Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)

Here is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one is another using lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. It is often prepared as a dish for people who are or have been ill – no tamarind, mustard seeds or chillies. Instead, curry leaves are sautΓ©ed in ghee and added to the rasam with coriander leaves.

There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the fourth of her methods. The delight of providing multiple ways of making one dish is (if you love to explore the subtleties of flavour, as I do), you can make them side by side and examine their tastes.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

See all of the Lime Rasam dishes here.

Similar recipes include Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Rasam with Curry Leaves – Perfect if you are Ailing or Recuperating (and for everyone else too)”

Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder

Today there is another Rasam to add to our series exploring the different types of Rasam. This one has a slight toor dal base, uses sambar powder, and uses lime juice for a tangy, digestion promoting, delicious dish. There are four different ways of making Lime Rasam, according to the Queen of Tamil Food, Meenakshi Ammal. This is the second of her methods.

We are pursuing the Rasams Chapter in Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See as they are traditional Tamil recipes. Although we are not afraid to step away from the tree, going back to very traditional recipes (that can still be made in the modern kitchen) is an important way to get the hang of traditional as well as modern methods and flavour combinations. I hope you feel the same.

Similar recipes include Rasam with Curry Leaves, Mysore Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Early Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Lime Rasam – easy with Rasam Powder”

Garlic Rasam

The health benefits of garlic in the diet are well known. Pair garlic with Long Pepper and you have an immune boosting rasam. Long Pepper is well known in Ayurveda to have multiple health benefits. It also is known by numerous names in India – Pippali, Thippili, Kandathippilis, Desavaram.

This rasam is flavoured with the Pippali and Garlic, as well as black pepper, cumin seeds, chilli and curry leaves. With such layerings of flavours, how could it not be delicious?

Are you interested in other Rasams? Try Lime Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, Kottu Rasam, and another version of Garlic Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Garlic Rasam”

Kandathippilli Rasam | Rasam with Long Pepper

Years ago, an ayurvedic doctor, Prof. Dr Kulkani, would come from Pune in India to Sydney to deliver courses on Ayurveda. I wasn’t a practitioner, just interested, and would attend as many of these as I could. He would talk about Pippalli (aka Thippalli) a lot, a powerhouse spice with many health giving properties. It impacted me so much that I usually keep some at home. In English it is known as Long Pepper and is grown and used in Indonesia as well. It has a peppery, interesting flavour, and has many culinary as well as medical uses.

Meenakshi Ammal has a rasam that uses not only the Long Pepper (Kandathippilli or Desavaram) but also Arisithippili (rather like pieces of root or stem). These add a special flavour to the rasam. I can’t always get Arisithippilli, so I omit it when not available.

This rasam is flavoured with the Thippilli peppers, black pepper, cumin seeds, chilli and curry leaves. With such layerings of flavours, how can it help but be delicious?

Are you interested in other Rasams? Try Garlic Rasam, Tomato Indian Rasam Style, Kottu Rasam, and Garlic Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Kandathippilli Rasam | Rasam with Long Pepper”

Brinjal Rasam | Eggplant Rasam | and Eggplant Rasam with Rosewater

Brinjal Rasam is a type of Mysore Rasam, but with eggplant added. It is a delightful combination – whether in sambar or Rasam, toor dal and eggplant are a match made in heaven. It is another recipe from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See.

One of the interesting notes that Ammal Auntie makes in Mysore Rasam is that the addition of Rose petals (or rose water) to Mysore Rasam (the second method) brings out the flavour and provides a nice rose scent. She is right! If you are going to try this, best leave out the asafoetida. The rose water has a tang of its own, and it tames some of the rasam’s spiciness. The scent is certainly there and it is not unpleasant, as strange as it may seem. It does go well with the eggplant.

Continue reading “Brinjal Rasam | Eggplant Rasam | and Eggplant Rasam with Rosewater”

Easy Tomato Pepper Rasam

Sometimes, particularly when cooking large batches of dishes, we skip corners and the steps that enhance the complexity and sophistication of the dish go by the wayside. And this is Ok – it still tastes jolly amazing.

