Pickled Watermelon Rind

We don’t often think about the rind of watermelon – do you? This year I have decided to pickle it, to extend our focus on lowering food waste and, as much as possible, using every edible part of a plant.

Pickling watermelon rind is quite easy but does take a couple of non-effort days. I have followed the non-cook approach, although some recipes do simmer the rind before or during pickling.

First the rind, sans the green skin, is salted overnight (soaked in brine), then rinsed and placed in a pickling liquid of vinegar and spices. It is edible after 1 hour, but is better if left a few days. It will keep indefinitely if stored in sterilised jars in the fridge.

In Nopi, Ottolenghi has an approach to pickling the rind which is pretty much the same as most other recipes. He uses the rind in a Watermelon Soup and also in a Watermelon Salad. They both sound delicious.

Similar recipes include Mango and Ginger Pickle, Green Mango Pickle, and Chinese Pickled Cucumber.

Browse all of our Watermelon recipes and all of our Pickles. Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Pickled Watermelon Rind”

Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Pickle without Oil – Salt and Lime Juice style with Spices

Vibrant in colour and tangy in flavour, these are a great addition to salads, soups and other dishes.

It was an exciting time when my first makrut limes ripened – I had quite a crop! Half of them were pickled in a South Indian style pickle, and half of them were pickled using a salt and lime/lemon juice method. It is very easy.

This is an Indian style pickle. We never tire of them, serving them with all Indian dishes, with plain rice or mixed rice, in salads, in dishes being baked, and in any other way we conceive of using them.

Are you looking for pickle recipes? Try Cumquat and Lime Seed Syrup, Easy Pickled Cumquats, Green Mango Pickle, Fresh Green Apple Pickles, Gujarati Carrot Pickle, and Quince Aachar.

Our Indian Pickles are here and all of our Indian recipes are here. Explore our Indian Essentials. And check out our recipes for preserves. Find inspiration in our collection of gorgeous Early Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Pickle without Oil – Salt and Lime Juice style with Spices”

Tamarind Molasses | Tamarind Syrup

Very occasionally I come across some fresh tamarind in our local Asian shops. Sometimes it is ripe, sweet ripe tamarind, dark and luscious to eat. But more often it is green, unripe tamarind. The green tamarind has the most intense sour taste that you can imagine. It is eaten as a snack in India with salt and chilli – a hard but padded surface next to you is essential, to bang your fist on when the tartness fully hits you ūü§£.

I love to capture that tartness, or the essence of it, by making a Tamarind Molasses (aka Tamarind Syrup). While I make this most of all with the green Tamarind pods, the recipe can also be used for ripe pods.

If you wanted to you can even make this from a block of dried Tamarind or some Tamarind Concentrate. See the recipe notes. It won’t be AS good as using pods, but will still be amazing.

Similar Recipes include Pomegranate Molasses and Quince Molasses.

Browse all of our Tamarind dishes. Or browse our easy Early Winter recipes.

Continue reading “Tamarind Molasses | Tamarind Syrup”

Sauce de Tomate | French Tomato Sauce

France is full of sauces. If you are going to categorise French food broadly, you might say – meat, sauce, butter, baked goods. It is pretty accurate – one of my comprehensive books on French cooking contains 2 salads (and some vegetable recipes). To be fair, the salads can be the base for many variations. And to be more than fair, I have spent time working in France so know that there is a large variety of salads. But, yes, meat is the focus.

So, with a love of French food, we pick and choose from amongst the cuisine, and make to our vegetarian style.

This is a beautiful version of a Tomato Sauce – one to add to our many tomato sauces – and, like the others, it freezes very well. Similar to many French recipes, there is a base sauce, beautiful on its own, and a few variations of sauce that can be made with the addition of one or two more ingredients.

Similar dishes include Freeze Tomatoes for Winter, Italian Tomato Sauce, Another Italian Tomato Sauce, and Spiced Tomato Puree.

Browse all of our Sauces, and all of our French recipes. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Sauce de Tomate | French Tomato Sauce”

Quince Molasses

We now have a collection of molasses recipes that we cycle through year-round in our kitchen – pomegranate molasses, tamarind molasses, cumquat “molasses” and quince molasses. They are easy to make and divine with the sweet-sour flavours that can be used in spoon sweets, drizzled over sweet and savoury dishes, and mixed into dressings, soups, bakes and braises. They are essential accompaniments in our kitchen.

Here is the Quince Molasses we’ve been making for some time.

Similar dishes include How to Use Quinces, Quince Molasses and Tahini Dip/Sweet, Turnips with Quince Molasses, and Quince Pickle.

Browse all of our Quince Molasses recipes, and our Molasses recipes (more to come). Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Quince Molasses”

Sweet Quince Mustard | Mostarda Dolce | Quince Relish

Oh the Greeks! How wonderful is their food. This recipe is a mustardy Quince relish where the Quinces are cooked in port or Marsala. It is divine, and we use it when we are making large plates of mezze style food – spreads and dips, pickles, olives, crusty bread, fruits, dried fruits, nuts, charred vegetables, and so forth. Recently we have been using our wonderful Cumquat chutney as part of this plate – a new batch was made late one night after a gift of these small tart globular citrus.

For this year, we had half a quince left after braising some Quince and Leeks yesterday (also very delicious served with our Cumquat Chutney). This is the very last of this year’s buckets of quinces from our good friend. Sadly, the house no longer is permeated with the glorious scent of quince, but our cupboards are full of pickles, chutneys, quince paste, quince leather, quince jam, quince vinegar and quince molasses. Glorious.

