Daunker Pachadi | Danger Pachadi | Urad Dal

Daunker Pachadi, also known as Dangar, Danger, Daanger, or Urad Dal Pachadi,  is a simple pachadi that is very famous in Thanjavur in Tamil Nadu. It is not made very often now, one of the forgotten recipes of Tamil Nadu. It is a pity because it has quite a unique flavour from the black gram powder mixed into the pachadi.

This Pachadi is a great accompaniment for Vathal Kuzhambu, Rasam or Sambar with rice or just with a mixed rice dish. There are some variations from other parts of Tamil Nadu and beyond, such as Chettinadu.

In Thajavur, there are couple of different versions of this  – one with unroasted urad flour, and one where the flour is roasted. I have included both recipes below.

These recipes are from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See books. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes.You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Similar recipes include Okra Pachadi, Nethu Kottu Flour Pachadi, Methi Sprouts Tambuli, Boondhi Pachadi, Tri Colour Pachadi, and Sago Kitchari.

Browse all of our Urad recipes and all of our Pachadis. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Late Spring dishes.

Continue reading “Daunker Pachadi | Danger Pachadi | Urad Dal”

Cucumber Pachadi (or use Snake Gourd, Ridge Gourd or Chow Chow)

We have a few ways of making Cucumber Pachadi, varying just a little in ingredients. This is one of the simplest and one of the favourites.

It is of course, from Meenakshi Ammal and Vol 1 of her Cook and See books.

Similar recipes include Okra Pachadi, Nethu Kottu Flour Pachadi, Methi Sprouts Tambuli, Zucchini, Lime Leaf and Yoghurt Salad, Chow Chow Kari, Vellarikkai Thayir Pachadi, Tomato Pachadi, and Bitter Melon Pachadi.

Or browse all of our Pachadi recipes.

Continue reading “Cucumber Pachadi (or use Snake Gourd, Ridge Gourd or Chow Chow)”

Nethu Kottu Flour Pachadi | Kottu Maavu Pachadi

There are a couple of pachadi recipes that are healthy and delicious and also perfect for the times that you don’t have any vegetables to add. One is Daunker Pachadi, made with powdered urad dal, and this one, Kottu Mauva Pachadi, made with powdered mixed dals and grains.

It is quite easy to make if you have a spice grinder – the roasted dals and grains are ground to a powder with turmeric and pepper.

This is a recipe from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See Volume 1. We love cooking these traditional Tamil recipes. You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Similar recipes include Okra Pachadi, Poha Yoghurt Pachadi, Tomato Pachadi, Tri Colour Pachadi, and Bitter Melon Pachadi.

Continue reading “Nethu Kottu Flour Pachadi | Kottu Maavu Pachadi”

Green Mango Pachadi | Maangai Pachadi

What is a pachadi? For many people, it is equivalent to a raita, and indeed there are curd or yoghurt based pachadi dishes that have similarities with the raitas of the North of India. It is these dishes that are most well known throughout India. Even Wikipedia thinks these are the only curd based pachadis in some regions like Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.

But my goodness, there are quite a few variations of Pachadi, from the ground vegetable and green ones of Andhra Pradesh, to the mashed vegetables of the South, to ones that contain cooked vegetables or fruits in a white, non-dairy sauce, to the sweet pachadis of Kerala (also without yoghurt). They take the form of side dishes, salads, pickles or chutneys.

Meaning of Pachadi

Pachadi means pounded and in many pachadi dishes the ingredients are either ground, minced, mashed or diced and cooked according to the custom of that region.

Meenakshi Ammal

Today’s recipe, one of Meenakshi Ammal’s, uses a sweet-sour mango which is cooked in a slightly sweet, almost unspiced sauce and topped with chillies and mustard seed. It is a typical non-yoghurt pachadi from Tamil Nadu – perhaps less popular today than 50 years ago but still part of Tamil cuisine. We love to cook from Ammal’s Cook and See, and you can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made so far here.

You can imagine that this style of dish perhaps even preceded the yoghurt based dishes, or perhaps were made as an alternative when yoghurt was not available. Or perhaps it is just made to vary the daily routine.

Festival Recipe

In Madurai, this Mango Pachadi is made on Tamil New Years Day in April, with fried Neem Flower Powder added at the end of cooking.

Other Recipes

Similar dishes include Dried Mango Pachadi, Madhura Pachadi, Milky Brinjal Pachadi, and Green Mango with Coconut Milk. Read more about types of Pachadi here.

Browse all of our Pachadi dishes and all of our Green Mango recipes. Or explore our Early Autumn collection.

Continue reading “Green Mango Pachadi | Maangai Pachadi”

Sago Pachadi with Yoghurt

Sago, ignored in some countries, used for sweet items in others, is very common in India. It is used in both sweet and savoury incarnations. Today we have a yoghurt Pachadi – sago is deep fried and mixed with yoghurt and spices for a cooling accompaniment to a hot spicy meal.

Deep frying makes the sago puff and expand and taste a little like puffed rice, or even caramelised popcorn. They soften a little in the yoghurt for a delicious and textural dish.

