French Buttered Radishes with Herbed Salt

Radishes at their most soft and gentle

Growing radishes must be the easiest thing under the sun. They don’t need a lot of attention, and suddenly, they are fully grown and fully flavoursome. Sliced thinly and salted is our favourite way to enjoy them, although they go into  salads and sandwiches too, and sometimes they go into a quick pickle to have with rice or other dishes.

Today, we are treating them French style, cooked in a little butter. This removes the heated tang from the little bulbs, leaving them soft and tender in texture and taste.

Similar recipes include Braised Glazed Radishes, Radish with Coconut Milk, and Slightly Pickled Radish and Cucumber Salad.

You might like to see our other Radish recipes. Our French recipes are here. Or explore our Late Spring collection.

Continue reading “French Buttered Radishes with Herbed Salt”

Braised Glazed Radishes

We don’t often cook radishes, but they can be sautéed or braised easily. Most people prefer them raw, but for a change, braising them can be an exciting alternative.

This recipe braises them with raspberry vinegar or red wine vinegar, with sugar added to make a sticky glaze. It is rather interesting.

My radishes are home grown and quite small this year, so I reduced the cooking times. They are topsy turvy and not uniform in size, and I quite like the variation. We have round ones and long ones.

Are you looking for other Radish recipes? Try these: Jicama, Radish and Green Mango Salad, Slightly Pickled Cucumber and Red Radish Salad, and Spicy Radish with Coconut Milk.

Browse all of our Radish Recipes, and all of our many Salads. You might also like to browse our easy Late Summer Recipes.

Continue reading “Braised Glazed Radishes”

Avocado Smash with Radishes | Spread, Dip or Salad

Sometimes you don’t quite want a guacamole, you want a bit more than smashed avo, and you want to use that ripe avocado, mashed and tasty, to pile onto sourdough toast. Or to use as a salad. Well, here we have that recipe for you.

Are you looking for other Avocado dishes? Try Avocado Salad with Pomelo, Cucumber and Avocado Salad, and Roasted Sweetcorn and Avocado Salad.

Or Radish Salads? Try Wombok and Radish Salad with Peanut Dressing, Radish Salad with Coconut Milk, and Cucumber and Radish Slightly Pickled Salad.

Or perhaps you are looking for other Dips and Spreads? Try Fava Bean Spread with Dill, Roasted Cauliflower and White Bean Puree, Zhug – Coriander Chilli Spread, and Babaganoush.

Browse all of our Avocado dishes and all of our Dips. Or explore all of our Late Autumn collection of recipes. Continue reading “Avocado Smash with Radishes | Spread, Dip or Salad”

Jicama and Green Mango Salad

Crunchy and apple-like in texture and flavour, Jicama makes a wonderful addition to salads. You can cook it, but I love it raw.

This salad combines Jicama with green mango and optionally red or white radish as well. The green mango-chilli-lime component is a great set of flavours commonly found in Mexico and in South East Asia.

Jicama is rarely available here except in the best Asian Groceries and Green Groceries. Its season is Autumn through early spring, so I grab one or two when I see them. These past months I have been lucky enough to locate and exceptional Asian market and they have them regularly.

Are you looking for more Jicama recipes? Try Pickled Jicama, Vegetable Sticks with Spices, Spicy Radish and Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk, and Lightly Pickled Jicama Salad with Citrus.

Or Green Mango recipes? Try Pomelo, Green Mango and Pea Eggplant Salad with Herbs and Tamarind Dressing, Vermicelli and Green Mango Salad, Pomelo and Green Mango Salad, and White Peas and Green Mango Sundal.

You might like to try other Bittman Salads. They include Roasted Red Pepper Salad with Mozzarella and White Beans, Cucumber Salad with Capers and Ricotta, and Fig and Almond Salad.

Are you still looking for more? Browse all of our Salad recipes here, our Green Mango dishes here, and all Jicama Recipes here. All of the Bittman Salads are here. Or explore our Early Spring recipes here.

Continue reading “Jicama and Green Mango Salad”

Pickled Jicama

Jicama is not a cheap vegetable, but boy it is good, and one Jicama will often make 2 or 3 dishes. A couple of salads for example. Or just eat it on its own with salt and lime juice.

The jicama I picked up today from the local Asian Grocery is young and beautiful. It must be the beginning of the Jicama season. Never choose one that is wrinkled, damaged, with mouldy or sunken spots. Ewk!

This recipe is a quickish pickle that will sit in the fridge easily for a week or more. So just adjust the recipe to the amount that you think you will eat in that time.

Try these other Jicama recipes: Jicama and Green Mango Salad, Jicama with Coconut Milk, or Jicama Sticks with Spices.

Are you after other interesting pickles? Try Pickled Lemons, Pickled Quinces, and Cumquat Pickles.