So, back to this half quince. It was cooked in Marsala, but sweet port can be used, or a sweet wine like Madrodaphne if you have access to Greek wines. The roots of this type of dish is probably English, but it is now common in parts of Greece. Dried fruits can be used in stead of Quince,or added with the quince.

It is glorious with cheese. Try some of this relish and some Quince Paste, with your favourite cheeses.

Are you after similar recipes? Try Fruit Flavoured Vinegars, Leeks with Quinces, Onion Jam, Caponata, and Red Pepper and Apple Relish.

Browse all of our Relishes, all of our Quince dishes, and all of our Greek recipes. Or enjoy our Late Winter collection of recipes.

Continue reading “Sweet Quince Mustard | Mostarda Dolce | Quince Relish”

Pickled Quince

Quince is a beautiful, fragrant fruit that is definitely underutilised. This is a pickle using Rice Vinegar (although this can be replaced with other vinegars) and some spices. It showcases how beautiful quince can be.

Try these other Quince recipes: Indian Pickled Quinces, Quince Salsa, Afghani Quinces with Split Peas, and Spiced Quinces.

Are you after other interesting pickles? Try Sweet Quince Relish, Jicama Pickle, Pickled Lemons, and Cumquat Pickles. Also try Quince Vinegar and Quince Molasses.

Browse all of our Quince recipes, and all of the Pickle recipes. Or take some time to explore our Mid Winter collection of dishes.

Continue reading “Pickled Quince”

Dried Turmeric Okra | Vendaikai Vathal

Ah Fryums. Dried vegetables that are then fried and served in sambar or kuzhambu, with yoghurt as a pachadi or raita, or as an accompaniment to rice.

To make these Okra Fryums they are soaked in yoghurt for 2 days and then dried. Traditionally they would be dried on rooftops in the hot sun, but as that is not possible here, a dehydrator will substitute. I used Vidhyas Home Cooking as a guide for making these.

Are you after other Vathal? Read this article about them and then try Mango Vathal and this other recipe for Okra Vathal. We also have Dried Mung Dal Nuggets.

Or perhaps other Okra dishes? Try Stir Fried Okra, Baked Okra in Dukkah, Spicy Dried Okra Snack, Pickled Okra, and Goan Fried Okra.

Browse all of our Okra dishes, and all of our Vathal. Have a look at our Autumn Preserving article. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials here. Or simply explore our Early Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Dried Turmeric Okra | Vendaikai Vathal”

Teeny Dried Okra | Okra Vathal | Crispy Okra

There are lots of ways of drying Okra in South India, from the plain – salted and dried, to the curd-soaked okra similar to yoghurt chillies, to okra that is pre-cooked in chilli and tamarind and then dried.

This version partially dries the okra and then blanches them in salt and turmeric (how healthy!) before finishing the drying process. Like all Vathal, the dried okra are fried before use, and can be eaten as snacks, with yoghurt as a pachadi or raita, or included in dishes such as Vatral Kuzhambu.

Traditionally, in India, drying would be done on a roof top terrace in the hottest of suns. I once saw my neighbours put a whole sack of onions out in the sunshine for months to fully dry. Sadly, in other parts of the world, this is not possible. So here, I use a dehydrator with excellent results. You can also dry them in the oven.

Are you after some other Okra recipes? Try Dried Turmeric Okra, Crispy Okra, Okra with Chilli Spice Paste, and Goan Fried Okra. Read more about Okra here.

Or try some of our other Vathal and VadagamDried Mango, Another Method for Dried Okra, and Dried Mung Dal Nuggets.

You can check out all of our Okra dishes, and all of our Vathal and Vadagam. We have a guide to preserving Summer and Autumn fruits and vegetables for Winter. Or simply explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Teeny Dried Okra | Okra Vathal | Crispy Okra”

Fig Jam with Black Pepper, Cinnamon and Ginger

Glen Ewin Estate is a function centre in the Adelaide Hills that is a venue for weddings, conferences and other events. It also has cellar door tastings for small boutique wineries, it features a nice restaurant, and has a small fig orchard or two. In fig season, you can arrange to visit and pick your own figs. It is a lovely activity on a warm Late Summer or Autumn day, for those of us who love to eat and cook with figs. I had a leisurely drive through the hills, always a pleasure, to arrive about 20 minutes prior to their closing time, but that was all that I needed. Armed with enough figs for jam and a weeks worth of eating/cooking, I ambled home again. There is nothing like fresh figs straight from the tree.

The jam I made with the figs is similar to other jams I love to make. I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, so they are generally on the tart side, and are flavoured with spices. So today’s Fig Jam has black pepper, cinnamon, ginger and a hint of chilli, as well as a couple of slurps of some red wine that was sitting, ignored, in the fridge.

Two parts figs. One part sugar. Cook and cook. Be gentle. Bottle.

(I read this recipe a while ago, with a nice story about a Grandmother and her jam making.)

This jam is so easy to make. I make small quantities of jam and keep the jars in the fridge, so am not overly concerned about the fruit-sugar ratio. If you are making large quantities to store for longer periods, please adhere to appropriate fruit-sugar ratios.

Similar recipes include Strawberry and Rhubarb Jam, Quick Strawberry Jam,  Quince Jam, and Crab Apple and Pomegranate Jelly.

Also try Boozy Baked Figs.

Browse all of our Jam recipes and all of our Fig dishes. Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Fig Jam with Black Pepper, Cinnamon and Ginger”