Salty Battered Broad Bean Pods

Towards the end of the season, broad beans will often grow pods without seeds – the flowers have failed to germinate. I still use these pods – they are great chopped into vegetable fritters or patties, simmered and served with a yoghurt or tomato sauce, or, like today’s recipe, battered and deep fried (SO DELICIOUS). I make a standard batter with plain flour with a little eno or baking soda added to lighten the batter and make it quite crispy.

You don’t have to wait to the end of the broad bean season to make these – they can be made any time you are shelling broad beans. Don’t waste the pods if they are in good condition. If you’ve grown your own beans the pods are likely to be tender during the whole season. If you are buying pods, use your own judgement as to when during the season the pods become too tough. Cut larger pods into smaller pieces.

You will thank me for this recipe, it is delicious, and uses parts of the vegetable usually discarded. Always go for no-waste where possible.

Similar recipes include Rosti with Goat’s Cheese and Chives, Crispy Battered Okra, Crispy Battered Onion Rings, and Pea and Mint Croquettes.

Browse all of our Broad Bean recipes and all of our Snacks. Or explore our Late Spring dishes.

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Palak Bhajiya | Spinach Fritters

Spinach and other greens are some of the easiest things to grow in the garden, so we always have them in abundance. One easy way (and delicious way) to use them is to make this great Indian snack, generally eaten during the Monsoon season. Spinach leaves are coated in a chickpea flour batter and deep fried. So put on your rainy weather gear, pick the palak, and make this bhajiya with lots of friends and lots of laughter. In the UK Bhajiya is called Bhajji (confusingly), and this practice is spreading. We could just call them Pakoda and be done with it.

Similar recipes include Salty Battered Broad Bean Pods, Herb and Walnut Fritters, Pakora – Vegetable Fritters, and Onion Rings.

Please, browse all of our Pakora/ Bhajji, and all of our Snacks. Our Indian dishes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Late Winter dishes.

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The Huge Vine Leaf Pakora | Angoor Patta Pakora

Fresh grape vine leaves are a rarity, unless you have a vine in your yard, or are surrounded by vineyards, or live in an Italian neighbourhood. If you can, grab some fresh ones (more than you need and freeze the rest). We have quite a number of recipes for them. If you can’t find them locally, you can purchase them preserved in water, salt and citric acid. They are available at most gourmet stores or Greek groceries.

In this recipe, the leaves are blanched, drained, finely shredded and folded into a spiced chickpea flour batter. The mixture is then poured into a sauté pan and shallow-fried into a large round cake that is golden brown, crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. It is like making one pakora from the batter. You could of course, make individual pakoras the usual way.

This recipe is adapted from Lord Krishna’s Kitchen, a beautiful book full of Vedic cooking.

Similar recipes include Sizzling Rice Squares, Eggplant and Kale Pakora, Malabar Spinach Pakora, and Crispy Battered Onion Rings.

Browse all of our Vine Leaf recipes and all of our Pakoras. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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Malabar Spinach Pakoda

Malabar Spinach is a thick spinach like leaf that grows on a vine – it is often confused with other greens, but look for leaves that are thick, a little mucilaginous, and are on twining stalks.  It may also have white or purple flowers and seeds on the vine. These leaves are common in India and throughout S. E. Asia. It has various names and may be called Basella Spinach, Poi leaf, Bacchalikura, Vasalakkirai, Basale Soppu, Ceylon spinach, Buffalo spinach, Indian spinach, Red vine spinach, Vine spinach, Upodika and Poi. There are more – Bachali in Andhra, Basale in Kannada, Vaali Bhaji in Konkani, Mayalu in Marathi and Pui Shak in Bengali.

Malabar Spinach is not really a spinach at all, but the taste is similar and it is better suited to summer growing than real spinach.

Similar dishes include Malabar Spinach with Urad Dal, Huge Vine Leaf Pakora, Crispy Fried Potato and Onion Strings, Red Onion and Chilli Pakora, Bhajji, and Okra and Cauliflower Pakora.

Browse all of our Malabar Spinach recipes and Pakora dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Eggplant and Kale Pakora

Pakora are a favourite street food in India, and one that can easily be made at home. Recipes use a chickpea flour batter into which vegetables are dipped and then deep fried. I like to serve these Pakora with sea salt and lemon juice only, but they are commonly eaten with Indian sauces and chutneys.  One word describes them. Delicious. Incredibly delicious. Have a glass of chai with them – I also love them with a small cup of spicy rasam.

In frying the pakora (also called pakoda, bhajji and bhajiya) the aim is to cook the vegetable in the same amount of time that the batter takes to become crispy. It is about temperature, so it is a good idea to test-fry a few pieces before cooking the whole batch.

The types of vegetables that can be used include potatoes, onion rings, eggplant, sweet potatoes, softer pumpkins, lotus root, cauliflower and greens such as spinach, kale and amaranth leaves. Make sure that any greens are really dry before using.

Similar recipes include Curly Kale with Ginger and GarlicMalabar Spinach Pakora, Red Onion and Green Chilli Pakora, Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, and Vegetable Fritters.

Browse all of our Pakoras and all of our Snacks. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Red Onion and Green Chilli Bhajiya

Looking for quick and easy snacks? These Onion Bhajiya are feather light and so more-ish – you had better make quite a few. Heat from the chilli, the beautiful citrusy warmth of the coriander seed and the chickpea flour coating make these a great go-to accompaniment to a strong cuppa Indian tea either morning or afternoon on a cool day.

