Quinoa and Purslane Salad with Radish and Kalonji

Today’s salad could really be called a Garden Salad, because the radishes and the purslane come from my side garden. Both grew abundantly in our garden this year. It is a salad flavoured with citrus juice and kalonji seed adds crunch and a visual element. You could use black sesame seeds or poppy seeds if you prefer. Kalonji can be found at any Indian grocery store.

Similar recipes include How to Use Purslane in Salads, Ghol Takatli Bhaji, Summery Grain or Lentil Salad, Quinoa Salad with Apricots and Pecans, Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes and Pine Nuts, and Purslane Salad with Tomatoes.

Browse all of our Quinoa Salads, Purslane Salads, and all of our Radish Salads. Or explore our Early Autumn recipes.

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Summery Grain or Lentil Salad

This is a versatile Summer salad. The base can be a grain, dried bean, lentil or even tiny pasta. Indeed you can mix them as well. Use couscous, barley, freekeh, burghul, Israeli couscous, small pasta, horse gram, quinoa, rice, puy lentils, matki beans, butter beans or haricot beans. This is definitely a salad that helps you clean out your pantry – use any grain, lentil or bean that you have available. Today I am using barley mixed with a little tiny pasta.

Just a note about the salad dressing. It uses a curry powder. Either use a good quality one or make your own. My Mother used to make a Curried Rice Salad, and we loved it. This is my take on that salad. Today I have used barley as a base, with a little tiny tubular pasta. It is great alongside an Halloumi Burger and steamed sweetcorn!

Similar dishes include Freekeh and Burghul Pilaf, Quinoa Salad with Orange, Pasta and Couscous Salads, and Parsley, Barley and Feta Salad.

Browse all our very many Salads, and all of our Barley recipes. Or browse our Late Summer dishes.

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Spring Onion and Quinoa Cakes with a Spicy Salbitxada Sauce

Ottolenghi’s Quinoa cakes are originally made with ramps (wild garlic) which are prolific in England and very delicious. However here they are considered a noxious weed and so are not available. Ottolenghi suggests spring onions instead, and it is a good substitution.

It is also a recipe that uses eggs in the original version. As you know if you have been following along with our project of cooking from Plenty More, I  substitute chickpea flour, cream and eno for eggs in suitable recipes. You could add a little ground flaxseed too, for more “stickability” – in fact substituting the bread crumbs for ground flaxseed will make the dish gluten free. The result was still somewhat crumbly so make sure you have enough of the chickpea flour, and also that you squish the mixture together really well when making the patties. (The crumbly bits were very delicious too! See the note after the recipe.)

Ottolenghi makes a wonderful Salbitxada Sauce – a red capsicum and tomato spicy sauce thickened with ground almonds. We’ve had these also with our just-made Cumquat and Mango Chutney (made with Alphonso Mango puree, would you believe). I have included the instructions for the sauce in the recipe below because it is so good, but know that you can use any tomato, red pepper or spicy sauce (home made is best) or chutney.

We also made a Red Pepper and Mustard Seed sauce to go with the left overs. Another great sauce.

As you know, I have been working my way through Plenty More. Never one to keep up with fashion I haven’t joined the people feverishly cooking through Simple. I had intended to finish Plenty More within 12 months but found I had to take a break of some months within sight of the end. I was puffed out! Each of Ottolenghi’s recipes takes time and effort, and I just could not cook another one! Now I have resumed, but I will take it at a slower pace. Even this recipe has 7 (yes, seven) different processes – sauce: roast, blitz, boil, that’s 3, then fritters: cook, mix, fry, bake for a total of 7.

As mentioned, for this recipe, I have made it egg-free by replacing the eggs with a chickpea flour batter. If you prefer the original recipe, check here.

Similar recipes include Crispy Couscous and Saffron Cakes, Quinoa Porridge with Tomatoes, Herb and Walnut Fritters, and  Vegetable Cutlets.

Browse all of our Quinoa recipes and all of our Fritters. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Celeriac and Tart Apple Salad with Poppy Seed

Sometimes when you are making Ottolenghi dishes, when you are rubbing that vinegar and sugar mixture into the onions or the chilli concoction into the cucumbers, massaging gently, when you are cooking the fourth or fifth element for the recipe, you think this is never going to work, why am I bothering? But then you taste the final dish, and you melt, and the flavours are incredible, and it is totally worth the messy kitchen and the washing up.

This is another Ottolenghi salad that brightens up the day. The king of flavours, Ottolenghi’s taste combinations really are quite extraordinary.

This crispy salad hits you full on with its sharp sweetness and oniony heat, and it’s just what is required to shake up tired tastebuds on a drowsy wintry or early spring night. You will love this one.

Similar dishes include Winter Roast Vegetables with Chickpeas, Fennel and Apple Salad, and Roast Cauliflower, Grape and Cheddar Salad.

