Salty Macadamia and Golden Syrup Biscuits | Egg Free

We don’t eat many sweet things around here, especially sweet baked goods – perhaps a little more in Winter than Summer. It is not that we don’t like them (we LOVE them), but biscuits and cakes are basically sugar and butter held together with flour, right? Also, we don’t cook with eggs, so that limits our range as well.

But it is the one of the coldest weeks of Winter as I write, and we are looking for a few more sweet things – rice pudding, apple crumble, golden syrup dumplings, and some biscuits for our cuppa.

I was alerted to this recipe by @CallisClan – she made them one day from a book called Winter on a Farm. The original recipe is here. I have made a slight variation, adding coconut and a little bicarb soda (which adds a little more colour and chewiness to the biscuits). I’ve also sprinkled a little salt over the top before cooking for a delicious sweet-salty taste.

The biscuits are not unlike ANZAC biccies, starting from a base of oats, flour, golden syrup and butter. This combination is so Australian. But the technique and other ingredients differs a little. In ANZAC biscuits, when cooked well, the flour is  partially cooked by the hot butter mix and boiling water. This changes the texture considerably. But in this recipe, the mixture is cooled before adding to the oats and flour. It makes a remarkable difference.

The salt sprinkled over the top of these biscuits is not compulsory and can be omitted.

Similar recipes include Date Tahini Biscuits, Semolina Butter Biscuits, Date Loaf, ANZAC Biscuits, Tahini Biscuits, and Scones.

Or browse all of our Biscuit Recipes.

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Char-Grilled Summer Stone Fruit with Scented Yoghurt

This is a recipe that epitomises the height of Summer in Australia. Beautiful sun ripened stone fruits, grilled on an Aussie BBQ, and drizzled with a sweet scented yoghurt. It really is the best of recipes for this time, perfect perhaps for an Australia Day BBQ.

It is an Ottolenghi recipe, from his beautiful Plenty More book. We’ve cooked most of the recipes from this book, and have loved them all. In this recipe, Ottolenghi uses Lemon Geranium Water – a Tunisian ingredient that is more difficult to find locally. Orange Blossom Water is a good substitute (as is any other floral water).

We feel free to make substitutes in Ottolenghi’s recipes. See notes below the recipe about the fruit combination that we used. We are lucky enough to have lavender growing in our garden, but if it is not available to you, please omit it. I’ve also used Tulsi and mint leaves today, as sweet basil was not available. Mint is a really nice substitute.

Similar dishes include Blueberries with Bay Custard and Gin. Strawberry and Peach Lassi, Peaches with Asian Flavours, and Watermelon and Peach Salad.

Browse all of our Peach recipes, Fig Recipes and our Desserts. Or browse our Mid Summer dishes.
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Coconut Sticky Black Rice Pudding

I was fortunate to have holidays in Bali before it became a tourist nightmare. Back in the days when the culture was still strong and visible and the rowdy tourists were fewer and stuck to the beaches. Back in the days when it was possible to see forbidden villages, inner sanctums of temples, people making tofu and tempeh in their back yards and to come across beautiful cultural performances without tourists.

Also to come across a range of ingredients and cooking techniques that were at the time fairly unknown outside of Indonesia. Amongst those was the afternoon servings of locally made sweet items including a coconut black rice dish (Bubu Injin).

I tried to bring some local black rice back with me, but of course it was not permitted by customs. Luckily, glutinous rices are now available from Asian shops, as are pandan leaves and palm sugar.

Similar recipes include Char Grilled Stone Fruit with Scented Yoghurt, Balinese Sweet Red Rice, Black Rice with Chinese Flavours, Black Glutinous Rice Congee, Mushrooms with Black Glutinous Rice, and Pandan Rice Pudding.

Browse all of our Balinese recipes, our Glutinous Rice dishes and our Rice Puddings.

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Tre’s Date Loaf | A Cake Full of Love (No Eggs)

Tre is my Sister in Law’s sister, and a more generous and loving person you might not meet on this earth. A couple of years ago, in the mad mad lead-up to Xmas, I was holidaying on an island that is not very far from her place – just a ferry ride. It is a remote island without power, just gas bottles and solar energy, on a mountainous island with no amenities. Just beach. Water and sand. Small shacks on the hilltops. Privacy. Great views. No shops, parks or amusements of any kind. It was bliss.