Pachadi is a South Indian dish – quite different to a Raita, but you can say it is the counterpart of Raita. Perhaps they are second cousins. Although appearing similar to some (yoghurt base, chopped vegetables or other small items), the approach and seasoning is different. At least, traditionally. Dishes seem to merge into one another in these days of the internet and Western influence.

This recipe is one from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See books. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes.You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Read more about Sabudana (sago and tapioca) here.

Similar recipes include Onion Pachadi, Tri Colour Pachadi, and Sago Kitchari.

Browse all of our Sago recipes and all of our Pachadis. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Mid Spring dishes.

Continue reading “Sago Pachadi with Yoghurt”

Aval Thayir Pachadi and Aval Karuvadam Pachadi | Poha Yoghurt Pachadi

A couple of the less common pachadis are made with aval (poha) and with aval karuvadam. They are made similar to the Sago Pachadi, so are very easy and quick.

When you visit your Indian grocery you will see that Poha comes in different thicknesses  – Nylon (very thin and crisp), Paper, Thin, Medium, Thick and Dagdi (thick and chewy). There is also poha made from red rice and brown rice as well as white rice. Any poha can be used for this recipe – I have used Dagdi today. When the poha is sauteed, it is crispy and more’ish.

You can also make pachadi from the vadam made from aval. Simply break them apart, saute them and mix with yoghurt. Season as usual with mustard seeds, green chilli and curry leaves. The recipe for this is also below.

This recipe is one from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See books. One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes.You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Similar recipes include Boondhi Pachadi, Tri Colour Pachadi, and Sago Kitchari.

Browse all of our Sago recipes and all of our Pachadis. Our Indian recipes are here and our Indian Essentials here. Or take some time to explore our Mid Spring dishes.

Continue reading “Aval Thayir Pachadi and Aval Karuvadam Pachadi | Poha Yoghurt Pachadi”

Indian Essentials: Black Gram Powder (Raw and Roasted) | Urad Powder and Flour

Black gram powder/flour is used in a range of South Indian dishes including yummy snacks. It is easy to make and hardly needs a recipe.

If making roasted powder, roast the urad first. Take hulled whole urad and roast in a dry pan until the beans are aromatic and turning red. Watch carefully so it does not burn.

For raw and roasted powder, now grind the urad into a fine powder.

Use in recipes as instructed. Continue reading “Indian Essentials: Black Gram Powder (Raw and Roasted) | Urad Powder and Flour”

Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Pickle with Oil | Narthangai Oorugai

Kaffir Lime, now referred to as Makrut lime due to the previous name having racial connotations in South Africa, is close enough to Narthangai for the sake of making pickles. I will also use Makrut Lime in pickles in place of Kitarangai.

My Makrut lime tree is now bearing well enough to make a couple of types of pickles, and this first recipe is from Meenakshi Ammal in the first volume of her books Cook and See. It is a raw pickle (the lime is not cooked before making the pickle). The chopped limes are macerated in salt and turmeric powder for a day before more spices and sesame oil is added. It is a pickle that will keep for a long time.

Similar recipes include Lime Pickle without Oil, Green Mango Pickle, Green Apple Pickle, and Quince Aachar.

Browse all of our Indian Pickles. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Early Winter recipes.

Continue reading “Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Pickle with Oil | Narthangai Oorugai”

Pumpkin Milk Kootu

Today we have another of the rare Indian recipes that use milk. This recipe is one that can substitute the milk for coconut milk if that is more to your taste.

In India, milk is usually reserved for desserts, and in Ayurveda the consumption of milk with vegetables is not encouraged. In this recipe, I imagine that home cooks would use milk thickened with rice flour in place of coconut milk if that was not available.

It is best made with Indian tender pumpkin, but I have also made it with a number of our pumpkin varieties and quite love it. It is a very simple dish – pumpkin, seasoned, in milk with a simple tadka. But simple is best, no?

The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See – very traditional Tamil recipes. You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here. Most of them are from Vol 1 so far.

Similar dishes include Cluster Beans Kootu, Green Bean Kootu, and Brinjal Asadu.

Browse all of our Kootu recipes and all of our Pumpkin dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Autumn recipes.

Continue reading “Pumpkin Milk Kootu”

Cluster Beans Jaggery Kootu

Another in our Kootu series is made with cluster beans, and jaggery is added which counterbalances the slight bitterness of the beans and compliments the tamarind very well. It is slightly sweet-sour.

Most Kootus are made from vegetables, coconut and a mix of spices. Sometimes lentils or a dal is added to thicken the kootu. Generally kootus are made with vegetables that are locally available.

The recipe is another of Meenakshi Ammal‘s from her cook books Cook and See. She says that this same Kootu can be made with green beans, sabre beans, eggplant, plantain, plantain flower and chow chow.

Similar dishes include Plantain Mash, Chow Chow Kari, Pumpkin Milk Kootu, Cluster Bean Kootu, Brinjal Kootu and Mango Kootu.

Browse all of our Kootu recipes and all of our Cluster Bean dishes. All of our Indian recipes are here, and our Indian Essentials are here. Or explore our Late Summer recipes.

Continue reading “Cluster Beans Jaggery Kootu”