You might like to browse other Ottolenghi recipes, or explore other Salads here. We have Apple Salads and Celeriac Salads. Check for all other Celeriac recipes, and take some time to explore all of our Early Spring recipes.

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Sweet Quinoa and Oat Congee

Congee, back in the Ming dynasty, was used as a vehicle for medicinal herbs. Even without the herbs, it is such a great vehicle for love, comfort and nourishment. It is comfort food indeed, eaten at any time but especially when one is feeling under the weather, or has stomach trouble. It is also reputed to be suitable for eating when one has a hangover.

Most people think of congee as a rice porridge, but depending on where you lived in Asia, your congee might be made with millet, barley, corn, mung beans or other legumes, mixed with or without rice. Sadly, it is only the South China version made with rice that has become known more universally, probably because it is so creamy and mild. Congee has lots of names across the world too, eg jook (Cantonese, Korean), jok (Thailand), zhou (Mandarin), kanji (Tamil), chao (Vietnamese), canja (Portugese). In Thailand, they mix additional ingredients into the congee, but in China, it is served with toppings and sides.

Congee is a great way to prepare a meal out of nothing. A cup of rice, lentils or grain can be cooked with 8 – 10 cups of water and whatever flavourings are available in the pantry at the time. I prefer to cook congee in a clay pot, easily available from any Chinese store, as it gives a better flavour.

And most of all, congee is a meal that’s all about personal preference. Cook your chosen grain or lentil, for as long as it takes to get your perfect texture, flavour it as you will, and add the toppings that you enjoy. Today’s congee is made with Oats and Quinoa, a delicious combination that is perfect for breakfast or day time snack. Unlike our other congee recipes, it is one that is sweetened with the addition of dried fruit while cooking.

Similar recipes include Congee, Congee with Butternut and Ginger, Rice, Millet and Lentil Congee, Black Glutinous Rice Congee, and Red Rice and Adzuki Bean Congee.

Browse all of our Congee recipes, and all of our Quinoa and Oat dishes. Or explore our Early Spring recipes.

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Quinoa Salad with Apricots and Pecans

This is a lovely quinoa salad with apricots and nuts. You can make it with fresh fruit in summer or beautiful dried fruit (soaked) in Autumn and Winter. It is pretty glorious even if I do say so myself.

Finally, we are on the last leg of a three year journey to cook all of the 101 Salads of Mark Bittman. Just a couple more to go, less than I can count on 2 fingers. The first of the salads was posted in 2015, and first made perhaps 12 months before that, and it has taken all of this time to make, write up and then schedule, each recipe for posting. It took around 3 years of focused salad making to complete.

The first Summer, we probably made around 20 or 25 of the recipes, the second Summer, perhaps another 20. But the difference in the third Summer was twofold – I fell in love with this routine of salad making, and, well, I didn’t want to spend another 2 years on this project. So a very focused effort began in Autumn of 2017.

The funny thing was, making a salad almost every day – around 5 salads a week – changed food in our kitchen. We now look for our daily salad. We think about it and plan it. We enjoy our salad at different times of the day too – sometimes it makes a great snack mid morning or mid afternoon, sometimes it *is* lunch, sometimes a part of our dinner. Leftovers are eaten for supper, or packed for lunch the next day, or eaten for breakfast even (they are that delicious).

We are completing the 101 Salads in at the end of Early Winter of 2017, even though as you are reading this, it is probably well past that date. The salad posts have been scheduled over time so as not to overwhelm our feed with only salads. We were lucky, taking the salads through Autumn into Winter, as Bittman finishes his list with salads that are based on grains – quinoa, barley, couscous, wheat, rice. We loved these grainy ones in the colder weather of Winter.

We made every salad that we could, and converted many others. There were a few that we could not make – once the non-vegetarian items were removed, there was nothing left to make a salad from. Other salads featuring non-veg items, well, we just stripped them out and made the bones of the salad. We thought about tarting them up by substituting other ingredients, but actually we enjoyed the really pared down salads with killer dressings. We did. Simple is good. (Over the top complex is good too, hey Ottolenghi?)

Some salads we changed a little, due to availability of local ingredients, some we added a couple of items – white pepper, for example, to Asian style salads (my absolute love), or something we might have sitting on our kitchen bench that made a good addition. Pickled cumquats made it into a tart quinoa salad, and were divine. Some pickled jicama topped another salad, adding that delightful apple-flavoured crunch. But mostly, we left the original version alone.

And there you have it. Our long, multi-year journey of Salads with Bittman. I hope you like this one, #99 on his list. Please enjoy! Then browse all of our others.

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Quinoa or Couscous Salad with Orange

A beautiful salad with the slightest suggestion of Middle Eastern flavours and mixing the sweet with the savoury. It is a great Winter salad, when oranges ripen and hang soft and juicy on the trees in the back yard.

We have a few Quinoa salads, either published or coming up. I like to make 2 or 3 of them through the week for lunches or to accompany dinner, cooking enough quinoa for the 3 salads at the beginning of the week. It makes life easy!