Tre sent over, via ferry, a wonderful date loaf, so fresh it was still warm as it arrived, wrapped in foil and still in the tin. My heart melted. Such thoughtfulness and love in the midst of her family pre Xmas chaos. Not only that, as I returned from the island, refreshed and peaceful, she took me and my family into her house for 5 days of Xmas celebrations and cheer. My heart overflows.

This is Tre’s Date Cake. Easy, delicious and full of love.

We so rarely bake, there are no other cakes on this site to share with you!! In over 2,000 recipes – no cakes!!! 😱 🤨☹️

But you can browse our few Desserts, some Date recipes, and explore our Mid Autumn dishes.

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Balinese Style Sweet Red Rice with Sweet Spices and Coconut Milk

Recently I’ve been playing with some of the recipes from the week-long cooking school in Bali. This red rice dish mimics the spices and leaves used in Balinese cuisine and serves the rice with coconut milk, mango puree, toasted coconut and roasted slices of lime. However, you can top the rice with any number of things – dried mango or other dried fruits, diced rockmelon, ripe papaya for example.

Just a note about the rice – this is Balinese, Indonesian or Thai style red rice, not the red rice of Sri Lanka or Kerala. These rices might also make a great dish but I have not tried them in this way. Suitable rice can be found here in Australia in red packets and called Forbidden Rice. The Black Forbidden Rice might also be suitable, and dramatic, to use.

Similar recipes include Sago Payasam, Sweet Congee with Poached Oranges, and Warm Rice Pudding with Orange Star Anise Sauce.

Browse all of our Red Rice recipes and all of our Rice Puddings. Or browse our Early Winter Recipes.

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Frozen Berries with White Chocolate Cream

In the extreme weather of Summer in Australia – temperatures of 47C in Adelaide and catastrophic fires across Australia – we made this beautiful dish. It was a change from consuming copious amounts of icecream and fruit lassi. It really is beautiful – sweet, chocolaty with overtones of the bitters used to dress the fruit. It is my new favourite Ottolenghi dish.

It is a dish from the Dessert section of Ottolenghi’s Plenty More. We don’t often make dessert but this one is one of the best, now on our Summer rotation. With all Ottolenghi recipes I feel free to substitute whatever is in our fridge or pantry at the time. For this recipe, I bought a bag of mixed frozen berries, and used primarily the berries other than the strawberries. It was delicious and a cost effective way of making this dish in Australia. He suggests using a lot of red and black currents, but they are hard to get and expensive here. If you find your fruit too sweet with the chocolate cream, add some lemon juice to them.

You can check Ottolenghi’s original recipes in his books and in his various print columns.

The berries in fact are very useful for other dishes – serve them with Rice Pudding, Besan Payasam, for instance, or with French Toast.

Similar recipes include Blueberries with Bay Custard and Gin, Creme Fraiche Icecream, Junket with Macerated Strawberries and Passionfruit, and French Toast with Baked Strawberries.

Browse all of our Desserts, Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Mid Summer recipes.

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Roasted Cumquats with Flowering Thyme on Besan Custard (Payasam) and Passion Fruit Syrup

One of our cumquat trees is hanging heavy with fruit, looking gorgeous in the Autumn sun. The other one is covered in flowers! Go figure the timing! It is a different variety though, so perhaps that accounts for it.

We use a lot of cumquats, loving cumquat tea, poached cumquats, cumquat jam, cumquat pickles and  many other ways of using them.  I saw a house with a cumquat tree hedge recently, and I have just gone wild thinking about how I can do that at my place!

Today we are roasting the cumquats, and using them with some of our thyme that is flowering in the garden, and the seeds and juice of passion fruit, and sitting it all on an eggless custard type mixture that I love to make. I call it Indian custard, but its real name is Besan Payasam.

BTW, In Australia we spell passionfruit as one word. They are abundant here and we take them for granted. We eat them fresh from the garden, we use the pulp for our national dish Pavlova, and we used to drink Passiona soft drink by the litre back in the day.

