Mung Sprout and Edamame Salad

Sometimes I prepare to post a recipe and realise that it is for an ingredient that does not feature often in our collection of recipes over 12 years of posting on this blog (including some recipes from our blog that ran from 1995 to 2006). It is a surprise to find an ingredient not covered much in all of that time.

We do use Indian-style sprouts in some recipes – that is, the type of sprouts that are only just sprouted, with small little tails. But Mung Sprouts with long tails, Chinese style, feature hardly at all! So today we begin to remedy that.

The recipe is from Ottolenghi’s Plenty More and takes long Mung Sprouts and pairs them with, of all things, Umeboshi puree, edamame beans and radishes!! It really works, and is a terrific combination. This recipe is part of our project to cook more dishes from our Ottolenghi collection of books, and we are beginning with Plenty More.

The salty-sour Umeboshi puree, made from pickled plums, can be found in the Japanese section of larger supermarkets, in Japanese groceries and in health shops. If you can’t find Umeboshi puree, substitute pomegranate molasses.

Make more of the dressing, if you want: it’s so tangy and good that you’ll be tempted to douse this salad; failing that, it’ll keep in the fridge for other dishes in the days ahead.

Similar recipes include Mushroom and Carrot Salad with Sprouts, Bean Sprout Stir Fry, and How to Grow Sprouts.

Browse all of our Sprouts recipes and all of our recipes from Plenty More. Our Ottolenghi dishes are here.

Continue reading “Mung Sprout and Edamame Salad”

Advertisements

Fennel and Quinoa Salad with Broad Beans

Time to get back to Quinoa – we cook with rice, bulgar, barley, lentils, beans, …., but Quinoa doesn’t often feature at our table. This salad helps to rebalance that dynamic.

It is a wonderful Wintery dish using fennel. It is the sort of dish that can form a lovely lunch or supper on a cold day. I always miss fennel in the Summer, and when it appears in shops again in late Autumn our excitement is evident.

The fennel is paired with Fava Beans (Broad Beans). Use fresh ones in the beginning of Spring when fennel is still available, or use frozen ones in Autumn and Winter. The best frozen Broad Beans are found in Middle Eastern shops – they are already peeled! Such a time saver. The fennel and beans are mixed with quinoa, spices and herbs. Don’t hold back on the black pepper, it really enhances this dish.

The recipe is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area.

It is Ottolenghi day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish all the latest posts of recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Red Rice and Quinoa with Orange and Pistachios, Quinoa, Parsley and Lemon Salad, and Fennel Salad with Orange Vinaigrette.

Browse our Fennel recipes and all of our Quinoa dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Fennel and Quinoa Salad with Broad Beans”

Broad Beans with Lemon and Coriander | A Mezze Dish

Broad beans are so good it is not worth going without them even when their short Spring season is over. Frozen broad beans are great substitutes for fresh – search for them in Middle Eastern and Afghan shops as they sell beans that are already peeled. Phew! It saves quite a lot of work.

This dish is a great mezza plate. The combination of coriander and the beans is divine, and imagine this dish with some falafel and hummus. Glorious!

It’s an Ottolenghi recipe, from his book Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area or in our kitchen. For this dish we stuck pretty close to the recipe.

In fact, Ottolenghi’s recipe is a take on an original old Jewish recipe from Aleppo, Syria, which is strongly flavoured with coriander powder. Ottolenghi swaps this out for paprika and allspice. I will post the original recipes soon, and update with a link here.

In fact it is Ottolenghi Cook the Booksday on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note again that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar recipes include Broad Bean and Dill Rice, Broad Bean Puree with Chilli Oil, and Broad Bean Mezze.

Browse all of our Broad Bean recipes and our Mezze dishes. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Broad Beans with Lemon and Coriander | A Mezze Dish”

Tulsi Karha | Tulsi Tea with Spices

Winter comes, and the rains too,  and colds and flu inevitably do the rounds. In India it is the monsoon time that is the worst. Luckily there are a range of drinks – chais and infusions – that at least alleviate the symptoms, and perhaps even shorten the length of the suffering.

A Karha, or Kadha, is an Ayurvedic drink made with herbs and spices that are simmered in water to extract their benefits. Karha are generally made with whole spices, herbs and other ingredients found in all Indian households, so they are inexpensive ways to strengthen immunity and fight infections.