All of our Jicama recipes are here, and all of the Pickle recipes here. Or take some time to explore our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Pickled Jicama”

Glazed 5-Spice Tofu Salad with Cucumbers and Radishes

Goodness, the beautiful salads keep on coming. Summer is made for salads – it is a season where little cooking is required. Thank goodness – all the more time to enjoy the long sunny days, the beautiful weather and of course, the beach.

We have eaten more Tofu on the past 6 months than in the past 6 years, I believe. We have the fabulous close-by S.E. Asian supermarket to blame with its endless variety of tofu, packaged and fresh. It is made into salads, dropped into broths, deep fried, and the flavoured ones eaten as-is quite often for a snack.

Today, we are using Five Spiced Tofu, although smoked tofu could be used if you can find it. Or smoke your own! In this salad, we glaze the tofu in a mixture of orange juice and honey – I have used Barley Malt too, so any sweet, syrupy, honey-like pantry item will be suitable.

Some similar recipes include: Black Pepper Tofu, Tofu and Chilli Salad and Tofu Stacks with Sesame and Spinach. And Tofu with a Peanut Sauce is pretty good too. All of our Tofu Salads are here. We also have other Tofu recipes – they are here.

Radish recipes include Braised, Glazed Radishes, and Wombok and Radish Salad with Peanut Dressing.

Have a look at our Cucumber Salads, Radish Salads, and also our Bittman Salads. Or simply spend some leisurely time browsing our Mid Summer Dishes.

Feel free to browse our other Tofu recipes too. All of our Salads are here.

Continue reading “Glazed 5-Spice Tofu Salad with Cucumbers and Radishes”

How to Cook Vegetables for Sambar

Removing the confusion around cooking vegetables for Sambar

Once you are experienced at cooking sambar, it is quite easy. However, while mastering the skill it can be confusing. Here is some advice on making sambar, and particularly on cooking the vegetables for sambar.

The advice is based on my experience and the writings of S. Meenakshi Ammal who wrote the Cook and See series of books on traditional South Indian cooking.

Browse all of our sambar recipes here. and Meenakshi Ammal’s recipes here.

Continue reading “How to Cook Vegetables for Sambar”

Wombok and Radish Salad with Peanut Dressing | Nappa Cabbage Salad

Easy to make, delicious in taste and healthy as well.

You can’t help but look at this colourful salad and think of roughage, with all that cabbage and crunchy radish. How healthy! This salad is a surprising combination that works extremely well, and a lovely spicy peanut dressing that has many uses beyond this salad.

Are you looking for Cabbage recipes? Try Chilli Cabbage, Simple Cabbage Thoran, and Kimchi.

Similar Radish recipes include Braised, Glazed RadishesGlazed 5-Spice Tofu Salad with Cucumbers and Radishes, and Spicy Radish Salad with Coconut Milk.

You can browse all of our Cabbage Recipes or our extensive collection of Salad recipes. Or you might like to explore our Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Wombok and Radish Salad with Peanut Dressing | Nappa Cabbage Salad”

Jicama, Red Radish and Green Mango Salad

The beautiful flavour combinations of Mexico and SE Asia are found in this salad.

Crunchy and apple-like in texture and flavour, Jicama makes a wonderful addition to salads. You can cook it, but I love it raw.

This salad combines Jicama with green mango and optionally red or white radish as well. The green mango-chilli-lime component is a great set of flavours commonly found in Mexico and in South East Asia.

Jicama is rarely available here. Its season is Autumn through Winter, so I grab one or two when I see them. These past months I have kept a special eye out for them at our Central Market and have been lucky enough to find them on 3 occasions.

Are you looking for similar recipes? You might also like to try these – Vegetable Sticks with Spices, Spicy Radish and Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk, and Lightly Pickled Jicama Salad with Citrus.

Browse all of our Jicama recipes, and our Green Mango dishes. Our Salads are here, and our Radish dishes here, or just browse the Bittman Salads. Alternatively explore our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Jicama, Red Radish and Green Mango Salad”

Spicy Radish or Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk

This salad can be made with white or red radish, jicama (yam bean) or kohlrabi. It is crunchy and delicious and full of spicy tropical flavours.

Crunchy vegetables are just made for summer time lazy eating, and this salad is perfect. In fact it can be made at any time of the year, using red or white radish, kholrabi and/or Jicama. As at least one of these vegetables is in season at most times of the year, there can be no excuse!

Are you looking for similar recipes? You might also enjoy Lightly Pickled Jicama Salad with Citrus, Vegetable Sticks with Spices, and A Host of Spring Salads.