This is a treasure of Bengal, north of India. The original recipe comes from Christine Mannfield in her collection of Indian recipes Tasting India. I adapted it a little. The beauty of this recipe is that the onions are not coated in a batter, but the chickpea flour is worked into the onions, using its own moisture, to form a delicious crispy light coating.

Have a look at this other style of Onion BhajiEggplant and Kale Pakora, and these Huge Vine Leaf Pakora and  Vegetable Bhaji. Or try this Greek-Indian Tomato Pakoras and Salty Battered Broad Bean Pods.

Other Onion dishes you could try include Confit d’Oignon (Onion Jam), Onion Salad with Sesame Oil, and South Indian Onion Strings Slightly Pickled Salad.

Browse all of our Bhajiya/Pakoras here, or have a look at our Indian Snacks. All of our Onion recipes are here, and Indian dishes are here. Or you might like to explore all of our easy Mid Autumn dishes.

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Okra and Cauliflower Pakora

Are you ready for a snack? Okra and Cauliflower Pakora (Pakoda) will satisfy your deepest longings. Tossed in some chickpea flour batter, with rice flour for crispness, these little beauties are beautiful dunked into some green chutney and eaten on a sunny afternoon, sitting under a tree.

Are you after snack recipes? Try Malabar Spinach Pakora, Eggplant and Kale Pakora, Chickpea Flour Socca, Farinata and Pudla, Paprika Oven Chips, Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, Cumin and Pepper Baked Potato Wedges, Chickpea Fingers with Tomato Salsa, and Paneer Toast.

Or perhaps you are after Okra dishes. Try Huge Vine Leaf Pakora, Quick Okra Raita, Kurkuri Bindi (Crispy Okra), Ladyfingers Recheio (Okra with Chilli-Spice Paste), and Fried Ladyfingers, Goan Style.

Want more information? Read about Okra here, then browse all of our Okra recipes, and all of our Snack recipes. Pakora are here. All of our Indian dishes are here and Indian Essentials here. Or simply explore our easy Early Autumn dishes.

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Domatokeftedes | Santorini Style Tomato “Patties” | Indian Tomato Pakoras

Greek Tomatoes in Batter, a delicious snack

Domatokeftedes are delicious Greek tomatoes in batter, in fact they are similar to Pakoda/Pakora. They are often referred to as fritters or patties, although they don’t always conform to a uniform shape.

Domatokeftedes are a  specialty of Santorini in Greece. They are traditionally made with the island’s native tomato that is grown in the volcanic soil. It does not require watering, and yet the small tomato is sweet and intensely flavoured. This recipe uses any juicy tomato – Roma tomatoes are good. The fritters can be served as a snack or as part of a mezze platter – they are delicious dipped into tzatziki or any yoghurt sauce, sweet chilli sauce, or a herby blended fresh coriander and mint chutney.

This dish is very versatile. And it is such an innovative way to use tomatoes!

Similar recipes include Eggplant and Kale Pakora, Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, and Vegetable Bhajji.

You might also like to explore our Greek recipes, and our Tomato recipes. And have a look at our Pakora dishes and Snack recipes. Check out our easy Late Summer recipes.

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Bhajiya | Pakora | Vegetable Fritters Indian Style

Oh the joys of Bhajji

Oh the joys of Indian snacks, of that (often) deep fried combo of flavours, of the special chutneys and spices, the lip smacking, breath-taking joy that goes on and on and on.

Bhajiya is truly tremendous. I made today’s afternoon nosh with potato, eggplant (brinjal), red capsicum and onion. I thoroughly recommend this, eaten in the sunshine with a cool ale or iced tea, and friends.

It is accompanied with fresh mango cheeks with chaat masala. Bhajiya can be served as breakfast, snacks or as an appetiser. I like to accompany it with diced fruit, a green salad or kachumber.

There are some similar recipes. Try our Herb and Walnut Fritters, Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, Crispy Battered Onion Bhaji, and Okra and Cauliflower Pakora.

Or for snacks, try the Channa Chat with Chat Masala, and Baked Chickpeas.

Browse all of the Bhajiya here and all Indian Snacks here. Or explore our Indian recipes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Or be inspired by our easy Early Summer recipes.

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Pudla and Crispy Battered Onion Rings | Two Recipes using Chickpea Flour

Celebrating Chickpea Flour

I have to say, chickpea flour is the best! So versatile, if I was to be marooned on a desert island, it is one of the pantry ingredients that I would take with me. From the beautiful Farinata, to a stabliser in yoghurt curry, to crispy batters and fritter-like little dosas, it brings joy into the kitchen. Going by different names, you may recognise Chickpea Flour as Besan, or Gram Flour.

Make these two quick recipes in no time at all. They make a lovely sunny breakfast on the terrace – Pudla, Crispy Battered Onion Rings, Lentils, Tomatoes, Curd (yoghurt) and deep fried yoghurt dried chillies. Finish it off with a nice crispy, slightly sour apple.

Pudla is also called Cheela, Puda or Pooda, and there are versions from many parts of India. They are a fairly relaxed form of Dosa.

You might also like to try Chickpea Flour Socca, Farinata and Pudla, Pudla with Green Coriander, Chickpea Flour Pudla, or Chickpea Flour “Cakes” with Tomato Salsa. Or try Okra and Cauliflower Pakora, Onion and Green Chilli Bhajji, and Vegetable Bhajji.

All Pudla recipes are here. And browse our Indian Recipes. Be inspired by our Early Spring recipes.

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