This rasam is in that category. The recipe is for 2’ish cups (four small serves or 2 large ones), but it can be scaled up. This is the way that rasam is often cooked when 30 or so people need to be fed, and in our house, it might be made this way when it is 15 mins to dinner time and we just need to get it on the table.

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Mysore Rasam | Second Method

This is our second version of Mysore Rasam from Meenakshi Ammal. It varies slightly from the first version, but as we know with Indian cooking small changes can make significant taste differences.

Mysore Rasam is similar to Kottu (Plain) Rasam, in that it includes toor dal to give the rasam a beautiful silky texture. It also uses the water from cooking the dal to round out the flavours. It is also rather like Plain Dal Rasam with different spices. And in this recipe, rasam powder is not used, rather the spices are sauteed and ground while the toor dal cooks.

You might also be interested in reading about the difference between Rasam and Sambar.

Similar recipes include Eggplant Rasam, Easy Tomato Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, Spicy Tomato and Dal Soup, and Pepper Rasam.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Mysore Rasam | Second Method”

Kottu Rasam | Plain Simple Rasam | Third Method

This recipe is another from Meenakshi Ammal’s books Cook and See. It is a plain rasam, very simple and quick to make as it does not contain any significant amount of toor dal. She has three methods for making this rasam, each one treats the 1 teaspoon of toor dal that it does contain, in a different way. This is Method 3. Method 1 is here, and Method 2 is here. They are all very similar, but the taste and texture difference is subtle but noticeable.

This rasam may be simple and quick but it does not lose anything in flavour. It is amazing – tangy, spicy, and the taste of coriander complimenting the rasam. Make double the recipe, you might need seconds.

Just a note on Rasam powder – if you are going to make your rasam powder fresh for this recipe, make one without much toor dal. But, really, if you have some already made or purchased, it will still work well, so use whichever type you have. Even Sambar Powder will be Ok.

Are you interested in other Rasams? TryΒ Mysore Rasam, Tomato Lentil Rasam, Tulsi Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, and Pepper Rasam.

You might also be interested in the following articles:

Our simply explore all of our Rasam recipes. Our Indian recipes are here and Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Kottu Rasam | Plain Simple Rasam | Third Method”

Drumstick Rasam

Drumstick Rasam is extra tasty and can be made either with pieces of drumstick (a vegetable from South India), or if your drumstick is well grown but tender, the pulp can be scraped from the inside and added to the rasam. It is very delicious! I have to admit that I adore drumsticks.

The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes.You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

You might also be interested in reading about the difference between Rasam and Sambar.

Similar recipes includeΒ Drumstick Sambar with Lime, Eggplant Rasam, Mysore Rasam, Kottu Rasam, Cumquat Rasam, Spicy Tomato and Dal Soup, and Pepper Rasam.

Browse all of our Rasam recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Or take some time to browse our Late Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Drumstick Rasam”

Gentle Tomato and Dal Rasam | Indian Tomato Pepper Broth

Rasams, the ubiquitous Tamil dish, have traditionally played the role of stimulating the appetite, aiding digestion and balancing the body’s health with the spices used Not a pre-cursor to meals as in the Western sense, Rasams are drank with the rest of the meal, tipped over rice and/or used to moisten drier curries.

As the Indian cuisine globalises, some less spicy rasams are becoming more popular. These dishes can be eaten Western style (as soup), or in the traditional Indian style (with rice). They are not the Indian Soups in the true sense, they still sit squarely under the Rasam category, but perhaps are a little less spicy.

This Rasam is peppery, rather than chilli-hot. It is strongly tomato-flavoured, and is definitely a wonderful dish. Enjoy it by the small bowlful as a soup, or as a gentle rasam in the traditional way.

Are you after other Rasams? TryΒ Lime Rasam, Drumstick Rasam, Kottu Rasam, Garlic Rasam, and Pepper Rasam. A different Tomato Lentil Rasam can be found here.

Have a look at our Indian Soups as well. Try South Indian Beetroot Soup, Creamy Indian Tomato Soup, and South Indian Cauliflower Soup.

Browse all of our Rasams, all Indian Soups, and indeed, all of our Indian recipes. Indian Essentials are here. tOr explore our Late Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Gentle Tomato and Dal Rasam | Indian Tomato Pepper Broth”