. Blame childhood memories of bitter, over-cooked little packages of fear on our plate. Thankfully, we are all wiser now, and our favourite ways of using Brussels Sprouts are raw and roasted.

Today’s salad is a lovely slaw of sprouts and carrots with ginger and chilli, dressed with yoghurt and mayo. How special! But who could create such a recipe, combining all of those flavours? It is of course from Ottolenghi. As much as I rant and  carry on about his recipes, I am truly in love with his flavour combinations and his sheer inventiveness. Good on you, Yotham – continue to challenge our thinking about food and stretch us outside our comfort zone. This recipe is from The Guardian.

It is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – a day per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books and articles – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Chopped Salad, Brussels Sprouts Salad, Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pomelo, and Brussels Sprouts Risotto.

Browse all of our Brussels Sprouts recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through Plenty More. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Herb and Walnut Fritters

These Iranian fritters are herbaceous and delicious. They are a perfect snack at afternoon tea time, or make a great lunch with flatbreads and fresh salads.

We make our herby fritters with a chickpea flour base rather than eggs. With a little eno or baking soda for aeration, it is the perfect replacement for eggs in this type of recipe.The inspiration was Ottolenghi’s dish in his book Simple. They are very easy to make and utterly delicious. These fritters are a bit of a fridge raid – use whatever soft herbs you have to hand.

Similar recipes include Spinach Fritters, Vegetable Fritters, and Chickpea Flour Fritters and Pancakes.

Browse all of our Fritters and all of our recipes from Simple. Or explore all of our Mid Summer recipes.

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Celery and Lemon Salad with Feta

I have a little New Year project going on for a year or so – focusing on recipes from Ottolengi’s Plenty More. I am afraid this book has been neglected before this project, even though it is a favourite in his collection. You will have noticed a few of his recipes appearing on the blog as they are scheduled and posted.

SO, Happy Weekend! And, in case you’ve just opened your eyes, a little weary after last night, not to mention the last few weeks of holidays and non-stop munching and gulping, get yourself into the kitchen and make this salad. It has the amazing quality of tasting equally healthy, tangy and comforting, just at a time when you need a little miracle. Truly this is the case.

I do hope that you enjoy this recipe. Celery Salads are rare, and I am always on the lookout for good ones to complement our collection.

We have compiled 30 Great Mid Summer Salads for you, so it is very easy to vary your salads each day.

Similar recipes include Celery Yoghurt Salad, Nashi Pear and Celery Salad, and some Simple Celery Salads.

Browse our Celery Salads and all of our Celery dishes. Our Ottolenghi recipes are here (or just the ones from Plenty More). Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.

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Turnip with Spices

Turnips are one of a group of forgotten winter vegetables, along with swedes and parsnips. Some would add cauliflower and cabbage to the list. We adore turnips, cooked or raw, on their own or in salads.

This recipe from Plenty More by Ottolenghi, blanches the turnips and then mixes them with a heady paste of chilli and spices. It is Oh So Good.

It’s a heady condiment, a bit like a pickle, which keeps in the fridge for a few days. It’s great added to sandwiches, wraps and salads, or served with a curry, with a herby rice, or with roti and chutney.

Similar recipes include Turnip and Swede Gratin, and Vegetable and Barley Soup with Turnips.

Browse all of our Turnip recipes, and all of our Pickles. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

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Cucumber and Tomato Raita with Lemon-Chilli Paste

Picture a Tunisian grandmother, a master at cooking kofta, making them with Ottolenghi. This scene from his Mediterranean series is a classic. She gets fully ticked off with his faffing around, the time he takes, the number of ingredients he uses. She sits on a stool in the corner, rolling her eyes and muttering under her breath. Ah, Grandma, we know, we KNOW.

It must have been a trial for Ottolenghi to bring out Simple, his latest book. Recipes pared down to their bare essentials. No more layerings of flavour upon flavour upon flavour. No more dishes that can be a meal in themselves. HE must have been the one rolling his eyes and huffing and puffing as testers and editors stripped yet another ingredient from a dish.

I am in 2 minds about Simple. Yes, there is a level of difficulty in his other books, and not all of those recipes are for typical week night cooking. But there is something in the Simple recipes that I miss. An undefinable something. It is as though every recipe in his other books stretches us in the kitchen somehow. A new ingredient, a new technique, a new way of cooking, a new combination of ingredients. Not so Simple. Some dishes are quite ordinary by comparison, albeit delicious.

Still, they are as visually pleasing as the dishes from his other books, and a delight in their own way (just a different way to the Ottolenghi we have been used to). This raita, a riff on an Indian dish, is quite good. I’ve said before that Ottolenghi does not yet understand Indian food very well – perhaps he doesn’t care about that. He has been known to use Indian ingredients in ways that don’t showcase them to their best. But in this dish, although not typically Indian, it is a pretty jolly good plate of food.  Love the inclusion of preserved lemon in the chilli paste which is layered on top of the raita. Brilliant.

Raita is traditionally served with an Indian meal as a salad and as a cooling agent, contrasting well with the spiciness of the rest of the meal.  Leave off the chilli paste if you want to serve it this way. But raita is very versatile. It is lovely as a dip, gorgeous with some warm pitta, and excellent spooned on top of spiced rice.

You can find the original recipe for this dish here.

Similar dishes include Pomegranate Raita, Pomelo Raita, and Carrot Raita.

Browse all of our Raita recipes. Our dishes from Simple are here, and all of our Ottolenghi recipes are here. You might like to check out our Indian dishes and our Indian Essentials. Or explore our Late Spring dishes.

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Celeriac and Tart Apple Salad with Poppy Seed

Sometimes when you are making Ottolenghi dishes, when you are rubbing that vinegar and sugar mixture into the onions or the chilli concoction into the cucumbers, massaging gently, when you are cooking the fourth or fifth element for the recipe, you think this is never going to work, why am I bothering? But then you taste the final dish, and you melt, and the flavours are incredible, and it is totally worth the messy kitchen and the washing up.

This is another Ottolenghi salad that brightens up the day. The king of flavours, Ottolenghi’s taste combinations really are quite extraordinary.

This crispy salad hits you full on with its sharp sweetness and oniony heat, and it’s just what is required to shake up tired tastebuds on a drowsy wintry or early spring night. You will love this one.

Similar dishes include Winter Roast Vegetables with Chickpeas, Fennel and Apple Salad, and Roast Cauliflower, Grape and Cheddar Salad.

You might like to browse other Ottolenghi recipes, or explore other Salads here and here. We have Apple Salads and Celeriac Salads. Check for all other Celeriac recipes, and take some time to explore all of our Early Spring recipes.

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