Punjabi Aloo Wadiyan

Wadiyan (also spelled Varian and Badiyan) are large balls of dried lentils, peculiar to the cuisine of the Punjab. They are sun dried spicy urad dal balls that serve to spice a dish and also to thicken the gravy. They are very spicy and each bite sends a burst of flavour to your tastebuds. They are also quite meaty in texture, and thus a good option for your non-vegetarian friends.

This dish cooks the wadi and potatoes in a tomato-onion-spiced gravy for a relative quick, definitely easy meal. Wadi go very well with potatoes, but can be cooked with other vegetables too. Today I have used a mixture of potatoes and sweet potatoes, or you can use butternut and potatoes. These mixtures are not really traditional, but work very well in the modern kitchen.

Because the wadi are extra spicy, not a lot of other spice is needed in the dish.

Similar dishes include Punjabi Wadi (Badi) and Vegetables, Aloo Baingan Wadiyan, and Mung Wadi.

Browse all of our Punjabi dishes, and all of our Potato recipes. Or explore our Early Spring dishes.

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Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi | Potato and Eggplant Curry with Punjabi Wadi

An excellent curry from the Punjab region.

There are many types of wadi/vadai from all over India — this dish takes large Punjabi ones made of sundried lentils and spices (urad dal, mung dal, black pepper, cumin, chillies etc.)

The wadis add flavour, but they also add a wonderful texture to dishes, and being so dry they soak up the wettest of gravies making the dish perfectly composed with a thickness that is delectable. You can get them at your Indian Grocer, but you might like to call first and ask if they stock them. Ask for the large Punjabi Wadi. Or you can make your own!

Similar recipes include Aloo Wadiyan, Punjabi Wadi (Badi) and Vegetables, and Eggplant in Tamarind Leaf Paste. You might also like to try our Punjabi Dal Makhani recipes.

Browse our Subzi recipes, all of our Potato recipes, all Eggplant recipes, and all of our Indian recipes. Find inspiration in our easy Late Autumn dishes.

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Mung Wadi | Mung Vadi | Mangodi | Mung Dal Badis | Dried Mung Dal Nuggets

Indian cuisine has a wealth of sun dried ingredients.

Mmmm, mangodi. I have a fascination at the moment with all things dried in Indian cuisine. Traditionally, the drying is done in the sunshine, but we often don’t have that luxury. However, with a dehydrator we can make dried wadi, vadagam, and other goodies.

Mung Wadi are a type of wadi and are special dried lentil dumplings usually made with mung dal, but other dals (yellow, red, split green or urad dal) can be used. They can be made quite plain (allowing more versatility in the spicing of their final dish) or spices can be added before drying. Like any canvas, they can take quite a range of spices and even some herbs.

On their own, these wadi are not edible, but deep fried, sauteed in a little oil or dry roasted they can be used on their own as a snack; in curries, adding spices and texture; in stirfries, soups and sambars; and in rice dishes etc. Cooked in a sauce, these dry brittle nuggets soak up the flavor and the sauce and becomes spongy and tender. Even crushed, they can be added to salads, sprinkled over the tops of soups or over steamed or BBQ’s vegetables.

You might also like to try Tomato, Eggplant and Potato Subzi with Wadi (Aloo Baingan Wadi Ki Subzi), or Masala Mung Wadi – in a Tomato-Garlic Sauce.. Or browse all of our Indian recipes here and here.  You might get inspiration from our Spring time recipes here and here.

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Vatral Kuzhambu

Dried Onion Dumplings in a Spicy Tamarind Broth.

This is  S. Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See book’s Vatral (Vathal) Kuzhambu. Vathal or vatral are vegetables that have been salted, spiced, and dried in India during the hottest parts of the year. They are not only delicious, but also an excellent way of preserving vegetables for the colder and wetter seasons. They come in all guises, and are often made at home.

You can make your own, but they are also available at Indian stores and groceries. They go wonderfully well in a tamarind-rich spicy gravy.

You might like to explore other recipes for kuzhambus, sambars and rasams. Are you wondering what is the difference between a kuzhambu and a sambar? You might like to read this post that answers that question. Or browse all of our Indian recipes here and here. Explore our Indian Essentials here.

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