One such herb is Tulsi, or Indian Holy Basil. It is a powerful herb in many respects. We have a number of recipes that make use of the properties of Tulsi.

In this recipe it is combined with the classic trio of spices called CCF – cumin, coriander and fennel, and it adds some cloves and cardamom as well. I know you will enjoy it, and it will help your cold if you have one. It also makes you feel incredibly warm and toasty. May you get well soon.

Similar recipes include Tulsi, Mint and Lemon Verbena Tea, Tulsi Rasam, Ginger and Tulsi Tea.

Browse all of our Chai recipes and all of our Indian drinks. All of our Indian recipes are here, and the Indian Essentials Series is here. Or explore our Early Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Tulsi Karha | Tulsi Tea with Spices”

Cauliflower “Shawarma” with Pomegranate and Tahini

Cauliflower has been used for ages as a vegetarian answer to the classic Middle Eastern Shawarma recipe. The cauliflower is roasted with a range of spices including toasted cumin and coriander, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, and sumac. In this recipe, the cauliflower is then dressed with tahini, pomegranates, pine nuts and rose petals. Beautiful Middle Eastern flavours.

This particular recipe, they say, originally came from Josh Katz of Berber and Q, and it is such a beautiful dish. It has sweetness, tartness, creaminess, ‘burntness’ (umami), warmness from the spices and a fragrance that brings the bazaars of the Middle East to your table. Its such a great dish.

Are you looking for Cauliflower recipes? Try South Indian Cauliflower Soup, Cauliflower Kitchari and Slow Cooked Cauliflower with Lime and Spices.

Or some Middle Eastern recipes? Try Rice and Orzo, Saffron and Rose Scented Aubergines, and Semi Dried Tomatoes with Pomegranate Molasses.

You can also browse all of our Cauliflower Recipes, all of our Middle Eastern Recipes and all of our Pomegranate dishes. Or take some time to check out our Mid Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Cauliflower “Shawarma” with Pomegranate and Tahini”

Paprika Oven Chips

One of our favourite things to do with potatoes is to cut them into wedges, coat them in cumin powder, black pepper and oil, and bake until crispy. Ottolenghi has a variation on that theme in his book Nopi which are equally delicious. They are easy to make, a Friday night delight if you make a large plate of them. Munch in front of a streamed movie, perhaps with a salad, or some salsa verde. Of course they also go very well with any main dish or Summer lunch. Under the gum tree. Or just with some yoghurt or even pickle as a snack. Any which way.

These chips are SO amazing, if you haven’t made them yet, put them on the list for this week.

Similar dishes include Salt and Vinegar Kale ChipsCumin and Black Pepper Potato Wedges, and Sweet Potato Wedges with Lemongrass Creme Fraiche.

Browse all of our Potato recipes, and all of our Ottolenghi dishes. Or explore our Mid Summer collection of recipes.

Continue reading “Paprika Oven Chips”

Pomegranate Raita

We’ve come a long way in Australia, foodwise, in the past decade or two. Not far enough – we have lost the wide variety in each vegetable, and do not yet have proper labelling of variety, growers and location. But when it comes to pomegranates we do have edible ones now! Thank goodness! When I first brought them into our kitchen the only locally available pomegranates here were sour and hard to the point of being inedible. It was after a beautiful road trip in India, eating pomegranates in Kerela with every breakfast (piled onto my plate).  Now, edible varieties are commonly available, frozen kernels are stocked by supermarkets (with all the dangers of eating mass processed frozen foods, sadly), and this year a tree will grace our garden.

Locally, I find 2 types of pomegranate – the usual bright red one with bright red kernel, and a larger pomegranate with a pink skin and paler kernels. Both are great.

Pomegranate kernels are perfect garnishes for almost anything Middle Eastern, much North Indian food, and any salad. They turn an Ok salad into something instagram-worthy.

Today, we make a Raita, a glorious use of both pomegranate kernels and yoghurt. Serve as you might any salad, with any Indian meal, or just with Indian flatbreads or a little rice.

Similar recipes include Asparagus Raita, Pomelo Raita, Carrot Raita, and Okra Raita.

Wondering what to do with your pomegranates? Here is how to extract pomegranate juice, and use it to make Pomegranate Honey, Pomegranate Vinegar and Pomegranate Molasses.