Are you after similar recipes? Try Saffron Couscous with Apricots and Pumpkin, Moroccan Salad with Radishes, Quinoa Salad with Apricots and Pecans, Light Couscous Salads, and Pumpkin Couscous Salad.

All of our Quinoa recipes are here, and our Couscous recipes here. Try some Orange recipes. Browse all of our many many salads, or just the Bittman Salads that we have cooked. Or explore our Early Winter dishes.

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Quinoa Salad with Parsley, Tomatoes and Pinenuts

Quinoa, once a darling of every food blogger and health-follower-of-fashion is now a little off-trend. Never mind, that never bothered us. We still love it, even though it is not a constant staple item in this pantry.

Let’s remedy that. This is a salad with lots of parsley, juicy tomatoes and crunchy pinenuts. Simple, but it is bound to make you fall in love with Quinoa all over again. The lemon juice is wonderful in this salad, and today I added some chopped cumquat pickles to enhance that tang.

Similar recipes include Quinoa Salad with Apricots and Pecans, Quinoa Salad with Orange, Wild Rice and Quinoa Salad, Quinoa Porridge with Tomatoes, and Quinoa, Lemon and Parsley Salad.

This is a Bittman Salad. We are counting down to finishing making his 101 Salads – all the vegetarian ones, and we modified many of the non-vegetarian ones. Less than 10 left to make.

Browse all of our Bittman Salads here, and all of our Quinoa recipes. Our many many Salads are here. Or simply take some time to browse our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Rice, Wild Rice and Quinoa Salad With Nuts and Barberries

This is one of those recipes that gives Ottolenghi’s recipes a bad wrap – lots of ingredients, but even worse, SIX different cooking processes each with its own pots and pans and utensils to be washed, bench to be cleaned. It better be worth it, I thought. It is not a dish for weeknights. And I recommend washing up the pans as you go, even if you have a dishwasher.

First you cook the wild rice, then the basmati, then the quinoa. While they have to be cooked separately, it can be done simultaneously. Then the nuts are toasted and next the onions are sauteed. Finally, all ingredients come together and are dressed. Tarragon is far too expensive here to buy for one salad, so that is omitted.

This is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area. I made a couple of changes to the recipe. Ottolenghi uses Sour Cherries, but they are difficult to find locally. I use Barberries, which are easily found in Middle Eastern and Afghani groceries. I also use lime or lemon, whichever is on the kitchen bench. Also, I will swap the herbs out for what is available at the time. I like to keep parsley, but sometimes the heat of Summer gets to the basil, so I might use Thai Basil or lemon balm, or other soft, leafy herb. And rocket will get subbed for baby spinach if that is what I have  – I may add a tart element to replace the bite of rocket (e.g. a little raw onion, spring onion, capers, or sour grapes).

Ottolenghi salad recipes are always huge, enough to serve an army. Making a third or half of the recipe is usually enough for four of us. Scale for your own numbers, size of serve, and appetite.  This salad is particularly large, even a half recipe will be great for a BBQ lunch for half an army.

So is this salad worth the work? I rarely say this about Ottolenghi’s dishes, but, no. It’s a good salad, even a great salad. But I prefer to make it when I want to use up left over rice, onions and/or quinoa. I sub the wild rice for chickpeas, as wild rice is a reasonably expensive ingredient. Having said that, it does work as is as a dish for a friend’s lunch or BBQ when you only want 1 large, visually pleasing  salad to accompany the main course.

It is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Herbed Red Rice and Radish Salad, Quinoa Salad with Tomatoes, Parsley and Pinenuts, Not Quite Fried Rice Salad, Sweet Pepper and Rice Salad, and Green Mango and Coconut Rice.

Browse all of our Rice Salads, and all of our Quinoa dishes. Our Ottolenghi recipes are here. Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.

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Quinoa Porridge with Tomatoes and Herb Oil

Quinoa is making its way into our kitchen more and more – it is a delicious grain (actually it is a seed that acts like a grain) and is very easy to cook. This is a recipe that you will love, both for its flavour and its versatility.

In this recipe, Quinoa is cooked much longer than usual until a porridge-like texture is achieved, then it is enriched with butter and feta. It is topped with tomatoes and a herb oil, and the result is satisfying and comforting in a way that will appeal both to lovers of quinoa as well as those still in need of some convincing.

This is an Ottolenghi recipe, a cracker of a dish, from his book Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area, or ones that we already have in our kitchen. For this recipe, Ottolenghi chars some cherry tomatoes. But we have used our own dried tomatoes in oil with some lovely roasted garlic that we had sitting in a fridge. It is divine.

It is Ottolenghi Cook the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note again that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar dishes include Black Glutinous Rice Congee, Sweet Congee with Poached Oranges, Red Rice and Quinoa Salad, and Quinoa, Parsley and White Bean Salad.

Browse all of our Quinoa dishes, and all of our Tomato recipes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

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