Browse all of our Jicama recipes, and our Radish recipes. Our Salads are here, or just browse the Bittman Salads. Be inspired by our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Spicy Radish or Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk”

Cucumber and Red Radish Slightly Pickled Salad

A perfect and simple tangy salad to make in a hurry. Serve with hot or cold dishes.

With this continuing very hot weather, the only thought is about salads. Here is a simple one with Cucumbers, Red Onion and Red Radish. It is delightful.

Similar recipes include Braised, Glazed Radishes, and Jicama, Radish and Green Mango Salad.

Looking for something different to do with cucumbers? Why not try Simple but Best Cucumber Salad, My Mother’s Tomato and Cucumber Salad, and a Cucumber Curry?

Browse all of our Salad recipes. You might particularly like Pawpaw Salsa, Kachumber – Indian Salad, and Grown up Potato Salad.

Or explore all of the Cucumber Salads, all of the Bittman Salads, and all of the Radish recipes.

Continue reading “Cucumber and Red Radish Slightly Pickled Salad”

Vegetable Sticks with Spices | Kachi Tarkari | Indian Parsi Crudites

Some veg, some spices and some lime juice. A perfect combination for a pre meal snack.

Jicama is a type of yam that is quite gorgeous. It is also called Mexican Yam and is delightful and refreshing when raw – not unlike an apple in texture and flavour.

Just occasionally available in our Central Market, we grab them when we can. The shape is always intriguing. This evening there were Parsi Crudites with salt and spices, featuring Jicama, Green Mango and other vegetables with Celtic Sea Salt, Chilli Powder, Chaat Masala and my Kitchen Bench Podi – mainly home grown curry leaves and chillies at the moment.

Are you looking for other recipes with Chaat Masala? Try Chickpea (Channa) Chaat, Kachumber Salad and Channa Chaat on Kovalam Beach. Also Watermelon Salad, Borlotti Bean Chaat, and Chickpeas and Young Ginger Salad.

Would you like to try other Green Mango recipes? Try Pomelo, Green Mango and Pea Eggplant Salad with Herbs and Tamarind Dressing, Vermicelli and Green Mango Salad, and Pomelo and Green Mango Salad.

Are you looking for more Jicama recipes? Try Pickled Jicama, Spicy Radish and Jicama Salad with Coconut Milk, and A Host of Spring Salads.

Browse all of our Jicama recipes, Green Mango dishes, and all of our snacks. Or explore our collection of Early Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Vegetable Sticks with Spices | Kachi Tarkari | Indian Parsi Crudites”

Classic Seasoned Sambar, Method Four

This is the fourth of four methods that Ms Ammal presents for her basic sambars.

Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See Part 1 has four methods for cooking basic, classic seasoned sambar. This is the fourth method that she describes for that dish.

There are other types of sambar – Yoghurt and Buttermilk sambars, kuzhambu and others that stray from the classic approach. This recipe sticks to that classic, seasoned approach.

Are you wondering what defines a sambar? You might like to read this post that answers that question. If you like to explore sambars, you could browse all sambar recipes, kuzhambu recipes, and these helpful posts – Sambar, Method One, Method Three, and Method Four.

For how to cook vegetables for sambar, read On cooking Vegetables for Sambar. For making sambar powders, go to Sambar Powders and a Simple Sambar. Finally this one will also help –  Sambar – hot, sour or salty?. A lot of info for a simple dish:)

You can see the other methods here – Method 1, Method 2, Method 3. Continue reading “Classic Seasoned Sambar, Method Four”

Classic Seasoned Sambar, Method Three

This is the third of four main ways of cooking sambar.

We have four main methods of cooking Sambar, and this one is the third. The difference in this method  from previous ones is that a delicious paste of chillies, coriander and channa dal is made, instead of using dry spices.

Are you wondering what defines a sambar? You might like to read this post that answers that question. If you like to explore sambars, you can browse these helpful posts – Sambar Method One, Method Two, and Method Four, and then all sambar recipes and kuzhambu recipes.

A lot of info for a simple dish:)

This recipe is different to Methods One and Two in that it introduces a lovely paste as a part substitute for individual spices.

Are you looking for other Sambar recipes? Try Sundakkai Sambar, and Moru Sambar.

Browse all of our Sambar and Kuzhambu dishes, and all of our Indian recipes. Or eat seasonally and explore our collection of Early Spring dishes.