Browse all of our Pomegranate dishes and our Raitas and Pachadis. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Mid Autumn dishes.
Continue reading “Pomegranate Raita”

Apple and Grape Salad with Spices

Salads adjust to the season. As Autumn slowly slips past, fruits change – apples arrive, pomegranates too, some pears. Summer fruits are all gone now, but some melons remain. And how wonderful that all of these are great in salads.

Today we pair grapes and apples for a sweet crunchy salad that is delightful with an Autumn meal.

Are you after other Apple Salads? Try Fennel and Apple Salad and an Autumn Fruit Salad.

What about Grape dishes? Try Black Grape Lassi and Roasted Grapes.

You can browse all of our Salads here, and all of our Apple dishes here. We have some Grape dishes too. Or take some time to browse our Mid Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Apple and Grape Salad with Spices”

Radish Salad with Soy and Sesame

A quick salad you can toss together, for one person or for a multitude. A salad with a lovely little bite from the radishes, softened with the coriander and sesame.

We love a salad each day, and some are as simple as this one. But simple does not mean flavourless. Once you commit to a salad a day, it is quite outstanding the combinations you can come up with. Radishes are perfect for a whole range of salads, and they are so easy to grow in your garden.

Are you looking for other Radish dishes? Try Radish and Green Mango Salad, Tofu Salad with Radishes, and Wombok Salad with Radishes and Peanut Dressing.

Or other types of Salads? Try Quick Tomato Salad with Mustardy Mayo, Chickpea “Tabbouleh”, and Hot Roasted Carrot Salad.

You can also explore all of our Bittman Salads, or the complete set of Salads (there are a lot). Try all of our Radish dishes, or simple explore our Mid Autumn recipes. Enjoy!

Continue reading “Radish Salad with Soy and Sesame”

Persian Barberry Saffron Rice with Almonds and Pistachios

We are so in love with our long stranded saffron from Saffron Only. With our delivery we also received several recipe cards including the recipe for this rice dish which has also been mentioned by an Irani work colleague. As beautiful soft barberries are available at the local Afghan shop, the recipe was added to our must-cook list.

The recipe simmers long grained rice until al dente, then steams it on a bed of potatoes or pita bread (optional) until the bottom is crispy and the rice is perfectly cooked. It is then served with saffron water, the toasted barberries, almonds and pistachios.

Berberis, commonly known as barberry, is a large shrub that has yellow flowers and red or blue-black berries. The berries, rich in vitamin C, have a distinct sharp acid flavour. The country in which they are used the most is Iran where they are used in rice pilafs.. Due to their inherent sour flavor, they are often cooked with sugar before being added to rice. Iranian markets sell barberry dried. In Russia they are sometimes used in jams and extract from them is a common flavouring for soft drinks and candies/sweets. They are rarely used in Europe in modern times. (Thanks wikipedia.)

I notice that Ottolenghi has a similar recipe on his website. I mention it only as we have an Ottolenghi Project happening, cooking from his book Plenty More. You can check his recipe out, but I like this one better. 🙂

Barberries are also such a beautiful colour that they make a great garnish to any rice dish or salad.

Similar recipes include Saffron Mograbieh Pilaf, Saffron, Date and Almond Rice, and Golden Saffron Tea.

Browse all of our Saffron dishes and all of our Persian recipes. Our Middle Eastern dishes are here. Or explore our Mid Summer dishes.
Continue reading “Persian Barberry Saffron Rice with Almonds and Pistachios”

Creamy Mushroom Soup

Who doesn’t have a love for mushrooms, so divine and surprising in taste and texture? Mushroom soup is especially good, creamy and buttery, and it’s even better on a cold night. Nothing beats it.

Come Mid Autumn, that longing for more warming dishes arrives all of a sudden. One day you are eating cucumber salads and the next day it is rice pudding, risotto and soup. You look outside and the delicious yellow light of Autumn has arrived, bringing its long shadow and the rays of light that play amongst gaps and in-between leaves. And all of a sudden your pantry fills with barley and beans and lentils. Ah yes, Summer is well gone, and Winter cometh. Here we are, twixt and between.

And it is so good. This is one of our first soups of the season this year, and it is this retro recipe, still good in it’s simplicity. Let’s face it though, mushroom soup is never pretty in its brown-ness. So don’t forget to brighten it up with lots of chopped parsley and sprinklings of black pepper.