Similar dishes include Kasa Kasa Payasam, Cumquat Mango Chutney, Sago Payasam, Pandan Rice Pudding with Lime Syrup and Fruits, and  Cumquats and Gin.

Browse all of our Cumquat dishes and our Dessert Recipes. Or simply explore our Early Autumn dishes.

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Grilled Sweetcorn Slaw with Cabbage and Carrot

I read that the average head of sweetcorn has 800 kernels, all lined up in 16 neat rows, and each of those kernels is a seed in its own right. While we eat sweetcorn as a vegetable, it is, technically speaking, a grass, being a variety of maize that is harvested when the ears are immature. As a result, the sugar content in the kernels is much higher than it is in other varieties of maize, which are harvested at a much later stage when they are dry, and eaten as a grain. When you eat the kernels of sweetcorn whole, be that gnawing them off the cob or after shaving off the kernels first, the starch element is retained in each seed, making the dominant experience of eating fresh corn one of tender, juicy sweetness.

Today we are using that beautiful sweet seed of the grass in a slaw with cabbage and carrot. The sweetcorn is grilled first, intensifying the sweetness, before being mixed with a mustard dressing and the slaw ingredients.

This is an Ottolenghi dish from Plenty More – we are cooking our way through this book. We feel free to substitute ingredients that are not readily available in our local area.

In fact, it is Ottolenghi Cooking the Books Day on the blog – one of two days per month where we publish the latest recipes we have tried in our project of cooking from Ottolenghi’s books – those we have cooked directly and those we have been inspired by. Currently we are cooking from Plenty More, but not ignoring his other books completely. Note that I often massage the recipes to suit what is available from our garden and pantry. For the original recipes, check his books and his Guardian column.

Similar dishes include Grilled Corn with Miso-Tamarind Mayo, Summer Roll Salad, Red Cabbage Slaw with Barberries, Crunchy Root Vegetable Slaw, Salad with Swiss Cheese and Rye, Sweetcorn and Tomato Salad, and Roasted Sweetcorn and Avocado Salad.

Browse all of our Sweetcorn dishes, our Sweetcorn Salads and all of our Salads. Our Ottolenghi dishes from Plenty More are here. We have written about our experiences cooking through this book. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

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Sweet Surnoli Dosa | A Konkani Recipe from Goa

A cousin to Eliappe, the Surnoli is equally as delicious

Talking about Eliappe prompted Moni Bharadwaj (who is the daughter of one of the authors of Festivals of India) to remind me of Surnoli. Surnoli is a Konkani dosa made from fermented rice batter in a similar way to Eliappe. How wonderful to have two very similar dishes, from different parts of India.

Surnoli is a Kokani dish from Goa eaten for breakfast or as a tiffin or even for dinner. Yellow in colour, they have a puffy texture with holes due to fermentation, and are eaten with home made butter. They can be sweet (as here) or made without jaggery for a savoury pikelet. When sweet, surnoli  have a porous and soft texture due to the jaggery, and they taste very good.

This dish uses poha, an Indian rolled rice. It is easily obtainable from your Indian shop. There are several different thicknesses of poha – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). There are also poha types made from red rice and brown rice. For this dish, use a white, medium or thick poha for better results.

If you like this recipe you should also try Methi Dosa, Eliappe and Crumpets. We have other Dosas – try Potato Dosa, Cheela, and Coconut Dosa.

Are you looking for other Poha dishes? Try Poha with Onions (Kanda Poha), Kolache Poha, and Poha with Banana, Honey and Coconut.

Are you looking for other Breakfast dishes? Try Baked Figs with Thyme, Bondi Bircher Muesli, and Rose Yoghurt with Fruits.

Would you like other dishes from Goa? Try Fried Okra, Fiejoada, and Beetroot and Carrot Subzi.

Have a look at our Sweet Dosa recipes. All of our Breakfast dishes are here. You might also like to browse all of our Desserts. Or check out all of our Poha recipes and Dosa recipes. All of our Goan dishes are here. Or simply explore our Mid Spring recipes.

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