Onion Sambar II

Seasoned Sambar Method THREE a la S. Meenakshi Ammal

Source : adapted from Method Three, Seasoned Sambar in Cook and See Part 1, by S. Meenakshi Ammal
Cuisine: South Indian
Prep time: 15 mins or so
Cooking time: 30 mins + time of cooking the toor dal (about 1.5 hrs)
Serves: 4 people

ingredients
0.5 cup Red Gram Dal = Toor Dal
1 large Tblspn Tamarind
1 tspn salt or to taste
0.5 tspn rice flour or chickpea flour
6 dried red chillies, depending on heat and your preference. I use 3 or 4.
0.5 tspn fenugreek seeds
0.5 tspn black mustard seeds
3 tspn Gingelly Oil = Indian Sesame Oil (a very light sesame oil without a sesame taste. Use ghee or vegetable oil if you can’t get Indian Sesame Oil)
2 Green chillies
1 pinch asafoetida
6 or so curry leaves
coriander leaves
0.33 tspn Turmeric powder
1 cup chopped vegetable (see below)

for chilli paste
6 dried red chillies
1.5 tspns coriander seeds
1 tspn bengal gram (channa dal)

for vegetables
Vegetables like carrot, pumpkin, french beans, runner beans, cluster beans, eggplant, okra, chow chow and drumstick can be used.  It is best to use only one vegetable. Prepare the vegetable by washing and cutting into chunks or lengths. ADD THESE VEGETABLES WHEN THE TAMARIND IS ADDED.

If you prefer, you can briefly par-boil any harder vegetables, like eggplant, okra, pumpkin or any of the beans before using in the recipe. ADD THESE VEGETABLES BEFORE ADDING THE TAMARIND.

You can also use Amaranth stems, radish, white radish or onions, which can be par-boiled in a little water along with the tamarind water before adding to the recipe AT THE POINT THE TAMARIND IS USUALLY ADDED. (Add the cooking water as well). Don’t add extra tamarind to the recipe.

Or Amaranth stems, radish, runner beans, cluster beans or pumpkin can be cooked separately with a little salt, drained an ADDED AFTER ADDING THE TAMARIND.

 

method
Wash the dal. Boil about 4 cups water, add the dal and 1 tspn gingelly oil or ghee. Cover with a lid and cook until a soft mass. Add more water as it cooks if needed. It will take at least 30 mins and up to 90 mins to cook until very soft, depending on the age of the dal.

Towards the end of cooking, add the turmeric powder.

Make the paste. Shallow fry 6 dried red chillies or to taste, coriander seeds and bengal gram in a little ghee. Grind to a paste in a spice grinder or small processor.

Get ready the remaining 6 dried red chillies. Take a small pan and heat with the remainder of the gingelly oil or ghee. Break the dried chillies in half and add to the oil with the mustard seeds first, then the fenugreek seeds and asafoetida. Allow the mustard seeds to pop and fry the seeds till they are a dark brown but not burnt.

Slit the green chillies into 2 and add to the spices with the curry leaves. The curry leaves will splatter so stand back!

Check when your vegetables should be added to the sambar – either now, with the next step or after the next step.

Strain the tamarind water, removing the seeds and strings and keeping the pulp, and add to the spices with the salt.

By now the vegetables are added, so add enough cooking water to make a soupy consistency. Stir, cover and cook on medium-low heat until the vegetables are cooked.

Now add the spices, the chilli paste and vegetables to the dal and mix very well. Allow the sambar to boil well for 3 or 4 minutes.

Mix the rice flour or chickpea flour in some water, mixing well to remove lumps. Stir into the dal, mixing it well. Boil again for a few minutes. Remove from the stove.

Once off the heat, garnish with coriander leaves and curry leaves.

Sambar

 

recipe notes
Grated coconut can be roasted to a golden brown and added to the spice paste, but the keeping properties of the Sambar might be reduced.

Always consider the heat and size of your chillies (dried for red and fresh for green) when selecting how many you will use in the recipe. If the chillies are large, reduce to 4 for the spice paste and 4 for the sambar.

I like to add 2 tomatoes, chopped well, with the vegetables.

Green chillies are optional and may be replaced by red chillies.

If you use more toor dal than specified, the sambar will be thick enough without the need for rice flour or chickpea flour.

If masalas are liked, saute in ghee or gingelly oil: 1 tspn poppy seeds, 0.5 tspn anise, 2 cm cinnamon stick, 4 cloves and 4 cardamon pods, and add for extra flavour to the sambar.

A Classic Seasoned Sambar, Method Two

I adore sambar. There are no two ways around it. It is a dish of choice, and when I visit my most favourite Indian restaurants, I will always order a dish of sambar and idli. As homely as it is, it is comforting, flavoursome, awesome.

This is a second method of cooking Sambar as described by Meenakshi Ammal, that classical Indian author of cookbooks. It introduces the use of Sambar Powder as a replacement for some of the individual spices.

Are you wondering what defines a sambar? You might like to read this post that answers that question. If you like to explore sambars, you could browse these helpful posts – Sambar, Method One, Method Three, and Method Four, and then all sambar recipes and kuzhambu recipes.

A lot of info for a simple dish 🙂

Continue reading “A Classic Seasoned Sambar, Method Two”