Are you looking for Mushroom recipes? Try Hot and Sour Soup, Mushroom, Spinach and Blue Cheese Salad, Mushrooms for Toast, Adzuki Beans with Rice and Shiitake Mushrooms.

Or are you seeking some Soup dishes? Try Turnip Soup with Yoghurt and Coriander-Walnut Paste, White Bean Soup, Hungarian Mushroom Soup, Mung Bean Soup with Spinach and Cumin, and Cauliflower Walnut Cream Soup.

Why not browse all of our Mushroom recipes? Or or all of our Soup recipes. Or check out our easy Mid Autumn recipes.

Also, explore recipes from our Retro Recipes series, vegetarian recipes from our first blog from 1995 – 2006.

Continue reading “Creamy Mushroom Soup”

Apples with Lemon and Cinnamon

Elizabeth David’s books should be compulsory reading for every person who enjoys cooking. They are reminders that food can be simple, and yet stunningly delicious. It is so important in today’s world of Ottolenghi-like complex recipes. Of course I love Ottolenghi dishes, but how good it is to be able to put a dish together quickly and simply, rather than spending an hour or so on just one dish.

This is from Liz’s book An Omelette and a Glass of Wine and it is a simple apple dessert. Cooked in a syrup, it is a rare use of sugar on this blog. Our desserts are rare. But at least once per year, we have to cook some apples.

Similar recipes include An Autumn Fruit Salad, Butter Glazed Apples, and Baked Apples with Star Anise.

Browse all of our Apple recipes and all of our Elizabeth David dishes. Or explore our Mid Spring recipes.

Continue reading “Apples with Lemon and Cinnamon”

Broad Bean and Dill Rice

Sometimes we just need to throw something together quickly. This is your recipe for a rice side dish, or a snack if you will – ideal for Spring time when young broad beans are around, or at other times using frozen, peeled broad beans from your Middle Eastern of Afghani Grocer. Grab your dill from there too – they have simply the best, largest, freshest bunches of dill, far better than the limp branch or two we get from Supermarkets. (If you buy your frozen broad beans from the supermarket, it is likely that you will have to peel the individual beans once they are blanched. The ones from a Middle Eastern shop will save you quite a bit of time.)

Similar dishes include Black Pepper and Cumin Rice, Persian Barberry Saffron Rice, Saffron, Date and Almond Rice, Kosheri, and Zucchini Rice.

Browse all of our Rice dishes and all of our Middle Eastern recipes. Or explore our Late Summer dishes.

Continue reading “Broad Bean and Dill Rice”

Bucatini con Zucchini | Bucatini with Zucchini

Bucatini are the long hollow pasta noodles, like slightly thicker spaghetti but with a hole though the middle that helps it cook in reasonable time. They are really delicious. I grabbed some zucchini from the garden and char grilled them to make this simple but delicious pasta dish for a week day lunch with a friend. It is a simple recipe that allows the taste of the cheeses to shine through. Gorgeous.

Similar recipes include Bucatini with a Raw Tomato Sauce, Marinated Zucchini Gratin, and Pasta with Zucchini and Pesto.

Browse all of our pasta dishes and all of our Zucchini recipes. Our Italian dishes are here.  Or explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Bucatini con Zucchini | Bucatini with Zucchini”

Kurkuri Bhindi | Crispy Spicy Fried Okra

This recipe is a variation of this other Kurkuri Bhindi recipe. Instead of carefully removing the seeds, this time the seeds are left in place, and the okra are halved or quartered rather than carefully splintered.

In this Rajasthani recipe, the okra slices are marinated in spices and, just before frying, are coated in chickpea flour and rice flour. The flours form a self-battered coating on the okra. After frying, they are a crispy snack that can be eaten with a meal or any time that you have the munchies.

Are you interested in Okra recipes? Read more about Okra here. And try Teeny Dried Okra Vathal, Crispy Okra in Yoghurt, Salad of Charred Okra with Tomato, Ladyfingers Recheio, Avial, and Spicy Dried Okra.

Or are you looking for Rajasthani recipes? Try Urad Tomatar Dal. We have more recipes planned, so check back here in the future.

Why not browse all of our Okra recipes, and all of our Indian dishes. Our Indian Essentials are here. Have a look at our range of snacks. Or simply explore our Early Autumn dishes.

Continue reading “Kurkuri Bhindi | Crispy Spicy Fried Okra”